Mark Twain In The Company Of Women Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Laura E. Skandera Trombley
Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
Release : 1997-02
Page : 248
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9780812216196
Description :


Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Book for 1995


Author : Leland Krauth
Publisher : University of Georgia Press
Release : 2003
Page : 307
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780820325408
Description :


In this comparison of Mark Twain with six of his literary contemporaries, Leland Krauth looks anew at the writer's multifaceted creativity. Twain, a highly lettered man immersed in the literary culture of his time, viewed himself as working within a community of writers. He likened himself to a guild member whose work was the crafted product of a common trade--and sometimes made with borrowed materials. Yet there have been few studies of Twain in relation to his fellow guild members. In Mark Twain & Company, Krauth examines some creative "sparks and smolderings" ignited by Twain's contact with certain writers, all of whom were published, read, and criticized on both sides of the Atlantic: the Americans Bret Harte, William Dean Howells, and Harriet Beecher Stowe and the British writers Matthew Arnold, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Rudyard Kipling. Each chapter explores the nature of Twain's personal relationship with a writer as well as the literary themes and modes they shared. Krauth looks at the sentimentality of Harte and Twain and its influence on their protest fiction; the humor and social criticism of Twain and Howells; the use of the Gothic by Twain and Stowe to explore racial issues; the role of Victorian Sage assumed by Arnold and Twain to critique civilization; the exploitation of adventure fiction by Twain and Stevenson to reveal conceptions of masculinity; and the use of the picaresque in Kipling and Twain to support or subvert imperialism. Mark Twain & Company casts new light on some of the most enduring writers in English. At the same time it refreshes the debate over the transatlantic nature of Victorianism with new insights about nineteenth-century morality, conventionality, race, corporeality, imperialism, manhood, and individual identity.


Author : Forrest G. Robinson
Robinson Forrest G.
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 1995-05-26
Page : 258
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780521445931
Description :


Accessible enough to interest new students as well as specialists, these essays examine Twain from a wide variety of critical perspectives. They include timely reflections by major critics on the hotly debated dynamics of race and slavery perceptible throughout his writing.


Author : Harold K. Bush
Publisher : University of Alabama Press
Release : 2007-01-07
Page : 340
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 0817315381
Description :


Mark Twain is often pictured as a severe critic of religious piety, shaking his fist at God and mocking the devout. This book highlights Twain's attractions to and engagements with the variety of religious phenomena of America in his lifetime. It offers a more complicated understanding of Twain and his literary output.


Author : Laura Skandera Trombley
Publisher : Vintage
Release : 2011
Page : 333
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 0307474941
Description :


Reveals the relationship shared between the iconic author and his secretary throughout the last decade of his life, describing how Twain came to depend upon her to manage his household and finances before a dramatic falling out.


Author : Connie Ann Kirk
Publisher : ABC-CLIO
Release : 2004-07-30
Page : 168
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 0313058628
Description :


Samuel Clemens lived 75 years, 50 under the pseudonym Mark Twain. His youth could be characterized as sometimes mischievous, his older years as generally eccentric and his writing as always provocative. Twain left a literary canon of nearly 50 books, hundreds of short stories and essays, and a veritable treasury of quotable epigrams. While his words and his works have stood up to the test of time, knowing the man behind the persona, and understanding what inspired and influenced the writer, is crucial to fully appreciating the contributions Twain made to American literature. By skillfully weaving together strands of history with his personal story, this authoritative biography helps readers come to more fully understand the man and his enduring legacy. Starting with a chapter on Clemens' boyhood, readers are treated to a very personal view of Twain's early life. Twain's adult life is chronicled with five expertly developed chapters that explore his early professional years from printer to pilot, his travels westward and abroad, his gilded years with his beloved wife Livy, and his final years of widowhood and decline. This engaging biography also delves into the enduring impact of Twain's creative voice and his unique blend of humor with social commentary that not only entertained but also challenged thinking and changed the literary landscape forever. This biography draws from the best of established Twain resources and scholarship, and adds fresh new perspectives from personal letters, original manuscripts, and extended study visits to important places including Twain's study and Quarry Farm. This work is written in a lively style that Twain himself would appreciate and students will enjoy. Researchers hoping to dig deeper into the Twain legacy will benefit from the expertly compiled information and documentation of resources offered here. A chronology, a bibliography and five additional fact-filled appendices, including quotes from Twain, books by Twain, and a rendering of his family tree will help readers get a solid handle on the details as well as the big picture of Mark Twain's life and legacy.


Author : Shelley Fisher Fishkin
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2002-10-03
Page : 328
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 0199729069
Description :


Mark Twain (born Samuel Clemens), a former printer's apprentice, journalist, steamboat pilot, and miner, remains to this day one of the most enduring and beloved of America's great writers. Combining cultural criticism with historical scholarship, A Historical Guide to Mark Twain addresses a wide range of topics relevant to Twain's work, including religion, commerce, race, gender, social class, and imperialism. Like all of the Historical Guides to American Authors, this volume includes an introduction, a brief biography, a bibliographic essay, and an illustrated chronology of the author's life and times.


