Lost City Of The Incas Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Hiram Bingham
Publisher : Phoenix
Release : 2003-04-03
Page : 224
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 9781842125854
Description :


First published in the 1950s, this is a classic account of the discovery in 1911 of the lost city of Machu Picchu. In 1911 Hiram Bingham, a pre-historian with a love of exotic destinations, set out to Peru in search of the legendary city of Vilcabamba, capital city of the last Inca ruler, Manco Inca. With a combination of doggedness and good fortune he stumbled on the perfectly preserved ruins of Machu Picchu perched on a cloud-capped ledge 2000 feet above the torrent of the Urubamba River. The buildings were of white granite, exquisitely carved blocks each higher than a man. Bingham had not, as it turned out, found Vilcabamba, but he had nevertheless made an astonishing and memorable discovery, which he describes in his bestselling book LOST CITY OF THE INCAS.


Author : Hiram Bingham
Publisher : Praeger
Release : 1981
Page : 263
Category : History
ISBN 13 :
Description :


Hiram Bingham describes the Peruvian expedition to the Inca capitals of Vitcos and Vilcapampa, lost for three centuries under the shadow of Machu Picchu mountain. Here is all that is known about Machu Picchu, its origin, how it came to be lost, and how it was finally discovered.


Author : Suzanne Garbe
Publisher : Capstone
Release : 2015-12-21
Page : 32
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 1515730352
Description :


Soar into the mountains of Peru to discover the archeological wonder of the abandoned city of Machu Picchu. Why did the Incas leave the site? And what was it used for? Travel along with scientists to find out how their discoveries shed light on the mysteries surrounding the Lost City of the Incas. Unlocking the secrets of the past is just an artifact away!


Author : Carole Marsh
Publisher : Gallopade International
Release : 2016-08
Page : 134
Category : Juvenile Fiction
ISBN 13 : 9780635124395
Description :


Christina and Grant get the chance of a lifetime to visit Peru and the incredible Incan ruins at Machu Picchu. "How did they build these amazing place?" Christina Wonders. Along the way, they meet two Peruvian kids looking for their lost llama, and soon they step into a mystery filled with a terrifying train ride, baffling artifacts, a scary Inca king, and even some splattering, smelly llama spit! Will the find out (or what) is scaring tourists away from the majestic mountain city of Machu Picchu: Read and find out.


Author : Ted Lewin
Publisher : Penguin
Release : 2003-06-02
Page : 48
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 1101652772
Description :


Caldecott Honor-winner Ted Lewin takes readers on a thrilling journey to the wilds of Peru in this story of Hiram Bingham, who, in 1911, carved a treacherous path through snake-filled jungles and across perilous mountains in search of Vilcapampa, the lost city of the Incas. Guided the last steps by a young Quechua boy, however, he discovered not the rumored lost city, but the ruins of Machu Picchu, a city totally unknown to the outside world, and one of the wonders of the world.


Author : Mark Adams
Publisher : Penguin
Release : 2011-06-30
Page : 352
Category : Travel
ISBN 13 : 1101535407
Description :


THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING TRAVEL MEMOIR What happens when an unadventurous adventure writer tries to re-create the original expedition to Machu Picchu? In 1911, Hiram Bingham III climbed into the Andes Mountains of Peru and “discovered” Machu Picchu. While history has recast Bingham as a villain who stole both priceless artifacts and credit for finding the great archeological site, Mark Adams set out to retrace the explorer’s perilous path in search of the truth—except he’d written about adventure far more than he’d actually lived it. In fact, he’d never even slept in a tent. Turn Right at Machu Picchu is Adams’ fascinating and funny account of his journey through some of the world’s most majestic, historic, and remote landscapes guided only by a hard-as-nails Australian survivalist and one nagging question: Just what was Machu Picchu?


Author : Christy Zatkin
Publisher :
Release : 2016
Page :
Category : Machu Picchu Site (Peru)
ISBN 13 : 9781683297123
Description :


No one knows for sure whether Machu Picchu was a royal residence, a province capital for farming, or a sacred city.


Author : Hugh Thomson
Publisher : Abrams
Release : 2003-12-30
Page : 316
Category : Photography
ISBN 13 : 1468302302
Description :


With the backdrop of the ever-intriguing Andes mountains, The White Rock, Hugh Thomson’s intoxicating history of the Inca people and their heartland, is a thrilling mix of information and adventure. The author, an acclaimed documentary filmmaker and explorer, expertly weaves accounts of his own discoveries and brushes with danger with the history of those who preceded him—including the explorer Hiram Bingham, who discovered Machu Picchu; the twentieth century South American photographer, Martín Chambi; the poet Pablo Neruda; and the Spanish conquistadores who destroyed the Inca civilization—and the eccentric characters he meets on his travels.


