A Sixty Minute Vigilance Task With 100 Scoreable Responses Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Robert S. Kennedy
Publisher :
Release : 1968
Page : 10
Category : Vigilance (Psychology)
ISBN 13 :
Description :


Four forms of a vigilance task were administered over four sessions in counterbalanced order to 16 subjects. Three of the tasks required auditory (1, 2, or 3 tones) and one required visual (3 lights) monitoring. Visual performance was superior to auditory performance which was a function of the number of channels monitored, and performance for the four sessions was asymptotic. Among the different scoring methods used, 'percent correct' had the most common variance. Decrements in performance appeared within 10 minutes in the one- and two-channel auditory tasks. An overall downward trend appeared in the three-channel visual task but was less regular. No systematic change in performance was apparent in the three-channel auditory task. Intratask correlations were high (> .75), while intertest correlations showed only a 20 per cent common variance. (Author).


Author : Robert S. Kennedy
NAVAL AEROSPACE MEDICAL INST PENSACOLA FLA.
Publisher :
Release : 1968
Page : 15
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :


Four forms of a vigilance task were administered over four sessions in counterbalanced order to 16 subjects. Three of the tasks required auditory (1, 2, or 3 tones) and one required visual (3 lights) monitoring. Visual performance was superior to auditory performance which was a function of the number of channels monitored, and performance for the four sessions was asymptotic. Among the different scoring methods used, 'percent correct' had the most common variance. Decrements in performance appeared within 10 minutes in the one- and two-channel auditory tasks. An overall downward trend appeared in the three-channel visual task but was less regular. No systematic change in performance was apparent in the three-channel auditory task. Intratask correlations were high (> .75), while intertest correlations showed only a 20 per cent common variance. (Author).


Author :
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Release : 1969
Page :
Category : Government publications
ISBN 13 :
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Author :
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Release : 1969
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Category : Medicine
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Author : Naval School of Aviation Medicine (U.S.)
Publisher :
Release : 1968
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Category :
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Author : United States. Superintendent of Documents
Publisher :
Release : 1966
Page :
Category : Government publications
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Author : United States. Superintendent of Documents
Publisher :
Release : 1966
Page :
Category : United States
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Author :
Publisher :
Release : 1969
Page :
Category : Aeronautics
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Author :
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Release : 1968
Page :
Category : Research
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Author :
Publisher :
Release : 1969
Page :
Category : Government publications
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Author :
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Release : 1968
Page :
Category : Science
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Author :
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Release : 1968
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Category : Technology
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Author :
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Release : 1968-11
Page :
Category : Science
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Author : Azmeh Shahid
Kate Wilkinson
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release : 2012-01-06
Page : 421
Category : Medical
ISBN 13 : 1441998926
Description :


There are at least four reasons why a sleep clinician should be familiar with rating scales that evaluate different facets of sleep. First, the use of scales facilitates a quick and accurate assessment of a complex clinical problem. In three or four minutes (the time to review ten standard scales), a clinician can come to a broad understanding of the patient in question. For example, a selection of scales might indicate that an individual is sleepy but not fatigued; lacking alertness with no insomnia; presenting with no symptoms of narcolepsy or restless legs but showing clear features of apnea; exhibiting depression and a history of significant alcohol problems. This information can be used to direct the consultation to those issues perceived as most relevant, and can even provide a springboard for explaining the benefits of certain treatment approaches or the potential corollaries of allowing the status quo to continue. Second, rating scales can provide a clinician with an enhanced vocabulary or language, improving his or her understanding of each patient. In the case of the sleep specialist, a scale can help him to distinguish fatigue from sleepiness in a patient, or elucidate the differences between sleepiness and alertness (which is not merely the inverse of the former). Sleep scales are developed by researchers and clinicians who have spent years in their field, carefully honing their preferred methods for assessing certain brain states or characteristic features of a condition. Thus, scales provide clinicians with a repertoire of questions, allowing them to draw upon the extensive experience of their colleagues when attempting to tease apart nuanced problems. Third, some scales are helpful for tracking a patient’s progress. A particular patient may not remember how alert he felt on a series of different stimulant medications. Scale assessments administered periodically over the course of treatment provide an objective record of the intervention, allowing the clinician to examine and possibly reassess her approach to the patient. Finally, for individuals conducting a double-blind crossover trial or a straightforward clinical practice audit, those who are interested in research will find that their own clinics become a source of great discovery. Scales provide standardized measures that allow colleagues across cities and countries to coordinate their practices. They enable the replication of previous studies and facilitate the organization and dissemination of new research in a way that is accessible and rapid. As the emphasis placed on evidence-based care grows, a clinician’s ability to assess his or her own practice and its relation to the wider medical community becomes invaluable. Scales make this kind of standardization possible, just as they enable the research efforts that help to formulate those standards. The majority of Rating Scales in Sleep and Sleep Disorders:100 Scales for Clinical Practice is devoted to briefly discussing individual scales. When possible, an example of the scale is provided so that readers may gain a sense of the instrument’s content. Groundbreaking and the first of its kind to conceptualize and organize the essential scales used in sleep medicine, Rating Scales in Sleep and Sleep Disorders:100 Scales for Clinical Practice is an invaluable resource for all clinicians and researchers interested in sleep disorders.