Author : Steven R. Serafin
Alfred Bendixen
Publisher : A&C Black
Release : 2005-09-01
Page : 1305
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780826417770
Description :


More than ten years in the making, this comprehensive single-volume literary survey is for the student, scholar, and general reader. The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature represents a collaborative effort, involving 300 contributors from across the US and Canada. Composed of more than 1,100 signed biographical-critical entries, this Encyclopedia serves as both guide and companion to the study and appreciation of American literature. A special feature is the topical article, of which there are 70.


Author : Everett Emerson
Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
Release : 2017-02-17
Page : 416
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 1512821551
Description :


Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2000 "Mark Twain endures. Readers sense his humanity, enjoy his humor, and appreciate his insights into human nature, even into such painful experiences as embarrassment and humiliation. No matter how remarkable the life of Samuel Clemens was, what matters most is the relationship of Mark Twain the writer and his writings. That is the subject of this book."—from the Preface In Mark Twain, A Literary Life, Everett Emerson revisits one of America's greatest and most popular writers to explore the relationship between the life of the writer and his writings. The assumption throughout is that to see Mark Twain's writings in focus, one must give proper attention to their biographical context. Mark Twain's literary career is fascinating in its strangeness. How could this genius have had so little sense of what he should next do? As a young man, Samuel Clemens's first vocation, that of journeyman printer, took him far from home to the sights of New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, while his next vocation would give him the identity by which we most frequently know him. His choice of "Mark Twain" as a pen name cemented his bond with the river, as did such books as Life on the Mississippi and Huckleberry Finn. Then following an unsuccessful try at silver mining, Clemens worked as a newspaperman, humorist, lecturer, but also cultivated an interest in playwriting, politics, and philosophizing. In reporting the author's life, Emerson has endeavored to permit Mark Twain to tell his own story as much as possible, through the use of letters and autobiographical writings, some unpublished. These fascinating glimpses into the life of the writer will be of interest to all who have an abiding affection for Samuel Clemens and his extraordinary legacy.


Author : Jarrod D. Roark
Publisher : McFarland
Release : 2019-09-19
Page : 232
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1476679738
Description :


This book is a literary exploration of Mark Twain's writings on crime in the American West and its intersection with morality, gender and justice. Writing from his office at the Enterprise newspaper in the Nevada Territory, Twain employed a distinct style of crime writing--one that sensationalized facts and included Twain's personal philosophies and observations. Covering Twain's journalism, fictional works and his own personal letters, this book contextualizes the writer's coverage of crime through his anxieties about westward expansion and the promise of a utopian West. Twain's observations on the West often reflected common perceptions of the day, positioning him as a "voice of the people" on issues like crime, punishment and gender.


Author : Peter Messent
Louis J. Budd
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release : 2015-06-15
Page : 592
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1119117917
Description :


This broad-ranging companion brings together respected American and European critics and a number of up-and-coming scholars to provide an overview of Twain, his background, his writings, and his place in American literary history. One of the most broad-ranging volumes to appear on Mark Twain in recent years Brings together respected Twain critics and a number of younger scholars in the field to provide an overview of this central figure in American literature Places special emphasis on the ways in which Twain's works remain both relevant and important for a twenty-first century audience A concluding essay evaluates the changing landscape of Twain criticism


Author : Martin Naparsteck
Michele Cardulla
Publisher : McFarland
Release : 2013-11-22
Page : 220
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 0786472618
Description :


"Olivia Langdon was born into what became the richest family in Elmira, New York, in 1845, and was one of the first females in the country to attend college. But her life became extraordinary when she married Mark Twain in 1870, however, it was filled with tragedy. Through all of this, they maintained a close, loving, caring relationship"--


Author : John Bird
Publisher : University of Missouri Press
Release : 2007
Page : 268
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN 13 : 0826266029
Description :


Metaphor theory, observes John Bird, is like Mark Twain: both seem simple upon first introduction. Now, in the most complete study to date of Twain's use of figurative language, a veteran Twain scholar tackles the core of his writing and explores it with theoretical approaches that have rarely been applied to Twain, providing new insights into how he imagined his world--and the singular ways in which he expressed himself. From "The Jumping Frog" to the late dream narratives, Bird considers Twain's metaphoric construction over his complete career and especially sheds new light on his central texts: Roughing It; The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court; Pudd'nhead Wilson; and No. 44,The Mysterious Stranger. He reconsiders "Old Times on the Mississippi" as the most purely metaphorical of Twain's writings, goes on to look at how Twain used metaphor and talked about it in a variety of works and genres, and even argues that Clemens's pseudonym is not so much an alter ego as a metaphorized self. By offering insight into how Twain handled figurative language during the composing process, Bird reveals not only hidden facets of his artistry but also new aspects of works that we think we know well--including some entirely new ideas regarding Huck Finn that draw on the recent discovery of the first half of the manuscript. In addition to dealing with issues currently central to Twain studies, such as race and gender, he also links metaphor to humor and dream theory to further illuminate topics central to his work. More than a study of Twain's language, the book delves into the psychological aspects of metaphor to reveal the writer's attitudes and thoughts, showing how using metaphor as a guide to Twain reveals much about his composition process. Applying the insights of metaphor theorists such as Roman Jakobson and Colin M. Turbayne, Bird offers readers not only new insights into Twain but also an introduction to this interdisciplinary field. In lively prose, Mark Twain and Metaphor provides a vital way to read Twain's entire corpus, allowing readers to better appreciate his style, humor, and obsession with dreams. It opens new ground and makes old ground fresh again, offering ways to see and resee this essential American writer.


