Juvenescence Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Robert Pogue Harrison
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2014-11-21
Page : 215
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 022617199X
Description :


Argues that humanity is growing steadily younger, as society retains more physical and mental characteristics of youth, which is a luxury required for flashes of genius and innovative drive.


Author : Jim Mellon
Al Chalabi
Publisher : Harriman House Limited
Release : 2017-09-25
Page : 438
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 0993047823
Description :



Author : Melinda Scott
Publisher : Dorrance Publishing
Release : 2020-06-01
Page : 84
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 1646108485
Description :


Juvenescence Outdoors: A Pocket Guide for Caretakers By: Melinda Scott Juvenescence Outdoors provides both classic and creative recreation ideas to entertain and teach children. Caretakers may often struggle to strategize and plan fulfilling activities for children. Melinda Scott shares experience gained from teaching and from raising her own children. She hopes to empower readers with an understanding of how the outdoors is the perfect place to raise happy children, whether rich or poor.


Author : Joyce Duenow
Publisher : iUniverse
Release : 2000-12-01
Page : 108
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 0595162878
Description :


Ever since Ponce de Leon landed in Florida, Americans have searched for the fountain of youth. What if it was as easy as changing your mind? I changed my mind and had a happier childhood by concentrating on the good events I remembered. Juvenescence is a combination collection of short, short stories from my childhood plus journal space to re-create your own true stories from childhood. My two oldest grandchildren literally pried these stories out of me during sleepovers. The re-creation of events helped this baby-boomer grandmother relive the good old days and apply these lessons to my life today. With the popularity of journaling currently at an all-time high, I created the first combination journal/autobiography. In addition the book features my own 35 mm photographs of my own eight grandchildren. Juvenescence is a tribute to these eight grandchildren and to my own two children who created these special gifts from God. It is also a tribute to the 1950s Minnesota family farm. Produced in rich sepia-toned photography on cream-colored paper stock, the book will recapture the mellowness of the 1950s we babyboomers love to fondly recall. And it will also capture the unconditional love gained when grandchildren enter you life. Truly the best comes last


Author : David Hunter
Publisher : Createspace Independent Pub
Release : 2012-03-01
Page : 552
Category : Fiction
ISBN 13 : 9781470176198
Description :


The bone-chilling reality of missing children, including the mayor's three year old daughter, grips the small southern town of Vienna. The only hint of their whereabouts hides itself in the mind of the mayor's preteen son, who believes a seemingly senile old woman is his baby sister. The young man is afraid to tell his parents what he believes, but desperately shares his incredible theory with renowned college professor, Carlton Wyatt. Dr. Wyatt's rare openmindedness leads him to a truth that is as ungodly as it is unbelievable.


Author : Barbara Joan DeVinney
Publisher :
Release : 1998
Page : 476
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Benjamin Roth
Publisher : PublicAffairs
Release : 2009-07-22
Page : 288
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1586488376
Description :


When the stock market crashed in 1929, Benjamin Roth was a young lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio. After he began to grasp the magnitude of what had happened to American economic life, he decided to set down his impressions in his diary. This collection of those entries reveals another side of the Great Depression—one lived through by ordinary, middle-class Americans, who on a daily basis grappled with a swiftly changing economy coupled with anxiety about the unknown future. Roth's depiction of life in time of widespread foreclosures, a schizophrenic stock market, political unrest and mass unemployment seem to speak directly to readers today.


Author : David S. Brown
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2020-11-24
Page : 464
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 1982128259
Description :


A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice A revelatory biography of literary icon Henry Adams—one of America’s most prominent writers and intellectuals of his era, who witnessed and contributed to the United States’ dramatic transition from a colonial society to a modern nation. Henry Adams is perhaps the most eclectic, accomplished, and important American writer of his time. His autobiography and modern classic The Education of Henry Adams was widely considered one of the best English-language nonfiction books of the 20th century. The last member of his distinguished family—after great-grandfather John Adams, and grandfather John Quincy Adams—to gain national attention, he is remembered today as an historian, a political commentator, and a memoirist. Now, historian David Brown sheds light on the brilliant yet under-celebrated life of this major American intellectual. Adams not only lived through the Civil War and the Industrial Revolution but he met Abraham Lincoln, bowed before Queen Victoria, and counted powerful figures, including Secretary of State John Hay, Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, and President Theodore Roosevelt as friends and neighbors. His observations of these men and their policies in his private letters provide a penetrating assessment of Gilded Age America on the cusp of the modern era. The Last American Aristocrat details Adams’s relationships with his wife (Marian “Clover” Hooper) and, following her suicide, Elizabeth Cameron, the young wife of a senator and part of the famous Sherman clan from Ohio. Henry Adams’s letters—thousands of them—demonstrate his struggles with depression, familial expectations, and reconciling with his unwanted widower’s existence. Presenting intimate and insightful details of a fascinating and unusual American life and a new window on nineteenth century US history, The Last American Aristocrat shows us a more “modern” and “human” Henry Adams than ever before.


Author : Andrew Steele
Publisher : Doubleday
Release : 2021-03-23
Page : 352
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 0385544936
Description :


“A fascinating look at how scientists are working to help doctors treat not just one disease at a time, but the aging process itself.” —Dr. Sanjay Gupta A startling chronicle by a brilliant young scientist takes us onto the frontiers of the science of aging, and reveals how close we are to an astonishing extension of our life spans and a vastly improved quality of life in our later years. Aging--not cancer, not heart disease--is the true underlying cause of most human death and suffering. We accept as inevitable that as we advance in years our bodies and minds begin to deteriorate and that we are ever more likely to be felled by dementia or disease. But we never really ask--is aging necessary? Biologists, on the other hand, have been investigating that question for years. After all, there are tortoises and salamanders whose risk of dying is the same no matter how old they are. With the help of science, could humans find a way to become old without getting frail, a phenomenon known as "biological immortality"? In Ageless, Andrew Steele, a computational biologist and science writer, takes us on a journey through the laboratories where scientists are studying every bodily system that declines with age--DNA, mitochondria, stem cells, our immune systems--and developing therapies to reverse the trend. With bell-clear writing and intellectual passion, Steele shines a spotlight on a little-known revolution already underway.


Author : James W. Clement
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2021-04-27
Page : 320
Category : Health & Fitness
ISBN 13 : 1982115408
Description :


"How can you lose dramatic weight, reverse chronic conditions, and stay healthier longer? Flip the switch on your metabolism with intermittent fasting, protein restriction, and ketosis! Lose weight. Reverse Chronic Conditions. Live Healthier Longer. Within each of us is an ancient mechanism that eliminates toxic materials, initiates fat burning, and protects cells against stress. It's called autophagy, and when it's turned on, the complex operation can not only slow down the aging process, but can optimize biological function as a whole, helping to stave off all manner of disease-from diabetes to dementia-and affording us the healthy lifespan we never thought possible. So how can we activate this switch through diet? How frequently should we fast and for how long? Must we abstain from all foods or just specific macronutrients? What's the sweet spot between intermittent fasting, protein restriction, and ketogenic eating? Backed by a wealth of data, and with a practical program anyone can follow for lasting results, The Switch not only decodes the science of autophagy, but also teaches you how to control it and benefit from its profound impact"--


Author : Robert Pogue Harrison
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2010-04-15
Page : 224
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 9780226317922
Description :


How do the living maintain relations to the dead? Why do we bury people when they die? And what is at stake when we do? In The Dominion of the Dead, Robert Pogue Harrison considers the supreme importance of these questions to Western civilization, exploring the many places where the dead cohabit the world of the living—the graves, images, literature, architecture, and monuments that house the dead in their afterlife among us. This elegantly conceived work devotes particular attention to the practice of burial. Harrison contends that we bury our dead to humanize the lands where we build our present and imagine our future. As long as the dead are interred in graves and tombs, they never truly depart from this world, but remain, if only symbolically, among the living. Spanning a broad range of examples, from the graves of our first human ancestors to the empty tomb of the Gospels to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Harrison also considers the authority of predecessors in both modern and premodern societies. Through inspired readings of major writers and thinkers such as Vico, Virgil, Dante, Pater, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Rilke, he argues that the buried dead form an essential foundation where future generations can retrieve their past, while burial grounds provide an important bedrock where past generations can preserve their legacy for the unborn. The Dominion of the Dead is a profound meditation on how the thought of death shapes the communion of the living. A work of enormous scope, intellect, and imagination, this book will speak to all who have suffered grief and loss.


Author : Robert Pogue Harrison
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2009-05-08
Page : 304
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 9780226318059
Description :


In this wide-ranging exploration of the role of forests in Western thought, Robert Pogue Harrison enriches our understanding not only of the forest's place in the cultural imagination of the West, but also of the ecological dilemmas that now confront us so urgently. Consistently insightful and beautifully written, this work is especially compelling at a time when the forest, as a source of wonder, respect, and meaning, disappears daily from the earth. "Forests is one of the most remarkable essays on the human place in nature I have ever read, and belongs on the small shelf that includes Raymond Williams' masterpiece, The Country and the City. Elegantly conceived, beautifully written, and powerfully argued, [Forests] is a model of scholarship at its passionate best. No one who cares about cultural history, about the human place in nature, or about the future of our earthly home, should miss it.—William Cronon, Yale Review "Forests is, among other things, a work of scholarship, and one of immense value . . . one that we have needed. It can be read and reread, added to and commented on for some time to come."—John Haines, The New York Times Book Review


Author : Robert G. Bednarik
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release : 2011-06-28
Page : 207
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 9781441993533
Description :


This book summarizes the work of several decades, culminating in a revolutionary model of recent human evolution. It challenges current consensus views fundamentally, presenting in its support a mass of evidence, much of which has never been assembled before. This evidence derives primarily from archaeology, paleoanthropology, genetics, clinical psychology, neurosciences, linguistics and cognitive sciences. No even remotely similar thesis of recent human origins has ever been published, but some of the key elements of this book have been published by the author in major refereed journals in the last two years. Its implications are far-reaching and profoundly affect the way we perceive ourselves as a species. This book about what it means to be human is heavily referenced, with a bibliography of many hundreds of scientific entries.


Author : Robert Pogue Harrison
Publisher : ReadHowYouWant.com
Release : 2010-10
Page : 426
Category : Gardening
ISBN 13 : 1459606264
Description :


Humans have long turned to gardens - both real and imaginary - for sanctuary from the frenzy and tumult that surrounds them. Those gardens may be as far away from everyday reality as Gilgamesh's garden of the gods or as near as our own backyard, but in their very conception and the marks they bear of human care and cultivation, gardens stand as restorative, nourishing, necessary havens.With Gardens, Robert Pogue Harrison graces readers with a thoughtful, wide-ranging examination of the many ways gardens evoke the human condition. Moving from from the gardens of ancient philosophers to the gardens of homeless people in contemporary New York, he shows how, again and again, the garden has served as a check against the destruction and losses of history. The ancients, explains Harrison, viewed gardens as both a model and a location for the laborious self-cultivation and self-improvement that are essential to serenity and enlightenment, an association that has continued throughout the ages. The Bible and Qur'an; Plato's Academy and Epicurus's Garden School; Zen rock and Islamic carpet gardens; Boccaccio, Rihaku, Capek, Cao Xueqin, Italo Calvino, Ariosto, Michel Tournier, and Hannah Arendt - all come into play as this work explores the ways in which the concept and reality of the garden has informed human thinking about mortality, order, and power. Alive with the echoes and arguments of Western thought, Gardens is a fitting continuation of the intellectual journeys of Harrison's earlier classics, Forests and The Dominion of the Dead. Voltaire famously urged us to cultivate our gardens; with this compelling volume, Robert Pogue Harrison reminds us of the nature of that responsibility - and its enduring importance to humanity.