Author : Jesse Harasta
Charles River Editors
Publisher : CreateSpace
Release : 2013-09-02
Page : 40
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9781492312468
Description :


*Includes pictures of Machu Picchu and other important people and places. *Explains the history of the site and the theories about its purpose and abandonment. *Describes the layout of Machu Picchu, its important structures, and the theories about the buildings' uses. In 1911, American historian Hiram Bingham publicized the finding of what at the time was considered a “lost city” of the Inca. Though local inhabitants had known about it for century, Bingham documented and photographed the ruins of a 15th century settlement nestled along a mountain ridge above the Urubamba Valley in Peru, placed so perfectly from a defensive standpoint that it's believed the Spanish never conquered it and may have never known about it. Today, of course, Machu Picchu is one of South America's best tourist spots, and the ruins have even been voted one of the Seven New Wonders of the World. But even though Machu Picchu is now the best known of all Incan ruins, its function in Incan civilization is still not clear. Some have speculated that it was an outpost or a frontier citadel, while others believe it to be a sanctuary or a work center for women. Still others suggest that it was a ceremonial center or perhaps even the last refuge of the Incas after the Spanish conquest. One of the most theories to take hold is that Machu Picchu was the summer dwelling of the Inca's royal court, the Inca's version of Versailles. As was the case with the renaming of Mayan and Aztec ruins, the names given to various structures by archaeologists are purely imaginary and thus not very helpful; for example, the mausoleum, palace or watchtower at Machu Picchu may have been nothing of the sort. What is clear at Machu Picchu is that the urban plan and the building techniques employed followed those at other Incan settlements, particularly the capital of Cuzco. The location of plazas and the clever use of the irregularities of the land, along with the highly developed aesthetic involved in masonry work, followed the model of the Inca capital. At Machu Picchu, the typical Incan technique of meticulously assembling ashlar masonry and creating walls of blocks without a binding material is astounding. The blocks are sometimes evenly squared and sometimes are of varying shape. In the latter case, the very tight connection between the blocks of stone seems quite remarkable. Even more astounding than the precise stone cutting of the Incas is the method that they used for the transportation and movement on site of these enormous blocks. The Incas did not have the wheel, so all the work was accomplished using rollers and levers. Machu Picchu: The History and Mystery of the Incan City comprehensively covers the history of the city, as well as the speculation surrounding the purpose of Machu Picchu and the debate over the buildings. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about Machu Picchu like you never have before, in no time at all.


Author : David Roberts
Publisher :
Release : 1977
Page : 45
Category : Incas
ISBN 13 :
Description :


Discusses the growth of the Inca Empire and its decline following its discovery and conquest by the Spaniards.


Author : Christopher Heaney
Publisher : St. Martin's Press
Release : 2011-07-05
Page : 304
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 0230339883
Description :


In 1911, a young Peruvian boy led an American explorer and Yale historian named Hiram Bingham into the ancient Incan citadel of Machu Picchu. Hidden amidst the breathtaking heights of the Andes, this settlement of temples, tombs and palaces was the Incas' greatest achievement. Tall, handsome, and sure of his destiny, Bingham believed that Machu Picchu was the Incas' final refuge, where they fled the Spanish Conquistadors. Bingham made Machu Picchu famous, and his dispatches from the jungle cast him as the swashbuckling hero romanticized today as a true Indiana Jones-like character. But his excavation of the site raised old specters of conquest and plunder, and met with an indigenous nationalism that changed the course of Peruvian history. Though Bingham successfully realized his dream of bringing Machu Picchu's treasure of skulls, bones and artifacts back to the United States, conflict between Yale and Peru persists through the present day over a simple question: Who owns Inca history? In this grand, sweeping narrative, Christopher Heaney takes the reader into the heart of Peru's past to relive the dramatic story of the final years of the Incan empire, the exhilarating recovery of their final cities and the thought-provoking fight over their future. Drawing on original research in untapped archives, Heaney vividly portrays both a stunning landscape and the complex history of a fascinating region that continues to inspire awe and controversy today.


Author : History Titans
Publisher : Creek Ridge Publishing
Release : 2021-08-21
Page : 64
Category : Travel
ISBN 13 :
Description :


Considered to be one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in 2019, Machu Picchu is a man-made structure situated in the Andes Mountains in Peru. One of the things that makes it so special is that even though it was built in the 1400s, it was not discovered until the early 1900s, giving it a long-lasting opportunity to keep its form and magnificence when it comes to architecture and engineering. This ancient citadel was built by the incredible Inca civilization many centuries ago.


