Coyote America Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Dan Flores
Publisher : Basic Books
Release : 2017-09-05
Page : 288
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 9780465093724
Description :


Legends don't come close to capturing the incredible story of the coyote. In the face of centuries of annihilation campaigns that employed gases, helicopters, and engineered epidemics, coyotes didn't just survive, they thrived; expanding across the continent from Alaska to New York. In the war between humans and coyotes, coyotes have won, hands-down. Coyote America is the illuminating five million-year biography of this extraordinary animal, from its origins to its apotheosis. It is one of the great epics of our time.


Author : Dan Flores
Publisher : Basic Books
Release : 2016-06-07
Page : 288
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 0465098533
Description :


The New York Times best-selling account of how coyotes--long the target of an extermination policy--spread to every corner of the United States Finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award "A masterly synthesis of scientific research and personal observation." -Wall Street Journal Legends don't come close to capturing the incredible story of the coyote In the face of centuries of campaigns of annihilation employing gases, helicopters, and engineered epidemics, coyotes didn't just survive, they thrived, expanding across the continent from Alaska to New York. In the war between humans and coyotes, coyotes have won, hands-down. Coyote America is the illuminating five-million-year biography of this extraordinary animal, from its origins to its apotheosis. It is one of the great epics of our time.


Author : Dan Flores
Publisher : Hachette UK
Release : 2016-06-07
Page : 288
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 0465098533
Description :


The New York Times best-selling account of how coyotes--long the target of an extermination policy--spread to every corner of the United States Finalist for thePEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award "A masterly synthesis of scientific research and personal observation."-Wall Street Journal Legends don't come close to capturing the incredible story of the coyote In the face of centuries of campaigns of annihilation employing gases, helicopters, and engineered epidemics, coyotes didn't just survive, they thrived, expanding across the continent from Alaska to New York. In the war between humans and coyotes, coyotes have won, hands-down. Coyote America is the illuminating five-million-year biography of this extraordinary animal, from its origins to its apotheosis. It is one of the great epics of our time.


Author : Dan Flores
Publisher :
Release : 2016-06-07
Page : 288
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 0465052991
Description :


This book "is both an environmental and a deep natural history of the coyote. It traces both the five-million-year-long biological story of an animal that has become the wolf in our backyards, as well as its cultural evolution from a preeminent spot in Native American religions to the hapless foil of the Road Runner. A deeply American tale, the story of the coyote in the American West and beyond is a sort of Manifest Destiny in reverse, with a pioneering hero whose career holds up an uncanny mirror to the successes and failures of American expansionism"--Dust jacket flap.


Author :
Publisher : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Release : 1994
Page : 32
Category : Juvenile Fiction
ISBN 13 : 9780152019587
Description :


Coyote, who has a nose for trouble, insists that the crows teach him how to fly, but the experience ends in disaster for him.


Author : Hope Ryden
Publisher : iUniverse
Release : 2005-05
Page : 340
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 0595350364
Description :


For two years naturalist/photographer Hope Ryden camped in remote areas of the West observing and photographing coyotes. With eloquence and clarity, she describes the private life of this much-maligned animal in a book that has been heralded as the classic treatise on the subject. While observing her controversial subjects, Hope endured hardships and peril, events she weaves into her beautiful story. "As full of charm and tenacious inquisitiveness as the appealing animal she pleads to see allowed to live." -The Washington Post "A faultless and reasoned attitude." -The New York Times


Author : Dan Flores
Publisher :
Release : 2017-01-16
Page : 222
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9780700624669
Description :