Author : Susan K. Harris
Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture Susan K Harris
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 1996
Page : 202
Category : Literary Collections
ISBN 13 : 9780521556507
Description :


This biography places the correspondence and diaries of Langdon and Twain within the larger context of Victorian American culture.


Author : Philip McFarland
Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
Release : 2014-01-16
Page : 499
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 1442212276
Description :


Presents a narrative history of the United States from 1890 to 1910, exploring such major themes as nationalism, racism, industrialization, and imperialism as reflected in the actions and writings of the era's two most famous figures.


Author : Louise Barnett
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2006-12-07
Page : 238
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780195345957
Description :


Jonathan Swift was the subject of gossip and criticism in his own time concerning his relations with women and his representations of them in his writings. For over twenty years he regarded Esther Johnson, "Stella," as "his most valuable friend," yet he is reputed never to have seen her alone. From his time to our own there has been speculation that the two were secretly married--since their relationship seemed so inexplicable then and now. For thirteen of the years that Swift seemed committed to Stella as the acknowledged woman in his life, he maintained a clandestine--but apparently also nonsexual--relationship with another woman, Esther Van Homrigh, or "Vanessa." Jonathan Swift in the Company of Women looks again at these much-examined relationships and at others that reveal Swift as a man who enjoyed the company of a number of women as pupils and as ministrants to his various needs. Swift, a man with a complex private life, was also a writer whose satiric portraits of women could be unsparing. While Swift often criticized women for frivolous pastimes and idle chatter, his most notorious texts on women image their bodies as loathsome: as he once wrote in a serious political tract, a woman is a "nauseous, unwholesome carcass." Such representations cross a line by showing a repugnance for women as a sex, the biological other. They have led, not surprisingly, to repeated charges of misogyny, an issue that Jonathan Swift in the Company of Women addresses at some length. This first book-length treatment of Swift and women comprehensively examines Swift's attitude toward women in all their manifestations in his work and life: as intimates, acquaintances, prot?g?s, wives, mothers, nurses, disobedient daughters, young women who marry older men, and--finally--as poets and critics.


Author : Laura E. Skandera Trombley
Michael J. Kiskis
Publisher : University of Missouri Press
Release : 2011-09
Page : 252
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 0826219683
Description :


The thirteen essays in this collection combine to offer a complex and deeply nuanced picture of Samuel Clemens. With the purpose of straying from the usual notions of Clemens (most notably the Clemens/Twain split that has ruled Twain scholarship for over thirty years), the editors have assembled contributions from a wide range of Twain scholars. As a whole, the collection argues that it is time we approach Clemens not as a shadow behind the literary persona but as a complex and intricate creator of stories, a creator who is deeply embedded in the political events of his time and who used a mix of literary, social, and personal experience to fuel the movements of his pen. The essays illuminate Clemens's connections with people and events not usually given the spotlight and introduce us to Clemens as a man deeply embroiled in the process of making literary gold out of everyday experiences. From Clemens's wonderings on race and identity to his looking to family and domesticity as defining experiences, from musings on the language that Clemens used so effectively to consideration of the images and processes of composition, these essays challenge long-held notions of why Clemens was so successful and so influential a writer. While that search itself is not new, the varied approaches within this collection highlight markedly inventive ways of reading the life and work of Samuel Clemens.


Author : Karen Lystra
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 2006-08-09
Page : 342
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9780520250000
Description :


The misunderstood events of the last ten years of Mark Twain's life are liberated in an incisive biography, demonstrating that, while he lived in the shadows of losses, he continued to explore the balance between love and pain with energy and enthusiasm.


Author : R. Kent Rasmussen
Publisher : Infobase Publishing
Release : 2007-01-01
Page : 1159
Category : Authors, American
ISBN 13 : 1438108524
Description :


Presents a two-volume examination of the life and writings of Mark Twain including detailed synopses of his works, explanations of literary terms, biographies of friends and family, and social and historical influences.


Author : Michael B. Snyder
Publisher : Greenwood Publishing Group
Release : 2003
Page : 358
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780313313462
Description :


Looks at gender-related themes in ninety-six of the most frequently taught works of fiction, including "Anna Karenina," "Brave New World," "Great Expectations," and "Lord of the Flies."