Author : Aubrey de Grey
Michael Rae
Publisher : St. Martin's Press
Release : 2007-09-04
Page : 400
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 9781429931830
Description :


MUST WE AGE? A long life in a healthy, vigorous, youthful body has always been one of humanity's greatest dreams. Recent progress in genetic manipulations and calorie-restricted diets in laboratory animals hold forth the promise that someday science will enable us to exert total control over our own biological aging. Nearly all scientists who study the biology of aging agree that we will someday be able to substantially slow down the aging process, extending our productive, youthful lives. Dr. Aubrey de Grey is perhaps the most bullish of all such researchers. As has been reported in media outlets ranging from 60 Minutes to The New York Times, Dr. de Grey believes that the key biomedical technology required to eliminate aging-derived debilitation and death entirely—technology that would not only slow but periodically reverse age-related physiological decay, leaving us biologically young into an indefinite future—is now within reach. In Ending Aging, Dr. de Grey and his research assistant Michael Rae describe the details of this biotechnology. They explain that the aging of the human body, just like the aging of man-made machines, results from an accumulation of various types of damage. As with man-made machines, this damage can periodically be repaired, leading to indefinite extension of the machine's fully functional lifetime, just as is routinely done with classic cars. We already know what types of damage accumulate in the human body, and we are moving rapidly toward the comprehensive development of technologies to remove that damage. By demystifying aging and its postponement for the nonspecialist reader, de Grey and Rae systematically dismantle the fatalist presumption that aging will forever defeat the efforts of medical science.


Author : Bryce Courtenay
Publisher : ReadHowYouWant.com
Release : 2011-05-20
Page : 544
Category :
ISBN 13 : 1459620801
Description :


Half-African, half-Indian and beautiful, Tandia is just a teenager when she is brutally attacked and violated by the South African police. Desperately afraid and consumed by hatred for the white man, Tandia seeks refuge in a brothel deep in the veld. There she learns to use her brilliant mind and extraordinary looks as weapons for the battles that lie ahead: she trains as a terrorist. But then Tandia meets a man with a past as strange as her own: Peekay, an Oxford undergraduate who is also the challenger for the world welterweight boxing championship - and a white man. And in a land where mixed relationships are outlawed, their growing love can only have the most explosive consequences.


Author : Juan Vidal
Publisher : Atria Books
Release : 2020-03-17
Page : 256
Category : Music
ISBN 13 : 1501169408
Description :


This timely reflection on male identity in America that explores the intersection of fatherhood, race, and hip-hop culture “is a page-turner…drenched in history and encompasses the energy, fire, and passion that is hip-hop” (D. Watkins, New York Times bestselling author). Just as his music career was taking off, Juan Vidal received life-changing news: he’d soon be a father. Throughout his life, neglectful men were the norm—his own dad struggled with drug addiction and infidelity—a cycle that, inevitably, wrought Vidal with insecurity. At age twenty-six, with barely a grip on life, what lessons could he possibly offer a kid? Determined to alter the course for his child, Vidal did what he’d always done when confronted with life’s challenges—he turned to the counterculture. In Rap Dad, the musician-turned-journalist takes a thoughtful and inventive approach to exploring identity and examining how today’s society views fatherhood. To root out the source of his fears around parenting, Vidal revisits the flash points of his juvenescence, a feat that transports him, a first-generation American born to Colombian parents, back to the drug-fueled streets of 1980s–90s Miami. It’s during those pivotal years that he’s drawn to skateboarding, graffiti, and the music of rebellion: hip-hop. As he looks to the past for answers, he infuses his personal story with rap lyrics and interviews with some of pop culture’s most compelling voices—plenty of whom have proven to be some of society’s best, albeit nontraditional, dads. Along the way, Vidal confronts the unfair stereotypes that taint urban men—especially Black and Latino men. “A heartfelt examination of the damage that wayward fathers can leave in their wake” (The Washington Post), Rap Dad is “rich with symbolism…a poetic chronicle of beats, rhymes, and life” (NPR).


Author : Mark Greif
Publisher : Vintage
Release : 2017-08-08
Page : 320
Category : Literary Collections
ISBN 13 : 1101971746
Description :


Over the past eleven years, Greif has been publishing superb, and in some cases already famous, essays in n+1, the high-profile little magazine that he co-founded. These essays address such key topics in the cultural, political, and intellectual life of our time as the tyranny of exercise, the tyranny of nutrition and food snobbery, the sexualization of childhood (and everything else), the philosophical meaning of Radiohead, the rise and fall of the hipster, the impact of the Occupy Wall Street movement, and the crisis of policing. Four of the selections address, directly and unironically, the meaning of life--what might be the right philosophical stance to adopt toward one's self and the world. Each essay in Against Everything is learned, original, highly entertaining, and, from start to finish, dead serious. They are the work of a young intellectual who, with his peers, is reinventing and reinvigorating what intellectuals can be and say and do. Mark Greif manages to reincarnate and revivify the thought and spirit of the greatest of American dissenters, Henry David Thoreau, for our time and historical situation.--Publisher website.


Author : Sue Armstrong
Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
Release : 2019-01-24
Page : 288
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 1472936078
Description :


As featured on BBC Radio 4's Start the Week 'A rich, timely study for the era of "global ageing"' Nature The ageing of the world population is one of the most important issues facing humanity in the 21st century – up there with climate change in its potential global impact. Sometime before 2020, the number of people over 65 worldwide will, for the first time, be greater than the number of 0–4 year olds, and it will keep on rising. The strains this is causing on society are already evident as health and social services everywhere struggle to cope with the care needs of the elderly. But why and how do we age? Scientists have been asking this question for centuries, yet there is still no agreement. There are a myriad competing theories, from the idea that our bodies simply wear out with the rough and tumble of living, like well-worn shoes or a rusting car, to the belief that ageing and death are genetically programmed and controlled. In Borrowed Time, Sue Armstrong tells the story of science's quest to understand ageing and to prevent or delay the crippling conditions so often associated with old age. She focusses inward – on what is going on in our bodies at the most basic level of the cells and genes as the years pass – to look for answers to why and how our skin wrinkles with age, our wounds take much longer to heal than they did when we were kids, and why words escape us at crucial moments in conversation.This book explores these questions and many others through interviews with key scientists in the field of gerontology and with people who have interesting and important stories to tell about their personal experiences of ageing.


Author : Marga Vicedo
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release : 2013-05-16
Page : 331
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 022602055X
Description :


The notion that maternal care and love will determine a child’s emotional well-being and future personality has become ubiquitous. In countless stories and movies we find that the problems of the protagonists—anything from the fear of romantic commitment to serial killing—stem from their troubled relationships with their mothers during childhood. How did we come to hold these views about the determinant power of mother love over an individual’s emotional development? And what does this vision of mother love entail for children and mothers? In The Nature and Nurture of Love, Marga Vicedo examines scientific views about children’s emotional needs and mother love from World War II until the 1970s, paying particular attention to John Bowlby’s ethological theory of attachment behavior. Vicedo tracks the development of Bowlby’s work as well as the interdisciplinary research that he used to support his theory, including Konrad Lorenz’s studies of imprinting in geese, Harry Harlow’s experiments with monkeys, and Mary Ainsworth’s observations of children and mothers in Uganda and the United States. Vicedo’s historical analysis reveals that important psychoanalysts and animal researchers opposed the project of turning emotions into biological instincts. Despite those criticisms, she argues that attachment theory was paramount in turning mother love into a biological need. This shift introduced a new justification for the prescriptive role of biology in human affairs and had profound—and negative—consequences for mothers and for the valuation of mother love.