On The Animal Masks In The Autobiographical Graphic Novel Maus By Art Spiegelman Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Özlem Arslan
Publisher :
Release : 2019-07-23
Page : 20
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9783346023513
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2019 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, University of Wuppertal (Geistes- und Kulturwissenschaften), course: The Holocaust in Eastern Europe in History and American Literature, language: English, abstract: This term paper aims to examine the function of the animal masks in Art Spiegelman's graphic novel "Maus" with the question in mind whether it trivializes the Holocaust or not. The paper will begin with an introduction to the different types of animal heads and the possible reasons for the choice of the artist by giving some historical background. The main part will discuss the use of the animal masks and its functions by analyzing significant panels from "MAUS". Finally, the paper will also contain a conclusion in which the results will be summarized. "MAUS" is an autobiographically written graphic novel by Art Spiegelman which consists of two parts, "Maus I" (1986) and "Maus II" (1992), and tells the story of the artist's parents, Anja and Vladek, who survived the Holocaust and the reader also gets a view on the afterlife of Vladek and his relationship with his son "Artie". Art Spiegelman received a lot of praise and was celebrated in the press for his work. Amongst other achievements, he was honored with the Pulitzer Prize for "MAUS" in 1992. However, his graphic novel was also criticized for the use of animal masks for the characters. To elaborate on this, Spiegelman chose to depict the affiliation to a religion or culture of characters by using animal make in the past and present time of the graphic novel. For example, cats for Germans, mice for Jews and pigs for Poles. Especially the representation of Jews as mice and Poles as pigs caused many negative critiques from Jewish and Polish people themselves. Furthermore, Spiegelman's presentation method was criticized for naturalizing something unnatural, which means it was perceived as trivializing the Holocaust and by that insulting the victims. Even though t


Author : Özlem Arslan
Publisher : GRIN Verlag
Release : 2019-09-30
Page : 12
Category : Literary Collections
ISBN 13 : 3346023508
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2019 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, University of Wuppertal (Geistes- und Kulturwissenschaften), course: The Holocaust in Eastern Europe in History and American Literature, language: English, abstract: This term paper aims to examine the function of the animal masks in Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel "Maus" with the question in mind whether it trivializes the Holocaust or not. The paper will begin with an introduction to the different types of animal heads and the possible reasons for the choice of the artist by giving some historical background. The main part will discuss the use of the animal masks and its functions by analyzing significant panels from "MAUS". Finally, the paper will also contain a conclusion in which the results will be summarized. "MAUS" is an autobiographically written graphic novel by Art Spiegelman which consists of two parts, "Maus I" (1986) and "Maus II" (1992), and tells the story of the artist’s parents, Anja and Vladek, who survived the Holocaust and the reader also gets a view on the afterlife of Vladek and his relationship with his son "Artie". Art Spiegelman received a lot of praise and was celebrated in the press for his work. Amongst other achievements, he was honored with the Pulitzer Prize for "MAUS" in 1992. However, his graphic novel was also criticized for the use of animal masks for the characters. To elaborate on this, Spiegelman chose to depict the affiliation to a religion or culture of characters by using animal make in the past and present time of the graphic novel. For example, cats for Germans, mice for Jews and pigs for Poles. Especially the representation of Jews as mice and Poles as pigs caused many negative critiques from Jewish and Polish people themselves. Furthermore, Spiegelman’s presentation method was criticized for naturalizing something unnatural, which means it was perceived as trivializing the Holocaust and by that insulting the victims. Even though the use of animal masks was criticized for in a way trivializing the Holocaust, one could also argue that the animal heads function as a medium to demonstrate the racist ideology of the Nazis and the hierarchies during that time. In addition, one could also argue that the presence of the animal heads in the present time of the graphic novel indicate the effects and consequences for the persons related after the Holocaust. These different perspectives on this topic raised the question of whether the graphic novel really trivializes the Holocaust or not.


Author : Charles Hatfield
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release : 2009-11-12
Page : 256
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9781604735871
Description :