Author : Mark Rice
Publisher : UNC Press Books
Release : 2018-08-17
Page : 252
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1469643545
Description :


Speaking at a 1913 National Geographic Society gala, Hiram Bingham III, the American explorer celebrated for finding the "lost city" of the Andes two years earlier, suggested that Machu Picchu "is an awful name, but it is well worth remembering." Millions of travelers have since followed Bingham's advice. When Bingham first encountered Machu Picchu, the site was an obscure ruin. Now designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Machu Picchu is the focus of Peru's tourism economy. Mark Rice's history of Machu Picchu in the twentieth century—from its "discovery" to today's travel boom—reveals how Machu Picchu was transformed into both a global travel destination and a powerful symbol of the Peruvian nation. Rice shows how the growth of tourism at Machu Picchu swayed Peruvian leaders to celebrate Andean culture as compatible with their vision of a modernizing nation. Encompassing debates about nationalism, Indigenous peoples' experiences, and cultural policy—as well as development and globalization—the book explores the contradictions and ironies of Machu Picchu's transformation. On a broader level, it calls attention to the importance of tourism in the creation of national identity in Peru and Latin America as a whole.


Author : Kim MacQuarrie
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2008-06-17
Page : 544
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0743260503
Description :


Documents the epic conquest of the Inca Empire as well as the decades-long insurgency waged by the Incas against the Conquistadors, in a narrative history that is partially drawn from the storytelling traditions of the Peruvian Amazon Yora people. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.


Author : Douglas Preston
Publisher : Grand Central Publishing
Release : 2017-01-03
Page : 304
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1455540021
Description :


NAMED A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF 2017#1 New York Times and #1 Wall Street Journal bestseller! A five-hundred-year-old legend. An ancient curse. A stunning medical mystery. And a pioneering journey into the unknown heart of the world's densest jungle. Since the days of conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and they warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die. In 1940, swashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the rainforest with hundreds of artifacts and an electrifying story of having found the Lost City of the Monkey God-but then committed suicide without revealing its location. Three quarters of a century later, bestselling author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists on a groundbreaking new quest. In 2012 he climbed aboard a rickety, single-engine plane carrying the machine that would change everything: lidar, a highly advanced, classified technology that could map the terrain under the densest rainforest canopy. In an unexplored valley ringed by steep mountains, that flight revealed the unmistakable image of a sprawling metropolis, tantalizing evidence of not just an undiscovered city but an enigmatic, lost civilization. Venturing into this raw, treacherous, but breathtakingly beautiful wilderness to confirm the discovery, Preston and the team battled torrential rains, quickmud, disease-carrying insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes. But it wasn't until they returned that tragedy struck: Preston and others found they had contracted in the ruins a horrifying, sometimes lethal-and incurable-disease. Suspenseful and shocking, filled with colorful history, hair-raising adventure, and dramatic twists of fortune, THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD is the absolutely true, eyewitness account of one of the great discoveries of the twenty-first century.


Author : Richard L. Burger
C J MacCurdy Professor and Current Chairman of the Council on Archaeological Studies Richard L Burger
Publisher : Yale University Press
Release : 2004-01-01
Page : 230
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0300097638
Description :


Details the status of contemporary research on Incan civilization, and addresses mysteries of the founding and abandonment of Machu Picchu, charting its archaeological history from 1911 to the present.


Author : Hiram Bingham
Publisher :
Release : 1968
Page : 240
Category : Incas
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : David Grann
Publisher : Vintage
Release : 2009-02-24
Page : 352
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0385529228
Description :


The #1 New York Times bestseller from the author of Killers of the Flower Moon In 1925, the legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett ventured into the Amazon jungle, in search of a fabled civilization. He never returned. Over the years countless perished trying to find evidence of his party and the place he called “The Lost City of Z.” In this masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, journalist David Grann interweaves the spellbinding stories of Fawcett’s quest for “Z” and his own journey into the deadly jungle, as he unravels the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century.


Author : Amy Cox Hall
Publisher : University of Texas Press
Release : 2017-11-22
Page : 288
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1477313680
Description :


When Hiram Bingham, a historian from Yale University, first saw Machu Picchu in 1911, it was a ruin obscured by overgrowth whose terraces were farmed a by few families. A century later, Machu Picchu is a UNESCO world heritage site visited by more than a million tourists annually. This remarkable transformation began with the photographs that accompanied Bingham's article published in National Geographic magazine, which depicted Machu Picchu as a lost city discovered. Focusing on the practices, technologies, and materializations of Bingham's three expeditions to Peru (1911, 1912, 1914–1915), this book makes a convincing case that visualization, particularly through the camera, played a decisive role in positioning Machu Picchu as both a scientific discovery and a Peruvian heritage site. Amy Cox Hall argues that while Bingham's expeditions relied on the labor, knowledge, and support of Peruvian elites, intellectuals, and peasants, the practice of scientific witnessing, and photography specifically, converted Machu Picchu into a cultural artifact fashioned from a distinct way of seeing. Drawing on science and technology studies, she situates letter writing, artifact collecting, and photography as important expeditionary practices that helped shape the way we understand Machu Picchu today. Cox Hall also demonstrates that the photographic evidence was unstable, and, as images circulated worldwide, the "lost city" took on different meanings, especially in Peru, which came to view the site as one of national patrimony in need of protection from expeditions such as Bingham's.


Author : Hiram BINGHAM (Third of the Name.)
Publisher :
Release : 1951
Page : 224
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :