Colorblind Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Tim Wise
Publisher : City Lights Books
Release : 2010-06-01
Page : 216
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0872865541
Description :


Following the civil rights movement, race relations in the United States entered a new era. Legal gains were interpreted by some as ensuring equal treatment for all and that "colorblind" policies and programs would be the best way forward. Since then, many voices have called for an end to affirmative action and other color-conscious policies and programs, and even for a retreat from public discussion of racism itself. Bolstered by the election of Barack Obama, proponents of colorblindness argue that the obstacles faced by blacks and people of color in the United States can no longer be attributed to racism but instead result from economic forces. Thus, they contend, programs meant to uplift working-class and poor people are the best means for overcoming any racial inequalities that might still persist. In Colorblind, Tim Wise refutes these assertions and advocates that the best way forward is to become more, not less, conscious of race and its impact on equal opportunity. Focusing on disparities in employment, housing, education and healthcare, Wise argues that racism is indeed still an acute problem in the United States today, and that colorblind policies actually worsen the problem of racial injustice. Colorblind presents a timely and provocative look at contemporary racism and offers fresh ideas on what can be done to achieve true social justice and economic equality. "It's a great book. I highly, highly, highly recommend it."—Tavis Smiley "I finally finished Tim Wise's Colorblind and found it a right-on, straight-ahead piece of work. This guy hits all the targets, it's really quite remarkable…That's two of his that I've read [the first being Between Barack] and they are both works of crystal truth…"—Mumia Abu-Jamal "Tim Wise's Colorblind is a powerful and urgently needed book. One of our best and most courageous public voices on racial inequality, Wise tackles head on the resurgence and absurdity of post-racial liberalism in a world still largely structured by deep racial disparity and structural inequality. He shows us with passion and sharp, insightful, accessible analysis how this imagined world of post racial framing and policy can't take us where we want to go—it actually stymies our progress toward racial unity and equality."—Tricia Rose, Brown University "With Colorblind, Tim Wise offers a gutsy call to arms. Rather than play nice and reiterate the fiction of black racial transcendence, Wise takes the gloves off: He insists white Americans themselves must be at the forefront of the policy shifts necessary to correct our nation's racial imbalances in crime, health, wealth, education and more. A piercing, passionate and illuminating critique of the post-racial moment."—Bakari Kitwana "Tim Wise's Colorblind brilliantly challenges the idea that the election of Obama has ushered in a post-racial era. In clear, engaging, and accessible prose, Wise explains that ignoring problems does not make them go away, that race-bound problems require race-conscious remedies. Perhaps most important, Colorblind proposes practical solutions to our problems and promotes new ways of thinking that encourage us to both recognize differences and to transcend them."—George Lipsitz Tim Wise is one of the most prominent antiracist essayists, educators and activists in the United States. For twenty years he has challenged racial inequities as a community organizer, public speaker, workshop facilitator and writer. He has spoken to hundreds of thousands of people, contributed essays or chapters to more than twenty books, and has appeared regularly on radio and television as a guest commentator on race issues. He is regularly interviewed by national media, including CNN, Tavis Smiley and by Tom Joyner. He is the author of Between Barack and a Hard Place: Racism and White Denial in the Age of Obama.


Author : Siera Maley
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release : 2016-03-02
Page : 228
Category : High school students
ISBN 13 : 9781508403043
Description :


Harper has a secret...and it's not that she likes girls. She has a rare gift: she can see how old other people will be when they die. Nothing she does changes this number, and that becomes especially clear when her mother dies in a car crash. With only one other person in the world who knows about and shares her gift, Harper is determined to keep her distance from everyone. Then she falls for Chloe... whose number is 16. That means that Chloe doesn't have twelve months to live. She doesn't even have six. She is going to be dead by the end of the summer, unless Harper can find a way to stop it.


Author : Oliver Sacks
Publisher : Vintage
Release : 2012-11-14
Page : 336
Category : Psychology
ISBN 13 : 0345805895
Description :


Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands--their remoteness, their mystery, above all the unique forms of life they harbor. For him, islands conjure up equally the romance of Melville and Stevenson, the adventure of Magellan and Cook, and the scientific wonder of Darwin and Wallace. Drawn to the tiny Pacific atoll of Pingelap by intriguing reports of an isolated community of islanders born totally color-blind, Sacks finds himself setting up a clinic in a one-room island dispensary, where he listens to these achromatopic islanders describe their colorless world in rich terms of pattern and tone, luminance and shadow. And on Guam, where he goes to investigate the puzzling neurodegenerative paralysis endemic there for a century, he becomes, for a brief time, an island neurologist, making house calls with his colleague John Steele, amid crowing cockerels, cycad jungles, and the remains of a colonial culture. The islands reawaken Sacks's lifelong passion for botany--in particular, for the primitive cycad trees, whose existence dates back to the Paleozoic--and the cycads are the starting point for an intensely personal reflection on the meaning of islands, the dissemination of species, the genesis of disease, and the nature of deep geologic time. Out of an unexpected journey, Sacks has woven an unforgettable narrative which immerses us in the romance of island life, and shares his own compelling vision of the complexities of being human.


Author : Leslie G. Carr
Publisher : SAGE
Release : 1997-08-19
Page : 193
Category : Political Science
ISBN 13 : 9780761904441
Description :


Many of the vestiges of the Civil Rights movement, including initiatives such as affirmative action, are increasingly under attack by those who assert that the Constitution is explicitly "color-blind." In this argument, the government is not legally permitted to take race into account in a "color conscious" manner. More than 30 years have passed since the landmark Civil Rights Acts became the law of the land. Yet, one of three African American men between the ages of 18 and 27 is in the hands of the criminal justice system, churches are burning in the South, and right-wing militia groups are flourishing. In this provocative and timely book, Leslie G. Carr suggests that the Constitution can be read as "racist," and that the concept of "color-blindness" is in fact the latest in a series of racist ideologies that have been part of the American fabric. "Color-Blind" Racism provides a thorough historical grounding in racist ideologies in the United States, and will be of great interest to anyone teaching or studying race relations, public policy, urban studies, and race and politics.


Author : Ayanna Thompson
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2006-09-12
Page : 280
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1135867046
Description :


The systematic practice of non-traditional or "colorblind" casting began with Joseph Papp's New York Shakespeare Festival in the 1950s. Although colorblind casting has been practiced for half a century now, it still inspires vehement controversy and debate. This collection of fourteen original essays explores both the production history of colorblind casting in cultural terms and the theoretical implications of this practice for reading Shakespeare in a contemporary context.


Author : Sarah E. Turner
Publisher : NYU Press
Release : 2014-04-04
Page : 363
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1479891533
Description :


The election of President Barack Obama signaled for many the realization of a post-racial America, a nation in which racism was no longer a defining social, cultural, and political issue. While many Americans espouse a “colorblind” racial ideology and publicly endorse the broad goals of integration and equal treatment without regard to race, in actuality this attitude serves to reify and legitimize racism and protects racial privileges by denying and minimizing the effects of systematic and institutionalized racism. In The Colorblind Screen, the contributors examine television’s role as the major discursive medium in the articulation and contestation of racialized identities in the United States. While the dominant mode of televisual racialization has shifted to a “colorblind” ideology that foregrounds racial differences in order to celebrate multicultural assimilation, the volume investigates how this practice denies the significant social, economic, and political realities and inequalities that continue to define race relations today. Focusing on such iconic figures as President Obama, LeBron James, and Oprah Winfrey, many chapters examine the ways in which race is read by television audiences and fans. Other essays focus on how visual constructions of race in dramas like 24, Sleeper Cell, and The Wanted continue to conflate Arab and Muslim identities in post-9/11 television. The volume offers an important intervention in the study of the televisual representation of race, engaging with multiple aspects of the mythologies developing around notions of a “post-racial” America and the duplicitous discursive rationale offered by the ideology of colorblindness.


