Death Penalty Sentencing Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : National Research Council
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education
Publisher : National Academies Press
Release : 2012-05-26
Page : 144
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 0309254167
Description :


Many studies during the past few decades have sought to determine whether the death penalty has any deterrent effect on homicide rates. Researchers have reached widely varying, even contradictory, conclusions. Some studies have concluded that the threat of capital punishment deters murders, saving large numbers of lives; other studies have concluded that executions actually increase homicides; still others, that executions have no effect on murder rates. Commentary among researchers, advocates, and policymakers on the scientific validity of the findings has sometimes been acrimonious. Against this backdrop, the National Research Council report Deterrence and the Death Penalty assesses whether the available evidence provides a scientific basis for answering questions of if and how the death penalty affects homicide rates. This new report from the Committee on Law and Justice concludes that research to date on the effect of capital punishment on homicide rates is not useful in determining whether the death penalty increases, decreases, or has no effect on these rates. The key question is whether capital punishment is less or more effective as a deterrent than alternative punishments, such as a life sentence without the possibility of parole. Yet none of the research that has been done accounted for the possible effect of noncapital punishments on homicide rates. The report recommends new avenues of research that may provide broader insight into any deterrent effects from both capital and noncapital punishments.


Author : Diane P. Robertson
Publisher : iUniverse
Release : 2002
Page : 418
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0595215726
Description :


In Tears From Heaven; Voices From Hell capital punishment issues are discussed from the viewpoint of the victims of violent crime and from those condemned to die on America's death rows. Explore the pros and cons of this controversial issue from those who have experienced the pain first hand: victims and death row inmates.


Author : Megan Manzano
Publisher : Greenhaven Publishing LLC
Release : 2017-12-15
Page : 120
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 1534502130
Description :


Is capital punishment morally justified? Although the issue generates strong opinions, there are no easy answers when it comes to taking the life of a human being. Supporters of the death penalty believe it deters law-breaking and is the only punishment strong enough for horrific crimes such as child murder and genocide. Opponents argue that it violates human rights and point to its finality in the face of judicial system error and unfairness. This resource presents a fascinating progression of current viewpoints that reflect the many facets of the death penalty debate.


Author : Maurice Chammah
Publisher : Crown
Release : 2021-01-26
Page : 368
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1524760277
Description :


NEW YORK TIMES EDITORS’ CHOICE • A deeply reported, searingly honest portrait of the death penalty in Texas—and what it tells us about crime and punishment in America “Remarkably intimate, fair-minded, and trustworthy reporting on the people arguing over the fate of human life.”—Robert Kolker, New York Times bestselling author of Hidden Valley Road: Inside the Mind of an American Family WINNER OF THE J. ANTHONY LUKAS WORK-IN-PROGRESS AWARD In 1972, the United States Supreme Court made a surprising ruling: the country's death penalty system violated the Constitution. The backlash was swift, especially in Texas, where executions were considered part of the cultural fabric, and a dark history of lynching was masked by gauzy visions of a tough-on-crime frontier. When executions resumed, Texas quickly became the nationwide leader in carrying out the punishment. Then, amid a larger wave of criminal justice reform, came the death penalty’s decline, a trend so durable that even in Texas the punishment appears again close to extinction. In Let the Lord Sort Them, Maurice Chammah charts the rise and fall of capital punishment through the eyes of those it touched. We meet Elsa Alcala, the orphaned daughter of a Mexican American family who found her calling as a prosecutor in the nation's death penalty capital, before becoming a judge on the state's highest court. We meet Danalynn Recer, a lawyer who became obsessively devoted to unearthing the life stories of men who committed terrible crimes, and fought for mercy in courtrooms across the state. We meet death row prisoners—many of them once-famous figures like Henry Lee Lucas, Gary Graham, and Karla Faye Tucker—along with their families and the families of their victims. And we meet the executioners, who struggle openly with what society has asked them to do. In tracing these interconnected lives against the rise of mass incarceration in Texas and the country as a whole, Chammah explores what the persistence of the death penalty tells us about forgiveness and retribution, fairness and justice, history and myth. Written with intimacy and grace, Let the Lord Sort Them is the definitive portrait of a particularly American institution.


Author : Welsh S. White
Publisher : University of Michigan Press
Release : 1991
Page : 223
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 9780472064618
Description :


An up-to-date examination of legal changes and shifting attitudes surrounding capital punishment


Author : Sarah Beth Kaufman
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 2020-05-19
Page : 260
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0520975502
Description :


As the death penalty clings to life in many states and dies off in others, this first-of-its-kind ethnography takes readers inside capital trials across the United States. Sarah Beth Kaufman draws on years of ethnographic and documentary research, including hundreds of hours of courtroom observation in seven states, interviews with participants, and analyses of newspaper coverage to reveal how the American justice system decides who deserves the most extreme punishment. The “super due process” accorded capital sentencing by the United States Supreme Court is the system’s best attempt at individuated sentencing. Resources not seen in most other parts of the criminal justice system, such as jurors and psychological experts, are required in capital trials, yet even these cannot create the conditions of morality or justice. Kaufman demonstrates that capital trials ultimately depend on performance and politics, resulting in the enactment of deep biases and utter capriciousness. American Roulette contends that the liberal, democratic ideals of criminal punishment cannot be enacted in the current criminal justice system, even under the most controlled circumstances.