America’s Great Plains once possessed one of the grandest wildlife spectacles of the world, equaled only by such places as the Serengeti, the Masai Mara, or the veld of South Africa. Pronghorn antelope, gray wolves, bison, coyotes, wild horses, and grizzly bears: less than two hundred years ago these creatures existed in such abundance that John James Audubon was moved to write, “it is impossible to describe or even conceive the vast multitudes of these animals.” In a work that is at once a lyrical evocation of that lost splendor and a detailed natural history of these charismatic species of the historic Great Plains, veteran naturalist and outdoorsman Dan Flores draws a vivid portrait of each of these animals in their glory—and tells the harrowing story of what happened to them at the hands of market hunters and ranchers and ultimately a federal killing program in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Great Plains with its wildlife intact dazzled Americans and Europeans alike, prompting numerous literary tributes. American Serengeti takes its place alongside these celebratory works, showing us the grazers and predators of the plains against the vast opalescent distances, the blue mountains shimmering on the horizon, the great rippling tracts of yellowed grasslands. Far from the empty “flyover country” of recent times, this landscape is alive with a complex ecology at least 20,000 years old—a continental patrimony whose wonders may not be entirely lost, as recent efforts hold out hope of partial restoration of these historic species. Written by an author who has done breakthrough work on the histories of several of these animals—including bison, wild horses, and coyotes—American Serengeti is as rigorous in its research as it is intimate in its sense of wonder—the most deeply informed, closely observed view we have of the Great Plains’ wild heritage.


Author : Ted Conover
Publisher : Vintage
Release : 1987
Page : 264
Category : Political Science
ISBN 13 : 0394755189
Description :


Disguised as an illegal alien, the author explores the outlaw realm of illegal immigration at the Mexican-American border and describes the role of the coyotes--mercenaries who sneak Mexican laborers into America


Author : Joanne Mattern
Publisher : Capstone
Release : 1999
Page : 48
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 9780736884853
Description :


Details the characteristics, habitats, and life cycle of the coyote. Includes photo diagram.


Author : Barry Holstun Lopez
Publisher : Andrews McMeel Publishing
Release : 2013-06-25
Page : 186
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1449451101
Description :


Prankster, warrior, seducer, fool – Old Man Coyote is the most enduring legend in Native American culture. Crafty and cagey – often the victim of his own magical intrigues and lusty appetites – he created the earth and man, scrambled the stars and first brought fire . . . and death. Barry Lopez – National Book Award-winning author of Arctic Dreams and recipient of the John Burroughs Medal for his bestselling masterwork Of Wolves and Men – has collected sixty-eight tales from forty-two tribes, and brings to life a timeless myth that abounds with sly wit, erotic adventure, and rueful wisdom.


Author : Gavin Van Horn
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2018-10-05
Page : 224
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 022644161X
Description :


A hiking trail through majestic mountains. A raw, unpeopled wilderness stretching as far as the eye can see. These are the settings we associate with our most famous books about nature. But Gavin Van Horn isn’t most nature writers. He lives and works not in some perfectly remote cabin in the woods but in a city—a big city. And that city has offered him something even more valuable than solitude: a window onto the surprising attractiveness of cities to animals. What was once in his mind essentially a nature-free blank slate turns out to actually be a bustling place where millions of wild things roam. He came to realize that our own paths are crisscrossed by the tracks and flyways of endangered black-crowned night herons, Cooper’s hawks, brown bats, coyotes, opossums, white-tailed deer, and many others who thread their lives ably through our own. With The Way of Coyote, Gavin Van Horn reveals the stupendous diversity of species that can flourish in urban landscapes like Chicago. That isn’t to say city living is without its challenges. Chicago has been altered dramatically over a relatively short timespan—its soils covered by concrete, its wetlands drained and refilled, its river diverted and made to flow in the opposite direction. The stories in The Way of Coyote occasionally lament lost abundance, but they also point toward incredible adaptability and resilience, such as that displayed by beavers plying the waters of human-constructed canals or peregrine falcons raising their young atop towering skyscrapers. Van Horn populates his stories with a remarkable range of urban wildlife and probes the philosophical and religious dimensions of what it means to coexist, drawing frequently from the wisdom of three unconventional guides—wildlife ecologist Aldo Leopold, Taoist philosopher Lao Tzu, and the North American trickster figure Coyote. Ultimately, Van Horn sees vast potential for a more vibrant collective of ecological citizens as we take our cues from landscapes past and present. Part urban nature travelogue, part philosophical reflection on the role wildlife can play in waking us to a shared sense of place and fate, The Way of Coyote is a deeply personal journey that questions how we might best reconcile our own needs with the needs of other creatures in our shared urban habitats.