Author : Sarah Shin
Publisher : InterVarsity Press
Release : 2017-11-14
Page : 208
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 0830888977
Description :


While society may try to be colorblind, we can’t ignore that God created us with our ethnic identities, and he made them for good. Ethnicity and evangelism specialist Sarah Shin reveals how our broken ethnic stories can be restored and redeemed, demonstrating God's power to others and bringing good news to the world. Discover how your ethnic story can be transformed for compelling witness and mission.


Author : Myra J.
Makelim
Publisher : iUniverse
Release : 2001-01-20
Page : 156
Category : Fiction
ISBN 13 : 0595175333
Description :


Brooklyn figured all of life's riddles would be solved if she could just get Zac Henderson to notice her. Little did she know that getting his attention would be just the beginning of her problems. Take an emotional rollercoaster ride with Brooklyn as she learns, and teaches, that love isn't black or white. It's colorblind.


Author : Laurie Cooper Stoll
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release : 2019-07-26
Page : 148
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 150953427X
Description :


Is being colorblind the most effective way to address overt and covert racism in schooling today? Should educators pretend that race doesn’t matter? Award-winning sociologist Laurie Cooper Stoll argues that, as long as society is stratified along racial lines, taking a colorblind approach will never end racial inequalities in schooling. Educators must strive to be color-conscious and actively engage in antiracism if they want to address prejudice and discrimination in education and the wider society. If not, they end up perpetuating racial inequity and white supremacy, whether intentionally or not. Drawing on her research and professional development with educators as well as her experience as a publicly elected school board member, Stoll illustrates the complexities, contradictions, and consequences of colorblindness in schools and provides concrete suggestions for people coming to racial justice work in education from multiple entry points.


Author : Johnathan Harris
Publisher : Zuiker Press
Release : 2019-04-16
Page : 96
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 1947378120
Description :


Johnathan, a fifteen-year-old African American from Long Beach, California, shares his story of being physically and verbally harassed because of his race, and of overcoming the discrimination to embrace all cultures, and then to be proud of his own. Colorblind: A Story of Racism is the third in a series of graphic novels written by young adults for their peers. Johnathan Harris is fifteen, and lives in Long Beach, California, where he loves playing soccer with his friends, and listening to their favorite rapper, Snoop Dogg, a Long Beach native. His mom, dad, and three brothers are tight, but one of the most influential family members for Johnathan is his Uncle Russell, a convict in prison, serving fifteen years to life . . . Uncle Russell taught Johnathan from a very young age to see people from the perspective of their cultures, and not just their skin color. He imbued a pride of his ancestry and cautioned against letting hatred into his heart. But when Johnathan was just eight years old, something happened that filled him with fear and the very hatred that Uncle Russell had warned him about. What happened to Johnathan made him see that a dream of a colorless world was just that. A dream. That event shook him to his core. Anger grew inside him like a hot coal. Uncle Russell had told him to “throw it away or you will get burned,” but Johnathan was young and frightened. He was having a hard time forgiving, much less forgetting. Colorblind is Johnathan’s story of confronting his own racism and overcoming it. It is a story of hope and optimism that all, young and old, should heed. Zuiker Press is proud to publish stories about important current topics for kids and adolescents, written by their peers, that will help them cope with the challenges they face in today’s troubled world.


Author : Hoang Vu Tran
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2019-07-04
Page : 160
Category : Education
ISBN 13 : 135111672X
Description :


This book provides detailed analysis of Supreme Court judgments which have impacted the rights of minorities in relation to higher education, and so illustrates ongoing issues of racial discrimination throughout the American education sector. Race, Law, and Higher Education in the Colorblind Era brings together the many racial disputes that have been adjudicated by the Supreme Court to investigate the politics of colorblindness in the post-civil rights era. Through a reading of these various cases as a form of continuing racial discourse, this book focuses on the ways in which racial disputes operate within a clearly entwined colorblind narrative that invalidates racial justice for minorities. By investigating how the Supreme Court has understood racism and the concept of race across its history, this volume demonstrates how colleges and universities must navigate the often contradictory and perilous landscape of ‘diversity’ in attempts to integrate historically disadvantaged minorities. This book will be of interest to researchers, academics, and postgraduate students in the fields of sociology of education, multicultural education, and legal education.


Author : Jesse Curtis
Publisher : NYU Press
Release : 2021-11-09
Page : 320
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 1479809373
Description :


"This book explores the history of Black and white evangelical encounters in the second half of the twentieth century and shows how white evangelicals used Christian colorblindness, a theology of race emphasizing unity in Christ, to adapt to the civil rights movement while creating an evangelical form of whiteness"--


Author : J. Morgan Kousser
Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
Release : 2000-11-09
Page : 608
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0807862657
Description :


Challenging recent trends both in historical scholarship and in Supreme Court decisions on civil rights, J. Morgan Kousser criticizes the Court's "postmodern equal protection" and demonstrates that legislative and judicial history still matter for public policy. Offering an original interpretation of the failure of the First Reconstruction (after the Civil War) by comparing it with the relative success of the Second (after World War II), Kousser argues that institutions and institutional rules--not customs, ideas, attitudes, culture, or individual behavior--have been the primary forces shaping American race relations throughout the country's history. Using detailed case studies of redistricting decisions and the tailoring of electoral laws from Los Angeles to the Deep South, he documents how such rules were designed to discriminate against African Americans and Latinos. Kousser contends that far from being colorblind, Shaw v. Reno (1993) and subsequent "racial gerrymandering" decisions of the Supreme Court are intensely color-conscious. Far from being conservative, he argues, the five majority justices and their academic supporters are unreconstructed radicals who twist history and ignore current realities. A more balanced view of that history, he insists, dictates a reversal of Shaw and a return to the promise of both Reconstructions.


Author : Dr. Alveda C. King
Ginger Howard
Publisher : Stanton Publishing House
Release : 2020-08-18
Page : 192
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 :
Description :


Ginger Howard and Evangelist Alveda King approach the current discussions on race relations with prayer, candor and soul stirring testimonies.


Author : Kristen J. Warner
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2015-06-05
Page : 170
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1317700635
Description :


This book fills a significant gap in the critical conversation on race in media by extending interrogations of racial colorblindness in American television to the industrial practices that shape what we see on screen. Specifically, it frames the practice of colorblind casting as a potent lens for examining the interdependence of 21st century post-racial politics and popular culture. Applying a ‘production as culture’ approach to a series of casting case studies from American primetime dramatic television, including ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy and The CW’s The Vampire Diaries, Kristen Warner complicates our understanding of the cultural processes that inform casting and expounds the aesthetic and pragmatic industrial viewpoints that perpetuate limiting or downright exclusionary hiring norms. She also examines the material effects of actors of color who knowingly participate in this system and justify their limited roles as a consequence of employment, and finally speculates on what alternatives, if any, are available to correct these practices. Warner’s insights are a valuable addition to scholarship in media industry studies, critical race theory, ethnic studies, and audience reception, and will also appeal to those with a general interest in race in popular culture.


Author : Johnathan Harris
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2019-05-10
Page : 96
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 1947378147
Description :


Johnathan, a fifteen-year-old African American from Long Beach, California, shares his story of being physically and verbally harassed because of his race, and of overcoming the discrimination to embrace all cultures, and then to be proud of his own. Colorblind: A Story of Racism is the third in a series of graphic novels written by young adults for their peers. Johnathan Harris is fifteen, and lives in Long Beach, California, where he loves playing soccer with his friends, and listening to their favorite rapper, Snoop Dogg, a Long Beach native. His mom, dad, and three brothers are tight, but one of the most influential family members for Johnathan is his Uncle Russell, a convict in prison, serving fifteen years to life . . . Uncle Russell taught Johnathan from a very young age to see people from the perspective of their cultures, and not just their skin color. He imbued a pride of his ancestry and cautioned against letting hatred into his heart. But when Johnathan was just eight years old, something happened that filled him with fear and the very hatred that Uncle Russell had warned him about. What happened to Johnathan made him see that a dream of a colorless world was just that. A dream. That event shook him to his core. Anger grew inside him like a hot coal. Uncle Russell had told him to “throw it away or you will get burned,” but Johnathan was young and frightened. He was having a hard time forgiving, much less forgetting. Colorblind is Johnathan’s story of confronting his own racism and overcoming it. It is a story of hope and optimism that all, young and old, should heed. Zuiker Press is proud to publish stories about important current topics for kids and adolescents, written by their peers, that will help them cope with the challenges they face in today’s troubled world.


Author : Sarah Shin
Publisher : IVP Books
Release : 2017
Page : 204
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 9780830845156
Description :


While society may try to be colorblind, we can t ignore that God created us with our ethnic identities, and he made them for good. Ethnicity and evangelism specialist Sarah Shin reveals how our broken ethnic stories can be restored and redeemed, demonstrating God's power to others and bringing good news to the world. Discover how your ethnic story can be transformed for compelling witness and mission.


Author : Philip J. Mazzocco
Publisher : Springer
Release : 2017-06-07
Page : 205
Category : Psychology
ISBN 13 : 1137593024
Description :


This book summarizes and integrates the social scientific research on racial colorblindness, focusing primarily on work within the field of psychology. A new multi-variety colorblind framework is presented, which provides theoretical coherence to the present literature as well as a guide for future research. After considering the historical context in which colorblind ideologies have manifested and operated, research is presented that establishes how the colorblind mentality ignores important racial realities and tends to harm racial minorities across a wide variety of domains. Beneficial alternative ideologies are discussed, as are strategies that may be useful in challenging the colorblind ideology. This book will be of interest to both researchers and theorists who study racial ideology, as well as social justice advocates and practitioners who contend with racial colorblindness in real-world contexts.


Author : Kristen J. Warner
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2015-06-05
Page : 170
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1317700627
Description :


This book fills a significant gap in the critical conversation on race in media by extending interrogations of racial colorblindness in American television to the industrial practices that shape what we see on screen. Specifically, it frames the practice of colorblind casting as a potent lens for examining the interdependence of 21st century post-racial politics and popular culture. Applying a ‘production as culture’ approach to a series of casting case studies from American primetime dramatic television, including ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy and The CW’s The Vampire Diaries, Kristen Warner complicates our understanding of the cultural processes that inform casting and expounds the aesthetic and pragmatic industrial viewpoints that perpetuate limiting or downright exclusionary hiring norms. She also examines the material effects of actors of color who knowingly participate in this system and justify their limited roles as a consequence of employment, and finally speculates on what alternatives, if any, are available to correct these practices. Warner’s insights are a valuable addition to scholarship in media industry studies, critical race theory, ethnic studies, and audience reception, and will also appeal to those with a general interest in race in popular culture.


Author : Meghan Burke
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release : 2018-11-26
Page : 200
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1509524452
Description :


How can colorblindness – the idea that race does not matter – be racist? This illuminating book introduces the paradox of colorblind racism: how dismissing or downplaying the realities of race and racism can perpetuate inequality and violence. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches and real-life examples, Meghan Burke reveals colorblind racism to be an insidious presence in many areas of institutional and everyday life in the United States. She explains what is meant by colorblind racism, uncovers its role in the history of racial discrimination, and explores its effects on how we talk about and treat race today. The book also engages with recent critiques of colorblind racism to show the limitations of this framework and how a deeper, more careful study of colorblindness is needed to understand the persistence of racism and how it may be challenged. This accessible book will be an invaluable overview of a key phenomenon for students across the social sciences, and its far-reaching insights will appeal to all interested in the social life of race and racism.