Good Faith And Insurance Contracts Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Peter MacDonald Eggers
Simon Picken
Publisher : Taylor & Francis
Release : 2017-12-06
Page : 742
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1351984004
Description :


Good Faith and Insurance Contracts sets out an exhaustive analysis of the law concerning the duty of utmost good faith, as applied to insurance contracts. Now in its fourth edition, it has been updated to address the arrival of the Insurance Act 2015, as well as any references to new case law. In addition, it synthesises all known judicial decisions by the English Courts concerning good faith in this area. This book is still the only text devoted to a discussion of the duty of utmost good faith applicable to insurance contracts. As good faith is an issue which arises in respect of all insurance contracts, it is a book which will be extremely useful to lawyers involved in insurance as well as insurance practitioners.


Author : Roger Brownsword
Norma J. Hird
Publisher : Dartmouth Publishing Company
Release : 1999
Page : 326
Category : Law
ISBN 13 :
Description :


In many legal systems around the world, whether civilian or common law, the doctrine of good faith is recognised as one of the general principles of contract law. By contrast, English law has taken a different approach, relying on a number of specific doctrines aimed at securing fair dealing but eschewing any general principle of good faith in contract. In the light of recent good faith provisions - such as those found in the EC Directives on Commercial Agents and on Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts, as well as in the Lando Commission's 'Principles of European Contract Law' and the UNIDROIT 'Principles of International Commercial Contracts' - it is open to debate whether the English law of contract can, or indeed should, maintain its traditional approach.The purpose of the essays in this collection is to inform such a debate in two principal ways: first, by drawing out the competing conceptions (and concomitant credentials) of the idea of good faith in contract; and, secondly, by exploring the role of good faith in different contexts - for example, in the context of both consumer and commercial contracting, but also in the context of specific fields of contract law (such as insurance and financial services), particular patterns of doctrinal response to bad faith and unfair dealing and the various traditions of legal reasoning found around the world.The essays represent a significant international engagement with a question that is by no means of interest only to English lawyers. For, the perspectives presented by the European, Nordic, Israeli, North American, South African and Australian contributors to this book serve to illuminate our understanding of the idea of good faith whether our concern is with our own local legal system or, beyond that, with the elaboration of principles of contract law for regional or global application.


Author : Julie-Ann Tarr
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2013-03-04
Page : 270
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1135337705
Description :


This book provides an in-depth examination of the theoretical,legal, social and economic foundations to disclosure and concealment of information in relation to the formation of consumer insurance contracts. A comparative treatment of this issue is undertaken with particular attention given to the judicial and legislative approaches adopted in the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Australia and New Zealand. It will be relevant to those researching and studying insurance law, all legal practitioners involved with the formation of consumer insurance contracts and non-legal practitioners working within the field of insurance.


Author : ADM Forte
Angelo D. M. Forte
Publisher : Hart Publishing
Release : 1999
Page : 211
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1841130478
Description :


Good faith is already a familiar concept in international commercial law and a recognised principle of substantive law in several major legal systems. In the United Kingdom,however, a role for good faith and, more fundamentally, the issue of whether or not there ought to be a general principle of good faith informing English and Scots contract and property law, are still matters for debate. This book, containing the papers delivered at the Symposium on Good Faith in Contract and Property Law held in Aberdeen University in October 1998, engages in that critical debate. While its central core reflects on good faith from the perspective of a mixed legal system (Scots Law), papers on good faith from an English and European perspective locate the debate, properly, within a broader jurisdictional context.


