Nisei Sansei Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Jere Takahashi
Publisher : Temple University Press
Release : 1998-06
Page : 261
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 9781566396592
Description :


To talk about "political style" is to acknowledge a dynamic and somewhat improvisational approach to politics; it is to acknowledge the need to work within the limits presented by tradition, resources, and social context. To speak of "political style" in relation to a particular ethnic group is to recognize their agency in shaping their history.In Nisei/Sansei: Shifting Japanese American Identities and Politics, Jere Takahashi challenges studies that describe the Japanese American community's essentially linear process toward assimilation into U.S. society. As he develops a complex and nuanced account of Japanese American life, he shows that a diversity of opinion and debate about effective political strategy characterized each generation of Japanese Americans. As he investigates the ways in which each generation attempted to advance its interests and concerns, he uncovers the struggles over key issues and introduces the community activists whose voices have been muffled by assimilation narratives.Takahashi's approach to political style includes the ways that Japanese Americans mustered and managed political resources, but also encompasses their on-going efforts at self-definition. His focus, then, is on personal and social action; on individual activists, power, and ideological shifts within the community, and generational change. In telling the story of the community's complex and dynamic relationship to the larger society, he highlights individuals who contributed to the struggles and debates that paved the way for the emergence of a distinct Japanese American identity. Author note: Jere Takahashi teaches Asian American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.


Author : Gaia Gail Hashimoto
Publisher :
Release : 2012
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9780494923627
Description :



Author :
Publisher :
Release : 1972
Page : 34
Category : Japanese
ISBN 13 :
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Author : Tacoma Community College. Library. Reference Department
Lorraine Hildebrand
Publisher :
Release : 1972
Page : 140
Category : Japan
ISBN 13 :
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Author : Amerasia Resources, inc
Publisher :
Release : 1971
Page : 34
Category : Japanese
ISBN 13 :
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Author : Minako K. Maykovich
Publisher :
Release : 1972
Page : 151
Category : Japanese
ISBN 13 :
Description :


The major theme of this book is the label "Quiet American" for the Japanese American. In order to locate Japanese Americans sociologically and psychologically in the structure of American society, various concepts such as "marginal man, "alienation," and "inauthenticity" are examined, specifying these concepts as they are used in different situations. The chapters in the book deal with the origin of the Japanese immigrant characteristics of diligence, conformity, and self-control in the traditional Japanese value system; show how the Issei (first generation immigrants), with these attributes, overcame adversity and retained their Japanese identity; describe how the Nisei (second generation Japanese immigrants), without protesting against social injustice, quietly accommodated themselves to white society until they secured middle class status; examine the identity crisis experienced by the Sansei (third generation); describe the methodology by which data relating to Sansei college students in California were gathered; discuss the path analysis method applied to empirical data to relate Sansei political radicalization to family background, Nisei-Sansei relations, and Sansei attitudes; and portray the styles of the Sansei revolt.


Author : Tomoko Makabe
Publisher :
Release : 1998
Page : 218
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 :
Description :


With 66,000 members the Japanese-Canadian community is one of the smallest ethnic communities in Canada. Originally concentrated on the West Coast, their population was dispersed following the expulsion and internment of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. In 1988 the redress of injustices to citizens interned during the war marked the end of a long fight that had united Japanese Canadians. The community has sensed a weakening of ties ever since. The Nisei, or second generation of Japanese Canadians who lived through the war, suffered massive discrimination. Scattered across the nation, their children, the Sansei or third generation, have little contact with other Japanese Canadians and have been fully integrated into mainstream society. Tomoko Makabe discovered in her interviews with thirty-six men and twenty-eight women that, in general, the Sansei don't speak Japanese; they marry outside of the Japanese community; and tend to be indifferent to their being Japanese Canadian. Many are upwardly mobile: they live in middle-class neighbourhoods, are well educated, and work as professionals. It's possible to speculate that the community will vanish with the fourth generation. But Makabe has some reservations. Ethnic identity can be sustained in more symbolic ways. With support and interest from the community at large, aspects of the structures, institutions, and identities of an ethnic group can become an integral part of the dominant culture. The Canadian Sansei is much more than an account of third-generation Japanese Canadians. Makabe's explorations reflect on aspects of history, culture, and identity in general as they relate to ethnic minorities in Canada and throughout the world.


Author : Michele Elizabeth Ishikawa
Washington State University. Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling Psychology
Publisher :
Release : 2013
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781303465505
Description :


Each participant was administered an adapted version of the Stephenson Multigroup Acculturation Scale, the Asian Values Scale-Revised, an adapted version of the European American Values Scale for Asian Americans, the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, and the Meaning in Life Questionnaire and asked to complete a demographic information sheet. Data were analyzed using analyses of variance, multivariate analyses of variance, and hierarchical regression analyses.


Author : Westview Presbyterian Church (Watsonville, Calif.)
Michio Ito
Publisher :
Release : 1958
Page : 59
Category : Church buildings
ISBN 13 :
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Author : Seiichi Michael Yasutake
Publisher :
Release : 1980
Page : 780
Category : Japanese Americans
ISBN 13 :
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Author : Yasuko I. Takezawa
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release : 1995
Page : 233
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 9780801481819
Description :


A unique interpretation of how wartime internment and the movement for redress affected Japanese Americans.


Author : Donald Yamasaki
Publisher :
Release : 2013-04-12
Page : 310
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781482361995
Description :


If you're going to read another book, this is the book to read. It is an easy to read book about three generations of camp life at Pu'unene, Maui. You will also meet a special friend of the author, and you will enjoy all of the personal experiences in the book


Author : Karen Tei Yamashita
Publisher : Coffee House Press
Release : 2020-05-05
Page :
Category : Fiction
ISBN 13 : 1566895863
Description :


In these buoyant and inventive stories, Karen Tei Yamashita transfers classic tales across boundaries and questions what an inheritance—familial, cultural, emotional, artistic—really means. In a California of the sixties and seventies, characters examine the contents of deceased relatives' freezers, tape-record high school locker-room chatter, or collect a community's gossip while cleaning the teeth of its inhabitants. Mr. Darcy is the captain of the football team, Mansfield Park materializes in a suburb of L.A., bake sales replace ballroom dances, and station wagons, not horse-drawn carriages, are the preferred mode of transit. The stories of traversing class, race, and gender leap into our modern world with and humor.


Author : Eileen Tamura
Publisher : University of Illinois Press
Release : 1993
Page : 326
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780252063589
Description :


Wartime hysteria over "foreign" ways fueled a movement for Americanization that swept the United States during and after World War I. Eileen H. Tamura examines the forms that hysteria took in Hawai'i, where the Nisei (children of Japanese immigrants) were targets of widespread discrimination. Tamura analyzes Hawaii's organized effort to force the Nisei to adopt "American" ways, discussing it within the larger phenomenon of Nisei acculturation. While racism was prevalent in "paradise," the Nisei and their parents also performed as active agents in their own lives, with the older generation attempting to maintain Japanese cultural ways and the younger wishing to become "true Americans." Caucasian "Americanizers," often associated with powerful agricultural interests, wanted labor to remain cheap and manageable; they lobbied for racist laws and territorial policies, portending the treatment of ethnic Japanese on the U.S. mainland during World War II. Tamura offers a wealth of original source material, using personal accounts as well as statistical data to create an essential resource for students of American ethnic history and U.S. race and class relations.


Author : Susan Matoba Adler
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2019-05-24
Page : 204
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1317732944
Description :


This postmodern feminist study explores changes in Japanese American women's perspectives on child rearing, education, and ethnicity across three generations-Nisei (second), Sansei (third), and Yonsei (fourth). Shifts in socio-political and cultural milieu have influenced the construction of racial and ethnic identities; Nisei women survived internment before relocating to the midwest, Sansei women grew up in white suburban communities, while Yonsei women grew up in a culture increasingly attuned toward multiculturalism. In contrast to the historical focus on Japanese American communities in California and Hawaii, this study explores the transformation of ethnic culture in the midwest. Midwestern Japanese American women found themselves removed from large ethnic communities, and the development of their identities and culture provides valuable insight into the experience of a group of Asian minorities in the heartland. The book explores central issues in studies of Japanese culture, the Japanese sense of self, and the Japanese family, including amae (mother-child dependency relationship), gambare (perseverance), and gaman (endurance).