Author : Lisa Petrillo
Publisher : Mitchell Lane
Release : 2019-09-04
Page : 24
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 1545746524
Description :


Coyotes bark, yap, and howl to talk to one another. They are cousins to dogs and run as fast as a car. Look inside All About North American Coyotes to read and learn where they live, what they eat, and how they care for baby coyotes. Coyotes is one of 18 books in our Animals Around the World series. Each title is beautifully illustrated with large, close-up photographs. Be sure to check out all 18!


Author : Steven W. Hackel
Publisher : UNC Press Books
Release : 2017-01-15
Page : 496
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0807839019
Description :


Recovering lost voices and exploring issues intimate and institutional, this sweeping examination of Spanish California illuminates Indian struggles against a confining colonial order and amidst harrowing depopulation. To capture the enormous challenges Indians confronted, Steven W. Hackel integrates textual and quantitative sources and weaves together analyses of disease and depopulation, marriage and sexuality, crime and punishment, and religious, economic, and political change. As colonization reduced their numbers and remade California, Indians congregated in missions, where they forged communities under Franciscan oversight. Yet missions proved disastrously unhealthful and coercive, as Franciscans sought control over Indians' beliefs and instituted unfamiliar systems of labor and punishment. Even so, remnants of Indian groups still survived when Mexican officials ended Franciscan rule in the 1830s. Many regained land and found strength in ancestral cultures that predated the Spaniards' arrival. At this study's heart are the dynamic interactions in and around Mission San Carlos Borromeo between Monterey region Indians (the Children of Coyote) and Spanish missionaries, soldiers, and settlers. Hackel places these local developments in the context of the California mission system and draws comparisons between California and other areas of the Spanish Borderlands and colonial America. Concentrating on the experiences of the Costanoan and Esselen peoples during the colonial period, Children of Coyote concludes with an epilogue that carries the story of their survival to the present day.


Author : Carol Cartaino
Publisher : Menasha Ridge Press
Release : 2010-10-01
Page : 192
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 9780897328722
Description :


Coyotes hold a peculiar interest as both an enduring symbol of the wild and a powerful predator we are always anxious to avoid. This book examines the spread of coyotes across the country over the past century, and the storm of concern and controversy that has followed. Individual chapters cover the surprisingly complex question of how to identify a coyote, the real and imagined dangers they pose, their personality and lifestyle, and nondeadly ways of discouraging them.


Author : W. Michael Gear
Publisher : Forge Books
Release : 2006-10-03
Page : 672
Category : Fiction
ISBN 13 : 1466823542
Description :


Upper Missouri River, 1825 Against the wild grandeur of the Rocky mountains and a richly woven tapestry of Indian cultures--Sioux, Mandan, Crow, Shoshoni--Coyote Summer unfolds into an unforgettable tale of love and reconciliation, destiny, and the indomitable spirit. No two people could be more different: Heals Like A Willow, a beautiful young Shoshoni medicine woman, and Richard Hamilton, a Harvard philosophy student new to the frontier. Though they come from worlds apart, hindered by vastly different cultures, their souls have met and will not be denied. But Willow has ties to the Spirit world and a responsibility to her people. In visions she has seen the coming White Storm brewing in the East--the endless stream of settlers overrunning the land, pouring ever westward. She must leave the trading posts, the river, and the company of white men. Even if it means leaving behind the one who has taken her heart. Armed only with his philosophy, meaningless in the harsh reality of the Rockies, Richard sets out after her. Facing the endless expanse of mountains and snow, a new understanding dawns on Richard--that his desperate search for love and illumination may bear the ultimate price. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.


Author : Jonathan Brennan
Publisher : University of Illinois Press
Release : 2003
Page : 307
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780252028199
Description :


An exploration of the literature, history, and culture of people of mixed African American and Native American descent, When Brer Rabbit Meets Coyote is the first book to theorize an African-Native American literary tradition. In examining this overlooked tradition, the book prompts a reconsideration of interracial relations in American history and literature. Jonathan Brennan, in a sweeping historical and analytical introduction to this collection of essays, surveys several centuries of literature in the context of the historical and cultural exchange and development of distinct African-Native American traditions. Positing a new African-Native American literary theory, he illuminates the roles subjectivity, situational identities, and strategic discourse play in defining African-Native American literatures. Brennan provides a thorough background to the literary tradition and a valuable overview to topics discussed in the essays. He examines African-Native American political and historical texts, travel narratives, and the Mardi Gras Indian tradition, suggesting that this evolving oral tradition parallels the development of numerous Black Indian literary traditions in the United States and Latin America.


Author : Pablo Mitchell
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2008-08-04
Page : 224
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780226532523
Description :


With the arrival of the transcontinental railroad in the 1880s came the emergence of a modern and profoundly multicultural New Mexico. Native Americans, working-class Mexicans, elite Hispanos, and black and white newcomers all commingled and interacted in the territory in ways that had not been previously possible. But what did it mean to be white in this multiethnic milieu? And how did ideas of sexuality and racial supremacy shape ideas of citizenry and determine who would govern the region? Coyote Nation considers these questions as it explores how New Mexicans evaluated and categorized racial identities through bodily practices. Where ethnic groups were numerous and—in the wake of miscegenation—often difficult to discern, the ways one dressed, bathed, spoke, gestured, or even stood were largely instrumental in conveying one's race. Even such practices as cutting one's hair, shopping, drinking alcohol, or embalming a deceased loved one could inextricably link a person to a very specific racial identity. A fascinating history of an extraordinarily plural and polyglot region, Coyote Nation will be of value to historians of race and ethnicity in American culture.


Author : Michael D. Wise
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 2016-08-01
Page : 216
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0803290462
Description :


In Producing Predators, Michael D. Wise argues that contestations between Native and non-Native people over hunting, labor, and the livestock industry drove the development of predator eradication programs in Montana and Alberta from the 1880s onward. The history of these anti-predator programs was significant not only for their ecological effects, but also for their enduring cultural legacies of colonialism in the Northern Rockies. By targeting wolves and other wild carnivores for extermination, cattle ranchers disavowed the predatory labor of raising domestic animals for slaughter, representing it instead as productive work. Meanwhile, federal agencies sought to purge the Blackfoot, Salish-Kootenai, and other indigenous peoples of their so-called predatory behaviors through campaigns of assimilation and citizenship that forcefully privatized tribal land and criminalized hunting and its related ritual practices. Despite these colonial pressures, Native communities resisted and negotiated the terms of their dispossession by representing their own patterns of work, food, and livelihood as productive. By exploring predation and production as fluid cultural logics for valuing labor, rather than just a set of biological processes, Producing Predators offers a new perspective on the history of the American West and the modern history of colonialism more broadly.


Author : Mourning Dove
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 1990-01-01
Page : 246
Category : Fiction
ISBN 13 : 9780803281691
Description :


These tales feature Mole, Coyote's wife, Chipmunk, Owl-Woman, Fox, and others


Author : Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Publisher : Inner Traditions / Bear & Co
Release : 2005-03
Page : 240
Category : Body, Mind & Spirit
ISBN 13 : 9781591430292
Description :


Explores the healing powers of stories passed down over time in Native American culture and describes how we can apply this wisdom to empower and transform our own lives. Original.