Living Letters Of The Law Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Jeremy Cohen
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 1999-11-11
Page : 451
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780520218703
Description :


"Well, clearly, and articulately written, Living Letters of the Law is among the most important books in medieval European history generally, as well as in its particular field."—Edward Peters, author of The First Crusade


Author : Hartley Lachter
Publisher : Rutgers University Press
Release : 2014-11-01
Page : 260
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 0813568765
Description :


The set of Jewish mystical teachings known as Kabbalah are often imagined as timeless texts, teachings that have been passed down through the millennia. Yet, as this groundbreaking new study shows, Kabbalah flourished in a specific time and place, emerging in response to the social prejudices that Jews faced. Hartley Lachter, a scholar of religion studies, transports us to medieval Spain, a place where anti-Semitic propaganda was on the rise and Jewish political power was on the wane. Kabbalistic Revolution proposes that, given this context, Kabbalah must be understood as a radically empowering political discourse. While the era’s Christian preachers claimed that Jews were blind to the true meaning of scripture and had been abandoned by God, the Kabbalists countered with a doctrine that granted Jews a uniquely privileged relationship with God. Lachter demonstrates how Kabbalah envisioned this increasingly marginalized group at the center of the universe, their mystical practices serving to maintain the harmony of the divine world. For students of Jewish mysticism, Kabbalistic Revolution provides a new approach to the development of medieval Kabbalah. Yet the book’s central questions should appeal to anyone with an interest in the relationships between religious discourses, political struggles, and ethnic pride.


Author : Adrienne Williams Boyarin
Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
Release : 2020-11-27
Page : 352
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 0812252594
Description :


In the Plea Rolls of the Exchequer of the Jews, Trinity Term 1277, Adrienne Williams Boyarin finds the case of one Sampson son of Samuel, a Jew of Northampton, arrested for impersonating a Franciscan friar and preaching false Christianity. He was sentenced to walk for three days through the centers of London, Canterbury, Oxford, Lincoln, and Northampton carrying the entrails and flayed skin of a calf and exposing his naked, circumcised body to onlookers. Sampson's crime and sentence, Williams Boyarin argues, suggest that he made a convincing friar—when clothed. Indeed, many English texts of this era struggle with the similarities of Jews and Christians, but especially of Jewish and Christian women. Unlike men, Jewish women did not typically wear specific identifying clothing, nor were they represented as physiognomically distinct. Williams Boyarin observes that both before and after the periods in which art historians note a consistent visual repertoire of villainy and difference around Jewish men, English authors highlight and exploit Jewish women's indistinguishability from Christians. Exploring what she calls a "polemics of sameness," she elucidates an essential part of the rhetoric employed by medieval anti-Jewish materials, which could assimilate the Jew into the Christian and, as a consequence, render the Jewess a dangerous but unseeable enemy or a sign of the always-convertible self. The Christian Jew and the Unmarked Jewess considers realities and fantasies of indistinguishability. It focuses on how medieval Christians could identify with Jews and even think of themselves as Jewish—positively or negatively, historically or figurally. Williams Boyarin identifies and explores polemics of sameness through a broad range of theological, historical, and literary works from medieval England before turning more specifically to stereotypes of Jewish women and the ways in which rhetorical strategies that blur the line between "saming" and "othering" reveal gendered habits of representation.


Author : Rebecca Maloy
Publisher : Oxford University Press, USA
Release : 2020
Page : 346
Category : Music
ISBN 13 : 0190071532
Description :


"Songs of Sacrifice argues that liturgical music-both texts and melodies-played a central role in the cultural renewal of early Medieval Iberia. Between the seventh and eleventh centuries, Christian worship on the Iberian Peninsula was structured by rituals of great theological and musical richness, known as the Old Hispanic (or Mozarabic) rite. Much of this liturgy was produced during the seventh century, as part of a cultural and educational program led Isidore of Seville and other bishops. After the conversion of the Visigothic rulers from Arian to Nicene Christianity at the end of the sixth century, the bishops aimed to create a society unified in the Nicene faith, built on twin pillars of church and kingdom. They initiated a project of clerical education, facilitated through a distinctive culture of textual production. The chant repertory was carefully designed to promote these aims. The creators of the chant texts reworked scripture in ways designed to teach biblical exegesis, linking both to the theological works of Isidore and others, and to Visigothic anti-Jewish discourse. The notation reveals an intricate melodic grammar that is closely tied to textual syntax and sound. Through musical rhetoric, the melodies shaped the delivery of the texts to underline words and phrases images of particular liturgical or doctrinal import. The chants thus worked toward the formation of individual Christian souls and a communal, Nicene identity. The final chapters turn to questions about the intersection between orality and writing and the relationships of the Old Hispanic chant to other Western plainsong traditions"--


Author : Donald M. Lewis
Publisher : InterVarsity Press
Release : 2021-08-31
Page : 376
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0830846980
Description :


Christian Zionism influences global politics, especially U.S. foreign policy, and has deeply affected Jewish–Christian and Muslim–Christian relations. With a fair-minded, longitudinal study of this dynamic yet controversial movement, Donald M. Lewis traces its lineage from biblical sources through the Reformation to various movements of today.


Author : Eugene B. Korn
John Pawlikowski
Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
Release : 2005
Page : 172
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 9780742532281
Description :


In the twenty-first century, Jews and Christians are challenged to reconsider their theological assumptions by two inescapable truths: the moral tragedy of the holocaust demands that Christian thinkers acknowledge the violent effects of theologically delegitimizing Jews and Judaism, and the pervasive reality of cultural and religious pluralism calls both Christian and Jewish theologians to rethink the covenant in the presence of the Other. Two Faiths, One Covenant? Jewish and Christian Identity in the Presence of the Other is a breakthrough work that embraces this contemporary challenge and charts a path toward fruitful interfaith dialogue. The Christian and Jewish theologians in this book explore the ways that both religions have understood the covenant and reflect on how it can serve as a reservoir for a positive theological relationship between Christianity and Judaism-not merely one of non-belligerent tolerance, but of respect and theological pluralism, however limited.