Author : Hugo Adam Bedau
Publisher :
Release : 1984
Page : 27
Category : Capital punishment
ISBN 13 : 9780914031017
Description :



Author : Brandon L. Garrett
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release : 2017-09-25
Page : 310
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 0674981960
Description :


Today, death sentences in the U.S. are as rare as lightning strikes. Brandon Garrett shows us the reasons why, and explains what the failed death penalty experiment teaches about the effect of inept lawyering, overzealous prosecution, race discrimination, wrongful convictions, and excessive punishments throughout the criminal justice system.


Author : Stephen P. Garvey
Neal Devins
Publisher : Duke University Press
Release : 2003
Page : 244
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 9780822330431
Description :


A collection of essays on capital punishment reflects on the most recent legal developments and procedures, considering such topics as the public's opinion about the death penalty, its practice in light of international human rights laws, the execution of innocent people, and the role of race bias. Simultaneous.


Author : United States. General Accounting Office
Publisher :
Release : 1990
Page : 13
Category : Capital punishment
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Sarah Beth Kaufman
Publisher : University of California Press
Release : 2020-05-19
Page : 260
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0520344391
Description :


As the death penalty clings to life in many states and dies off in others, this first-of-its-kind ethnography takes readers inside capital trials across the United States. Sarah Beth Kaufman draws on years of ethnographic and documentary research, including hundreds of hours of courtroom observation in seven states, interviews with participants, and analyses of newspaper coverage to reveal how the American justice system decides who deserves the most extreme punishment. The “super due process” accorded capital sentencing by the United States Supreme Court is the system’s best attempt at individuated sentencing. Resources not seen in most other parts of the criminal justice system, such as jurors and psychological experts, are required in capital trials, yet even these cannot create the conditions of morality or justice. Kaufman demonstrates that capital trials ultimately depend on performance and politics, resulting in the enactment of deep biases and utter capriciousness. American Roulette contends that the liberal, democratic ideals of criminal punishment cannot be enacted in the current criminal justice system, even under the most controlled circumstances.


Author : Raymond Paternoster
Publisher :
Release : 1991
Page : 307
Category : Capital punishment
ISBN 13 :
Description :


In the 1970s and the 1980s, polls in the United States showed approval of the death penalty growing consistently, with nearly 80 percent of the public favoring capital punishment for murderers in 1988. Yet during the last decade, when approximately 300 persons were sentenced to the death penalty each year, an average of only ten were executed each year. And those deaths that did occur were normally delayed for eight years after sentencing. What explains these significant refusals to implement policies of capital punishment? Raymond Paternoster demonstrates conclusively that despite the public's desire to punish criminals, to protect ourselves, to spend tax dollars effectively, and to compensate victims' families, we are reluctant to actually take the lives of prisoners, and, in fact, that most Americans would choose to abolish capital punishment if they knew of an effective alternative. That alternative, Paternoster asserts, is to replace the death penalty with sentences of life without parole, along with mandatory financial restitution to the victim's survivors. This policy would ensure that convicted murderers receive harsh punishment, and with parole forbidden in all cases, the public would be protected from any future crimes such criminals could commit. Paternoster shows that life sentences may actually be less expensive than execution and a more effective deterrent than the infrequently imposed death penalty. In addition, life sentences could require prisoners to pay a portion of their prison wages to their victims' survivors. Most importantly, such a policy would ensure that the government does not execute innocent people. Paternoster's well-documented book argues cogently against capital punishment as an appropriate and effective response to murderers and offers a sound alternative that addresses the public's demand for justice, safety, and restitution.


Author : Robert M. Bohm
Publisher : Anderson Publishing Company
Release : 1991
Page : 148
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Charles J. Ogletree, Jr.
Austin Sarat
Publisher : NYU Press
Release : 2012-06-04
Page : 352
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 0814723993
Description :


Is life without parole the perfect compromise to the death penalty? Or is it as ethically fraught as capital punishment? This comprehensive, interdisciplinary anthology treats life without parole as “the new death penalty.” Editors Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. and Austin Sarat bring together original work by prominent scholars in an effort to better understand the growth of life without parole and its social, cultural, political, and legal meanings. What justifies the turn to life imprisonment? How should we understand the fact that this penalty is used disproportionately against racial minorities? What are the most promising avenues for limiting, reforming, or eliminating life without parole sentences in the United States? Contributors explore the structure of life without parole sentences and the impact they have on prisoners, where the penalty fits in modern theories of punishment, and prospects for (as well as challenges to) reform.