In the 1980s, a sea change occurred in comics. Fueled by Art Spiegel- man and Françoise Mouly's avant-garde anthology Raw and the launch of the Love & Rockets series by Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario Hernandez, the decade saw a deluge of comics that were more autobiographical, emotionally realistic, and experimental than anything seen before. These alternative comics were not the scatological satires of the 1960s underground, nor were they brightly colored newspaper strips or superhero comic books. In Alternative Comics: An Emerging Literature, Charles Hatfield establishes the parameters of alternative comics by closely examining long-form comics, in particular the graphic novel. He argues that these are fundamentally a literary form and offers an extensive critical study of them both as a literary genre and as a cultural phenomenon. Combining sharp-eyed readings and illustrations from particular texts with a larger understanding of the comics as an art form, this book discusses the development of specific genres, such as autobiography and history. Alternative Comics analyzes such seminal works as Spiegelman's Maus, Gilbert Hernandez's Palomar: The Heartbreak Soup Stories, and Justin Green's Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary. Hatfield explores how issues outside of cartooning-the marketplace, production demands, work schedules-can affect the final work. Using Hernandez's Palomar as an example, he shows how serialization may determine the way a cartoonist structures a narrative. In a close look at Maus, Binky Brown, and Harvey Pekar's American Splendor, Hatfield teases out the complications of creating biography and autobiography in a substantially visual medium, and shows how creators approach these issues in radically different ways.


Author : Timo Müller
Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release : 2017-01-11
Page : 469
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 3110422425
Description :


Increasing specialization within the discipline of English and American Studies has shifted the focus of scholarly discussion toward theoretical reflection and cultural contexts. These developments have benefitted the discipline in more ways than one, but they have also resulted in a certain neglect of close reading. As a result, students and researchers interested in such material are forced to turn to scholarship from the 1960s and 1970s, much of which relies on dated methodological and ideological presuppositions. The handbook aims to fill this gap by providing new readings of texts that figure prominently in the literature classroom and in scholarly debate − from James’s The Ambassadors to McCarthy’s The Road. These readings do not revert naively to a time “before theory.” Instead, they distil the insights of literary and cultural theory into concise introductions to the historical background, the themes, the formal strategies, and the reception of influential literary texts, and they do so in a jargon-free language accessible to readers on all levels of qualification.


Author : Patrick Spieß
Publisher :
Release : 2013-12
Page : 24
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9783656562405
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,3, Martin Luther University, language: English, abstract: This seminar paper deals with the graphic novel "Maus" by Art Spiegelman. The book was published in two volumes. The first volume with the subtitle: "My Father Bleeds History"(1986) and the second volume had the subtitle: "And Here My Troubles Began" (1991). The novel is about the genocide of European Jews. The action is centered on the Holocaust survivor Vladek Spiegelman, who was imprisoned in Auschwitz. His son Art Spiegelman reconstructs the story of his father by interviewing him and taking notes. During the novel the author Art Spiegelman informs the reader also about his mother Anja and himself. First of all, there is the question of how to deal with the medium comic, because comics represent actually funny stories but the Holocaust is anything but funny thus they are extreme opposites. However, Spiegelman started a new era of comics, because he showed which opportunities exist in this medium and introduced the genre to a mass audience. He was able to do this, because he does not want to tell the complete history of the Holocaust but only a story of a survivor. The book includes three different time levels. The first one is the tale of woe of his father, who survives the Holocaust, the second one is where Art interviews his father about his experiences and memories and the third time level acts after Vladek's death and shows Art working on the second volume of "Maus." Due to the jumping between the time levels emerges close connection between present and past, thereby the story appears truer. The exact title of this seminar paper is Characterization and symbolism in "Maus" and will deal with the question of what happens with stereotypes of nationalism and how Spiegelman reflect personalities. First, the genre of the book will be examined by characteristics of fables and allegories. Furthermore


Author : Hans-Joachim Hahn
Ole Frahm
Publisher : Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Release : 2021-08-09
Page : 420
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 3205210662
Description :


Beyond MAUS. The Legacy of Holocaust Comics collects 16 contributions that shed new light on the representation of the Holocaust. While MAUS by Art Spiegelman has changed the perspectives, other comics and series of drawings, some produced while the Holocaust happened, are often not recognised by a wider public. A plethora of works still waits to be discovered, like early caricatures and comics referring to the extermination of the Jews, graphic series by survivors or horror stories from 1950s comic books. The volume provides overviews about the depictions of Jews as animals, the representation of prisoner societies in comics as well as in depth studies about distorted traces of the Holocaust in Hergé’s Tintin and in Spirou, the Holocaust in Mangas, and Holocaust comics in Poland and Israel, recent graphic novels and the use of these comics in schools. With contributions from different disciplines, the volume also grants new perspectives on comic scholarship.


Author : Art Spiegelman
Publisher : Pantheon Books
Release : 1992-09-01
Page : 144
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9780780744172
Description :


The continuation of Spiegelman's story of his father's life as a concentration camp survivor. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Spiegelman balances flashbacks of his father's harrowing Holocaust experiences with scenes of the present.