Author : Haemala Thanasegaran
Publisher :
Release : 2009
Page : 834
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :


This thesis evaluates whether the duty of utmost good faith (the cornerstone of insurance contracts) is effectively regulated and in tum, observed by insurers and insureds alike in Malaysia. This is researched by evaluating the adequacy of the Insurance Act 1996 (Malaysia) and the Takaful Act 1984 (Malaysia), along with the supporting infrastructure and measures introduced by the Malaysian government in providing for the adherence to the duty of utmost good faith throughout the various stages of the insurance contract. The duty of utmost good faith is of a continuing nature spanning from the pre-contractual stage right through to claims settlement. During this period, the duty is imposed on insurers, insureds and intermediaries such as agents and brokers with respect to the requirement of disclosure and representation of material facts; construction of policy terms; and claims settlement practices. The thesis evaluates this duty from both a doctrinal as well as social science perspective, in order to propose suitable legal reform. The former is undertaken by means of a comparative analysis of the Malaysian position with other common law jurisdictions, mainly the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Singapore, throughout the various stages of an insurance contract. The latter analyses the position in Malaysia, and proposes reform from a socio-economic perspective. Socio-cultural perspectives are considered because they underpin the effectiveness or otherwise of a legal system (and by analogy any law). Thus, the thesis examines Malaysian legal culture to ascertain whether it supports the existing insurance law and structure or it calls for reform. Economic perspectives are considered to weigh the cost and benefits of the current position and proposed reforms. The thesis finds that reforms are needed to improve Malaysian law and practice regulating utmost good faith in insurance contracts. The reforms need to cover substantive and procedural issues relating to non-disclosure, misrepresentation of material facts, the role and influence of intermediaries in respect of disclosure, claims handling and settlement practices, and enhancement in the role of mediation in settling insurance disputes. The thesis proposes reforms on these issues.


Author : Haemala Thanasegaran
Publisher : Springer
Release : 2016-01-22
Page : 233
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 9811003831
Description :


This book examines good faith in non-marine insurance and takaful (Islamic insurance) contracts in Malaysia, and proposes holistic law reform of the same. The first two-thirds of the book comprise an extensive comparative legal analysis of the issues between Malaysia, Australia and the United Kingdom, with the final third dedicated to a socio-economic analysis of law reform and suggestions for law reform particularly suited to Malaysia. The book evaluates whether the duty of utmost good faith (the cornerstone of insurance and takaful contracts) is effectively regulated and, in turn, observed by insurers (and takaful operators) and insureds alike in Malaysia. The adequacy of the Insurance Act 1996 (Malaysia), the Takaful Act 1984 (Malaysia), the Financial Services Act 2013 (Malaysia) and the Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 (Malaysia) is evaluated, along with the supporting infrastructure and oversight measures introduced by the Malaysian government. In doing so, The book examines the duty of utmost good faith from both a doctrinal and a social science perspective, in order to propose suitable legal reform.


Author : Shanmuganathan
Publisher : Partridge Publishing Singapore
Release : 2020-02-18
Page : 420
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1543752381
Description :


Principles of Insurance Law with Case Studies introduces the basics of insurance law and offers a comprehensive overview of the principles of insurance law. Written by a senior insurance professional, it provides valuable insight into key areas with case illustrations providing clarity throughout the book. The publication provides a thorough analysis of insurance principles and case laws. It includes issues confronting insurance lawyers and the insurance industry and analyses the positions of the courts in various jurisdictions. The chapters cover a wide range of topics which include: • The formation of the insurance contract. • Construction of the proposal form and the rules of evidence. • Acceptance of the proposal and premiums. • Cover notes and the certificate of insurance. • Insurable interests, risks and warranties. • Types of policies. • Interpretation of contracts of insurance. • The principle of good faith and the duty of disclosure. • Fraudulent misrepresentation and reliance. • Agents and inducement. • Standard of proof and pleadings.


Author : Martin Davies
Publisher :
Release : 2009
Page :
Category : Marine insurance
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Roderick S. W. Winsor
Publisher : Canada Law Book
Release : 2004
Page :
Category : Good faith (Law)
ISBN 13 : 9780888044655
Description :



Author : Malcolm Clarke
Baris Soyer
Publisher : CRC Press
Release : 2016-11-10
Page : 170
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1134832958
Description :


The Insurance Act 2015 represents the first major reform of English commercial insurance law for many years. Its impact will be felt not only in England, where it will greatly affect both maritime and commercial insurance practice, but also elsewhere where English law is the law of choice in insurance contracts. The Insurance Act 2015: A New Regime for Commercial and Marine Insurance Law analyses in depth the key aspects of the Act and extensively restates and modifies a number of legal principles applying both at common law and under the Marine Insurance Act 1906. Offering much more than the usual commentary on legislation, this book provides critical in-depth analysis of the important topics as was all coverage of areas likely to spawn disputes in future. Written by leading practitioners and academics in the field, this book offers comprehensive, coherent and practical legal analysis of the changes introduced by the Insurance Act 2015. It is a key point of reference for practitioners, insurance professionals and academics.


Author : John L Clark
Publisher :
Release : 2020-08-20
Page : 130
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :


A section-by-section critical comparison of the Marine Insurance Act 1906 and Insurance Act 2015, an analysis of the doctrine of uberrimæ fidei and a revision of selected cases brought before English courts both before and after the enactment of the new Act to identify a pattern of evolution towards modern adjudication of insurance matters. However, no suggestion for legislative reform is proffered herein. The Marine Insurance Act 1906 contains provisions dealing specifically with maritime matters which may be directly applicable to any contract of insurance by removing or replacing certain terms. The definition of a marine insurance contract in section 1, for example, "A contract of marine insurance is a contract whereby the insurer undertakes to indemnify the assured, in manner and to the extent thereby agreed, against marine losses, that is to say, the losses incident to marine adventure," could refer to any contract simply by deleting the word "marine." The bulk of the Marine Insurance Act articulates universal concepts and principles generally applicable to the entire insurance industry, namely disclosures and representations, warranties and loss, hence its global significance in that field for over a century, and its broad implementation and transposition in the legal systems of many Commonwealth nations. But despite its meticulousness and merits, a glaring point of contention is the infamous principle of uberrimæ fidei (or "utmost good faith") for insurance contracts set out in section 17, "A contract of marine insurance is a contract based upon the utmost good faith, and, if the utmost good faith be not observed by either party, the contract may be avoided by the other party," which originated in 1766 based on Lord Mansfield's comments in Carter v Boehm: "Insurance is a contract based upon speculation. The special facts, upon which the contingent chance is to be computed, lie most commonly in the knowledge of the insured only; the underwriter trusts to his representation and proceeds upon the confidence that he does not keep back any circumstance in his knowledge, to mislead the underwriter into a belief that the circumstance does not exist, and to induce him to estimate the risk as if it did not exist. Good faith forbids either party by concealing what he privately knows, to draw the other into a bargain from his ignorance of that fact, and his believing the contrary."Contrastingly, in a clear effort to democratise the legal framework for insurance contracts, the Insurance Act 2015 enshrines the duty of fair presentation in section 3, "Before a contract of insurance is entered into, the insured must make to the insurer a fair presentation of the risk," and effectively derogated the cumbersome "utmost good faith" precept to the dustbin of history in section 14, "Any rule of law permitting a party to a contract of insurance to avoid the contract on the ground that the utmost good faith has not been observed by the other party is abolished," boldly doing away with the archaic Latin expression. The Insurance Act also concisely provides for warranties and remedies for fraud in five succinct sections and abolishes so-called "basis of the contract" clauses in section 9, "This section applies to representations made by the insured [which are] not capable of being converted into a warranty by means of any provision of the non-consumer insurance contract (or of the terms of the variation), or of any other contract (and whether by declaring the representation to form the basis of the contract or otherwise)." by prohibiting the conversion of any representation by the insured into a warranty by means of contractual provision, which was originally obligated in Marine Insurance Act, section 35 (2), "An express warranty must be included in, or written upon, the policy, or must be contained in some document incorporated by reference into the policy."


Author : Julie-Anne Tarr
Publisher : Routledge Cavendish
Release : 2002
Page : 238
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1859417124
Description :


There is significant asymmetry of information and knowledge between insurers and insureds in relation to consumer insurance contracts involving home buildings, home contents, motor vehicle cover, travel, personal accident and consumer credit. In some respects, the insured is in a superior position - he or she is aware of the particular circumstances surrounding the subject matter of the insurance contract and any specific risks to which the property is exposed or where liability may be incurred. Conversely, the insurer is in an advantageous position as regards the scope and content of the insurance cover being sought. The insured is aware of the primary features of the transaction (such as the type of cover, the quantum of cover and the premium payable) but is unlikely to have a clear (or any) understanding of subordinate terms such as average clauses, subrogation provisions and the myriad of exclusions, excesses and limitations upon liability.


Author : Zhen Jing
Publisher : Taylor & Francis
Release : 2016-11-25
Page : 840
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1317802543
Description :


Chinese Insurance Contracts: Law and Practice is the first systematic text written in English on the law of insurance in China. This book offers a critical analysis of the major principles, doctrines and concepts of insurance contract law in China. At every point the analysis discusses the principles of the Insurance Law in detail, referring where appropriate to decided cases and also drawing attention to external influences. Readers are guided through the complexities of Chinese law in a clear and comprehensive fashion, and – significantly – in a manner that is accessible and meaningful for those used to a common law system. This book presents a comprehensive picture of Chinese insurance contract law, to facilitate a wider understanding of the relevant rules of law. Elements of insurance contract law are critically examined. In addition, this book presents rules of law on some special types of insurance contract, such as life insurance, property insurance, liability insurance, motor vehicle insurance, reinsurance, and marine insurance. The deficiencies and shortcomings of the law and practice will be identified and analysed; suggestions and recommendations on how to reform the law will be presented. Chinese Insurance Contracts also offers legal and practical advice to insurance professionals on how to draft clauses to avoid contractual pitfalls. It also uses cases to illustrate the difficulties which can arise in applying the principles in practice. This book will be essential reading for insurance companies and legal practitioners looking to do business in China, as well as reference for Chinese lawyers practising insurance law. It will also be a useful resource for students and academics studying Chinese law.


Author : Barry Zalma Esq
Publisher :
Release : 2020-12-25
Page : 182
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :


INSURANCE AS A NECESSITYNeither the courts nor the governmental agencies seem to be aware that in a modern, capitalistic society, insurance is a necessity. No prudent person would take the risk of starting a business, buying a home, or driving a car without insurance. The risk of losing everything would be too great. By using insurance to spread the risk, taking the risk to start a business, buy a home, or drive a car becomes possible.Insurance has existed since a group of Sumerian farmers, more than 5,000 years ago, scratched an agreement on a clay tablet that if one of their number lost his crop to storms, the others would pay part of their earnings to the one damaged. Over the eons, insurance has become more sophisticated, but the deal is essentially the same. An insurer, whether an individual or a corporate entity, takes contributions (premiums) from many and holds the money to pay those few who lose their property from some calamity, like fire. The agreement, a written contract to pay indemnity to another in case a certain problem, calamity, or damage that is fortuitous, that is that occurs by accident, is called insurance.In a modern industrial society, almost everyone is involved in or with the business of insurance. They insure against the risk of becoming ill, losing a car in an accident, losing business due to fire, becoming disabled, losing their life, losing a home due to flood or earthquake, or being sued for accidentally causing injury to another. The insurers, insureds, or people damaged by those insured are dependent on one another.In a country where human interactions are governed solely by the terms of written contracts, insurance would be a simple means of spreading risk and providing indemnity based on the promises made by the contract of insurance. But, in this the real world, insurance contracts are controlled by statutes enacted to ostensibly protect the consumer of insurance, regulations imposing obligations on the conduct of insurers and the decisions of trial and appellate courts interpreting insurance contracts.A simple insurance contract between two parties might say: "I insure you against the risk of loss of your engagement ring valued at $15,000 by all risks of direct physical loss except wear and tear for a premium paid by you of $15.00." Anyone who could read would understand that contract. If something happens to damage, destroy or lose the ring the insurer will pay you $15,000.00. However, insurers cannot write such a simple contract because the state requires many terms and conditions that complicate the policy wording and confuse the common person. The states and courts that did so had nothing but good intentions to protect the consumer against the insurer and control the actions of the insurer.The tort of bad faith was created because courts felt that insurers treated their insureds badly and defeated the purpose for which insurance is acquired. It has served its purpose. Fair Claims Settlement Practices laws and regulations are now available to control insurers who do not act in good faith. Insurance fraud statutes and Regulations provide assistance to insurers who have been deceived by those they insure or who are victims of attempted insurance fraud.It is time that all contracts, including insurance contracts, are treated like any other contract, and insureds who believe the insurer breached the contract of insurance can sue to recover the benefits promised by the policy. Insurers, who act unfairly can be controlled by the state Departments of Insurance who will deter wrongful conduct by fines and other discipline allowed by the Fair Claims Settlement Practices laws and regulations.