Author : Ken Leyton-Brown
Publisher : UBC Press
Release : 2010-04-10
Page : 216
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0774859326
Description :


It is easy to forget that the death penalty was an accepted aspect of Canadian culture and criminal justice until 1976. The Practice of Execution in Canada is not about what led some to the gallows and others to escape it. Rather, it examines how the routine rituals and practices of execution can be seen as a crucial social institution. Drawing on hundreds of case files, Ken Leyton-Brown shows that from trial to interment, the practice of execution was constrained by law and tradition. Despite this, however, the institution was not rigid. Criticism and reform pushed executions out of the public eye, and in so doing, stripped them of meaningful ritual and made them more vulnerable to criticism.


Author : Richard Rosenfeld
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2010-05-01
Page : 22
Category :
ISBN 13 : 019980544X
Description :


This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of criminology find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In criminology, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Criminology, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study and practice of criminology. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.


Author : Roger Hood CBE QC (Hon) DCL FBA
Carolyn Hoyle
Publisher : OUP Oxford
Release : 2008-03-27
Page : 504
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 0191021733
Description :


The 4th edition of this authoritative study of the death penalty, now written jointly with Carolyn Hoyle, brings up-to-date developments in the movement to abolish the death penalty worldwide. It draws on Roger Hood's experience as consultant to the United Nations for the UN Secretary General's five-yearly surveys of capital punishment and on the latest information from non-governmental organizations and the academic literature. Not only have many more countries abolished capital punishment but, even amongst those that retain it, the majority have been carrying out fewer executions. Legal challenges to the mandatory capital punishment have been successful, as has the pressure to abolish the death penalty for those who commit a capital crime when under the age of 18. This edition has more to say about the prospects that China will restrict and control the number of executions 'on the road to abolition'. Yet, despite such advances, this book reveals many human rights abuses where the death penalty still exists. In some countries a wide range of crimes are still subject to capital punishment, and the authorities too often fail to meet the safeguards embodied in international human rights treaties to safeguard those facing the death penalty. There is evidence of police abuse, unfair trials, lack of access to competent defence counsel, excessive periods of time spent on in horrible conditions on 'death row', and public, painful forms of execution. The authors engage with the latest debates on the realities of capital punishment, especially its justification as a uniquely effective deterrent; whether it can ever be administered equitably, without discrimination or error; and what influence relatives of victims should have in sentencing and on the public debate. For the first time, it also discussing the problem of devising an alternative to capital punishment, especially life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.


Author : Gary E. McCuen
Publisher : Gem Publications
Release : 1997
Page : 168
Category : Capital punishment
ISBN 13 : 9780865961401
Description :


An examination of the death penalty, including the history, methods, racial bias and the disadvantaged.


Author : Victor L. Streib
Publisher : West Academic
Release : 2005
Page : 309
Category : Law
ISBN 13 :
Description :


Covering both the substantive law and the procedural law of the death penalty, this title begins with the arguments for and against the death penalty and an explanation of its basic constitutional challenges and limitations. Major sections cover capital crimes and defenses, as well as trial level and post-trial procedural issues. Special topics such as race and gender bias and executing the innocent are included, as well as a section on international and foreign law issues. This Nutshell serves both as supplemental reading for students in death penalty courses and as a concise, narrative explanation of death penalty law.


Author : Jerry Bledsoe
Publisher : Diversion Books
Release : 2014-05-18
Page : 432
Category : True Crime
ISBN 13 : 1626812888
Description :


In this “true story that reads like a novel,” the #1 New York Times–bestselling author reveals the facts behind a notorious Southern murder case (Library Journal). When North Carolina farmer Stuart Taylor died after a sudden illness, his forty-six-year-old fiancée, Velma Barfield, was overcome with grief. Taylor’s family grieved with her—until the autopsy revealed traces of arsenic poisoning. Turned over to the authorities by her own son, Velma stunned her family with more revelations. This wasn’t the first time she had committed cold-blooded murder, and she would eventually be tried by the “world’s deadliest prosecutor” and sentenced to death. This book probes Velma’s stark descent into madness, her prescription drug addiction, and her effort to turn her life around through Christianity. From her harrowing childhood to the crimes that incited a national debate over the death penalty, to the final moments of her execution, Velma Barfield’s life of crime and punishment, revenge and redemption, this is crime reporting at its most gripping and profound. “A painfully intimate, moving story about the life and death of the only woman executed in the U.S. between 1962–1998 . . . With graceful writing and thorough reporting, it makes the reader look hard at something dark and sad in the human soul . . . Breathes new life into the true crime genre.” —The News & Observer “Undertakes to answer the questions about the justice system and the motives that drive women to kill.” —The Washington Post Book World “An extraordinary piece of writing . . . The most chilling description of a legal execution that we are ever likely to get.” —Citizen-Times “Taut and engrossing on the nature of justice and the death penalty as well as on guilt and responsibility.” —Booklist