Author : Jane H. Yamashiro
Publisher : Rutgers University Press
Release : 2017-01-24
Page : 224
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0813576393
Description :


There is a rich body of literature on the experience of Japanese immigrants in the United States, and there are also numerous accounts of the cultural dislocation felt by American expats in Japan. But what happens when Japanese Americans, born and raised in the United States, are the ones living abroad in Japan? Redefining Japaneseness chronicles how Japanese American migrants to Japan navigate and complicate the categories of Japanese and “foreigner.” Drawing from extensive interviews and fieldwork in the Tokyo area, Jane H. Yamashiro tracks the multiple ways these migrants strategically negotiate and interpret their daily interactions. Following a diverse group of subjects—some of only Japanese ancestry and others of mixed heritage, some fluent in Japanese and others struggling with the language, some from Hawaii and others from the US continent—her study reveals wide variations in how Japanese Americans perceive both Japaneseness and Americanness. Making an important contribution to both Asian American studies and scholarship on transnational migration, Redefining Japaneseness critically interrogates the common assumption that people of Japanese ancestry identify as members of a global diaspora. Furthermore, through its close examination of subjects who migrate from one highly-industrialized nation to another, it dramatically expands our picture of the migrant experience.


Author : Takeyuki Tsuda
Publisher : NYU Press
Release : 2016-09-13
Page : 352
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1479810797
Description :


As one of the oldest groups of Asian Americans in the United States, most Japanese Americans are culturally assimilated and well-integrated in mainstream American society. However, they continue to be racialized as culturally “Japanese” foreigners simply because of their Asian appearance in a multicultural America where racial minorities are expected to remain ethnically distinct. Different generations of Japanese Americans have responded to such pressures in ways that range from demands that their racial citizenship as bona fide Americans be recognized to a desire to maintain or recover their ethnic heritage and reconnect with their ancestral homeland. In Japanese American Ethnicity, Takeyuki Tsuda explores the contemporary ethnic experiences of Japanese Americans from the second to the fourth generations and the extent to which they remain connected to their ancestral cultural heritage. He also places Japanese Americans in transnational and diasporic context and analyzes the performance of ethnic heritage through the example of taiko drumming ensembles. Drawing on extensive fieldwork with Japanese Americans in San Diego and Phoenix, Tsuda argues that the ethnicity of immigrant-descent minorities does not simply follow a linear trajectory. Increasing cultural assimilation does not always erode the significance of ethnic heritage and identity over the generations. Instead, each new generation of Japanese Americans has negotiated its own ethnic positionality in different ways. Young Japanese Americans today are reviving their cultural heritage and embracing its salience in their daily lives more than the previous generations. This book demonstrates how culturally assimilated minorities can simultaneously maintain their ancestral cultures or even actively recover their lost ethnic heritage.


Author : Angela Reyes
Adrienne Lo
Publisher : OUP USA
Release : 2009
Page : 401
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN 13 : 0195327357
Description :


This volume examines issues of language, identity, and culture among the rapidly growing Asian Pacific American (APA) population. It cover topics such as media representations of APAs, codeswitching and language crossing, and narratives of ethnic identity.


Author : Stanford M. Lyman
Publisher : University of Illinois Press
Release : 1995
Page : 398
Category : Minorities
ISBN 13 : 9780252064753
Description :


For nearly a century, the discourse on ethnoracial minorities in the United States has been framed by debates over assimilation versus pluralism. In this challenging look at race, culture, and the nature of integration, Stanford Lyman explores that discourse, from its philosophical origins in intellectual responses to the "Jewish Question" to its contemporary formulations. Lyman's subjects range from Robert E. Park's shifting views on the relation between assimilation and civilizational advance through the imagery of ethnic groups found in novels, slave narratives, and film; the challenge to ethnohistorical views represented by the Chinese diaspora; and the "badge of slavery" that Asian, Hispanic, and Native American groups have been forced to wear. Finally, Lyman reflects on the innovative ways of speaking, writing, and acting forged by the revival of race consciousness and offers a perspective on how to understand more constructively the major African-American literary and social critics.


Author : Valerie J. Matsumoto
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release : 2019-06-30
Page : 272
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1501711911
Description :


In 1919, against a backdrop of a long history of anti-Asian nativism, a handful of Japanese families established Cortez Colony in a bleak pocket of the San Joachin Valley. Valerie Matsumoto chronicles conflicts within the community as well as obstacles from without as the colonists responded to the challenges of settlement, the setbacks of the Great Depression, the hardships of World War II internment, and the opportunities of postwar reconstruction. Tracing the evolution of gender and family roles of members of Cortez as well as their cultural, religious, and educational institutions, she documents the persistence and flexibility of ethnic community and demonstrates its range of meaning from geographic location and web of social relations to state of mind.