Author : Ozlem Gurses
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2016-08-12
Page : 424
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1317210336
Description :


Marine Insurance Law, Second Edition introduces and clearly explains all topics covered in courses at Masters level, offering students and those new to the area a comprehensive and accessible overview and way into this important topic in maritime law. Beginning by introducing the general principles of the subject and structure and formation of insurance contracts, this text goes on to look at individual considerations in detail, including – the duty of utmost good faith /fair presentation of the risk, insurable interest, terms of insurance contracts, brokers, the premium, causation and marine perils, losses, sue and labour, subrogation, fraudulent claims and reinsurance. This second edition reflects the substantial changes introduced by the Insurance Act 2015, and includes new Appendices containing relevant legislation and example clauses from marine insurance contracts.


Author : Larry A. DiMatteo
Chen Lei
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 2017-10-26
Page : 518
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 1107176328
Description :


A unique comparative analysis of Chinese Contract Law accessible to lawyers from civil, common, and mixed law jurisdictions.


Author : Frederick Gower Hawke
Publisher :
Release : 1993
Page : 226
Category : Good faith (Law)
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Michael Furmston
Publisher : Taylor & Francis
Release : 2020-05-10
Page : 260
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 0429508816
Description :


The Future of the Law of Contract brings together an impressive collection of essays on contract law. Taking a comparative approach, the aim of the book is to address how the law of contract will develop over the next 25 years, as well as considering the ways in which changes to the way that contracts are made will affect the law. Topics include good faith; objectivity; exclusion clauses; economic duress; variation of contract; contract and privacy law in a digital environment; technological change; Choice of Court Agreements; and Islamic finance contracts. The chapters are written by leading academics from England, Australia, Canada, the United States, Singapore and Malaysia. As such, this collection will be of global interest and importance to professionals, academics and students of contract law.


Author : Pierpaolo Marano
Kyriaki Noussia
Publisher : Springer Nature
Release : 2020-03-11
Page : 713
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 3030311988
Description :


This Volume of the AIDA Europe Research Series on Insurance Law and Regulation focuses on transparency as the guiding principle of modern insurance law. It consists of chapters written by leaders in the respective field, who address transparency in a range of civil and common law jurisdictions, along with overview chapters. Each chapter reviews the transparency principles applicable in the jurisdiction discussed. Whether expressly or impliedly, all jurisdictions recognize a duty on the part of the insured to make a fair presentation of the risk when submitting a proposal for cover to the insurers, although there is little consensus on the scope of that duty. Disputed matters in this regard include: whether it is satisfied by honest answers to express questions, or whether there is a spontaneous duty of disclosure; whether facts relating to the insured’s character, as opposed to the nature of the risk itself, are to be presented to the insurers; the role of insurance intermediaries in the placement process; and the remedy for breach of duty. Transparency is, however, a much wider concept. Potential policyholders are in principle entitled to be made aware of the key terms of coverage and to be warned of hidden traps (such as conditions precedent, average clauses and excess provisions), but there are a range of different approaches. Some jurisdictions have adopted a “soft law” approach, using codes of practice for pre-contract disclosure, while other jurisdictions employ the rather nebulous duty of (utmost) good faith. Leaving aside placement, transparency is also demanded after the policy has been incepted. The insured is required to be transparent during the claims process. There is less consistency in national legislation regarding the implementation of transparency by insurers in the context of handling claims.


Author :
Publisher :
Release :
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 : 0199731403
Description :