Author : Jonathan Elukin
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2013-12-08
Page : 208
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0691162069
Description :


This book challenges the standard conception of the Middle Ages as a time of persecution for Jews. Jonathan Elukin traces the experience of Jews in Europe from late antiquity through the Renaissance and Reformation, revealing how the pluralism of medieval society allowed Jews to feel part of their local communities despite recurrent expressions of hatred against them. Elukin shows that Jews and Christians coexisted more or less peacefully for much of the Middle Ages, and that the violence directed at Jews was largely isolated and did not undermine their participation in the daily rhythms of European society. The extraordinary picture that emerges is one of Jews living comfortably among their Christian neighbors, working with Christians, and occasionally cultivating lasting friendships even as Christian culture often demonized Jews. As Elukin makes clear, the expulsions of Jews from England, France, Spain, and elsewhere were not the inevitable culmination of persecution, but arose from the religious and political expediencies of particular rulers. He demonstrates that the history of successful Jewish-Christian interaction in the Middle Ages in fact laid the social foundations that gave rise to the Jewish communities of modern Europe. Elukin compels us to rethink our assumptions about this fascinating period in history, offering us a new lens through which to appreciate the rich complexities of the Jewish experience in medieval Christendom.


Author : Ineke van 't Spijker
Publisher : BRILL
Release : 2008-12-17
Page : 352
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9047425162
Description :


The articles in this volume explore early-Christian and medieval biblical exegesis as the site of discourse on theological, philosophical and political issues and of the hermeneutics investigating the relation between the surface and the deeper meaning of the text.


Author : Eva Frojmovic
Publisher : BRILL
Release : 2002-01-01
Page : 242
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9789004125650
Description :


This collection of essays re-examines the dynamics of Jewish indentity and Jewish-Christian relations in the Middle Ages and Early Modern period, from the perspective of visual culture, especially manuscript illustration.


Author : Kristine T. Utterback
Merrall L. Price
Publisher : BRILL
Release : 2013-08-22
Page : 356
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9004250441
Description :


In Jews in Medieval Christendom: Slay Them Not, a diverse group of international scholars from various disciplines considers Jewish/Christian relations in medieval Europe, based on St. Augustine’s interpretation of Psalm 51:11: “Slay them not, lest my people forget”.


Author : Samantha Zacher
Publisher : University of Toronto Press
Release : 2016-08-04
Page : 376
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1442666293
Description :


Most studies of Jews in medieval England begin with the year 1066, when Jews first arrived on English soil. Yet the absence of Jews in England before the conquest did not prevent early English authors from writing obsessively about them. Using material from the writings of the Church Fathers, contemporary continental sources, widespread cultural stereotypes, and their own imaginations, their depictions of Jews reflected their own politico-theological experiences. The thirteen essays in Imagining the Jew in Anglo-Saxon Literature and Culture examine visual and textual representations of Jews, the translation and interpretation of Scripture, the use of Hebrew words and etymologies, and the treatment of Jewish spaces and landmarks. By studying the “imaginary Jews” of Anglo-Saxon England, they offer new perspectives on the treatment of race, religion, and ethnicity in pre- and post-conquest literature and culture.


Author : Brian Brown
John Doody
Publisher : Lexington Books
Release : 2008
Page : 308
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780739125809
Description :


Augustine and World Religions examines Augustine's thought for how it can inform modern inter-religious dialogue. Despite Augustine's reputation as the father of Christian intolerance, one finds in his thought the surprising claim that within non-Christian writings there are 'some truths in regard even to the worship of the One God'. This, it seems, hints at a deeper level of respect and dialogue between religions, because one engages in such dialogue in order to better understand and worship God. The essays here uncover provocative points of comparison and similarity between Christianity and other religions to further such an Augustinian dialogue.


Author : Eric Lawee
Publisher : SUNY Press
Release : 2001-09-27
Page : 320
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 9780791451250
Description :


Explores the thought of Isaac Abarbanel, courtier-financier and important Jewish thinker at the turn of the sixteenth century, from the perspective of his negotiation with Jewish tradition.


Author : D. Joslyn-Siemiatkoski
Publisher : Springer
Release : 2009-08-17
Page : 251
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 0230100139
Description :


This book examines texts and materials, ranging from the eastern Mediterranean to northwestern Europe, related to the Maccabean martyrs. Joslyn-Siemiatkoski demonstrates that Christian thinkers constructed memories of the Maccabean martyrs that simultaneously appropriated Jewish traditions and obscured the Jewish origins of Christianity.


Author : Mosheh Tsuḳerman
Publisher : Wallstein Verlag
Release : 2002
Page : 485
Category : Ethnicity
ISBN 13 : 9783892445203
Description :



Author : Thomas Brown
Publisher :
Release : 1703
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 :
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Author : William Law
Publisher :
Release : 1897
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 :
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Author : Thomas Gwynne
Publisher :
Release : 1841
Page : 262
Category : Decedents' estates
ISBN 13 :
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Author : Hugh Bryan
Publisher :
Release : 1760
Page : 171
Category : Christian life
ISBN 13 :
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Author :
Publisher :
Release : 2000
Page :
Category : Jews
ISBN 13 :
Description :