Author :
Publisher :
Release : 1971
Page :
Category : Deafness
ISBN 13 :
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Author :
Publisher :
Release : 1968
Page :
Category : Government reports announcements & index
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Author :
Publisher :
Release : 1972
Page :
Category : Psychological abstracts
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Author :
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Release : 1969
Page :
Category : Aviation medicine
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Author : Leonard S. Mark
Joel S. Warm
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release : 2012-12-06
Page : 291
Category : Psychology
ISBN 13 : 146124756X
Description :


And Applications To The Human-Computer Interface Michael E. Fotta AT&T Communications 16th FIr. Atrium II, Cincinnati, OH 45202 Artificial intelligence (AI) programs represent knowledge in a fashion similar to human knowledge and the activities of an AI system are closer to human behavior than that of traditional systems. Thus, AI enables the computer to act more like a human instead of making the human think and act more like a computer. This capability combined with applying human factors concepts to the interface can greatly improve the human-computer interface. This paper provides an intro duction to artificial intelligence and then proposes a number of methods for using AI to improve the human-machine inter action. AN INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Definition There are many definitions of artificial intelligence (AI) running from the very general to the very detailed. Perhaps the most well accepted general definition is that by Elaine Rich: "Artificial intelligence is the study of how to make computers do things at which, at the moment, people are better", (Rich, 1983). A good example of a detailed definition is provided by the Brattle Research Corporation; "In simplified terms, artificial intelligence works with pattern matching methods which attempt to describe objects, events or pro cesses in terms of their qualitative features and logical and compu tational relationships," (Mishkoff, 1985).


Author : National Research Council
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
Publisher : National Academies Press
Release : 2014-05-29
Page : 288
Category : Education
ISBN 13 : 0309289548
Description :


Assessments, understood as tools for tracking what and how well students have learned, play a critical role in the classroom. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards develops an approach to science assessment to meet the vision of science education for the future as it has been elaborated in A Framework for K-12 Science Education (Framework) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). These documents are brand new and the changes they call for are barely under way, but the new assessments will be needed as soon as states and districts begin the process of implementing the NGSS and changing their approach to science education. The new Framework and the NGSS are designed to guide educators in significantly altering the way K-12 science is taught. The Framework is aimed at making science education more closely resemble the way scientists actually work and think, and making instruction reflect research on learning that demonstrates the importance of building coherent understandings over time. It structures science education around three dimensions - the practices through which scientists and engineers do their work, the key crosscutting concepts that cut across disciplines, and the core ideas of the disciplines - and argues that they should be interwoven in every aspect of science education, building in sophistication as students progress through grades K-12. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards recommends strategies for developing assessments that yield valid measures of student proficiency in science as described in the new Framework. This report reviews recent and current work in science assessment to determine which aspects of the Framework's vision can be assessed with available techniques and what additional research and development will be needed to support an assessment system that fully meets that vision. The report offers a systems approach to science assessment, in which a range of assessment strategies are designed to answer different kinds of questions with appropriate degrees of specificity and provide results that complement one another. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards makes the case that a science assessment system that meets the Framework's vision should consist of assessments designed to support classroom instruction, assessments designed to monitor science learning on a broader scale, and indicators designed to track opportunity to learn. New standards for science education make clear that new modes of assessment designed to measure the integrated learning they promote are essential. The recommendations of this report will be key to making sure that the dramatic changes in curriculum and instruction signaled by Framework and the NGSS reduce inequities in science education and raise the level of science education for all students.