Author : Stephen Harlan Norwood
Publisher : ABC-CLIO
Release : 2008
Page : 775
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1851096388
Description :


Traces the history of Jews in the United States, providing demographics and information on their influence on and participation in American culture, leading figures, organizations, and communities.


Author : Jan Baetens
Publisher : Leuven University Press
Release : 2001
Page : 212
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9789058671097
Description :


The essays collected in this volume were first presented at the international and interdisciplinary conference on the Graphic Novel hosted by the Institute for Cultural Studies (University of Leuven) in 2000.The issues discusses by the conference are twofold. Firstly, that of trauma representation, an issue escaping by definition from any imaginable specific field. Secondly, that of a wide range of topics concerning the concept of "visual narrative," an issue which can only be studied by comparing as many media and practices as possible.The essays of this volume are grouped here in two major parts, their focus depending on either a more general topic or on a very specific graphic author. The first part of the book, "Violence and trauma in the Graphic Novel", opens with a certain number of reflections on the representation of violence in literary and visual graphic novels, and continues with a whole set of close readings of graphic novels by Art Spiegelman (Maus I and II) and Jacques Tardi (whose masterwork "C'?tait la guerre des tranch'es" is still waiting for its complete English translation). The second part of the book presents in the first place a survey of the current graphic novel production, and insists sharply on the great diversity of the range in the various 'continental' traditions (for instance underground 'comix', and feminist comics, high-art graphic novels, critical superheroes-fiction) whose separation is nowadays increasingly difficult to maintain. It continues and ends with a set of theoretical interventions where not only the reciprocal influences of national and international traditions, but also those between genres and media are strongly forwarded, the emphasis being here mainly on problems concerning ways of looking and positions of spectatorship.


Author : Robert Petersen
Publisher : Praeger
Release : 2010-11-18
Page : 274
Category : Comics & Graphic Novels
ISBN 13 : 0313363315
Description :


This text examines comics, graphic novels, and manga with a broad, international scope that reveals their conceptual origins in antiquity. • Includes numerous illustrations of British satirical prints, Japanese woodblock prints, and the art of prominent illustrators • Includes a chapter on the latest developments in digital comics


Author : Hertha D. Sweet Wong
Publisher : UNC Press Books
Release : 2018-05-02
Page : 280
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1469640716
Description :


In this book, Hertha D. Sweet Wong examines the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of twentieth- and twenty-first-century American writers and artists who employ a mix of written and visual forms of self-narration. Combining approaches from autobiography studies and visual studies, Wong argues that, in grappling with the breakdown of stable definitions of identity and unmediated representation, these writers-artists experiment with hybrid autobiography in image and text to break free of inherited visual-verbal regimes and revise painful histories. These works provide an interart focus for examining the possibilities of self-representation and self-narration, the boundaries of life writing, and the relationship between image and text. Wong considers eight writers-artists, including comic-book author Art Spiegelman; Faith Ringgold, known for her story quilts; and celebrated Indigenous writer Leslie Marmon Silko. Wong shows how her subjects formulate webs of intersubjectivity shaped by historical trauma, geography, race, and gender as they envision new possibilities of selfhood and fresh modes of self-narration in word and image.


Author : Simon Essig
Publisher : GRIN Verlag
Release : 2014-08-19
Page : 34
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 3656721246
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2013 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,0, University of Tubingen (Philosophische Fakultät), course: Popular Culture, language: English, abstract: Representing the Holocaust in a comic book is a daring enterprise; doing it with animal figures is even bolder. Spiegelman's work Maus braves many conventions of dealing with the Holocaust but reconstructs it in an unprecedented and unique manner. By exceeding literary boundaries and generic expectations, it is thus an essential addition to Holocaust literature. [...] This paper analyzes the animal metaphor in Spiegelman's Maus. It examines and discusses the different spheres in which the functions of the animal metaphor become evident. First, this paper traces back to the origins of using animals in literature. After a brief historical introduction of the sources and the development of animal figures, chapter 2 explains their literary function and their significance in comic books. Chapter 3 delivers a brief overview of Maus. It includes a synopsis of the comic's plot as well as a summary of its reception. Chapter 4, the main part of this paper, investigates the various functions and receptions of the animal metaphor in Maus from different perspectives. In chapter 4.1, Spiegelman's personal explanations reveal how Maus's animal characters function for him as a second generation witness. Chapter 4.2 focuses upon these implications brought into play with the use of the mask. A further subject, discussed in chapter 4.3, is how the animal imagery serves as a distancing and defamiliarizing device in order to deal with the horror of the Holocaust. Chapter 4.4 discusses the interconnection between both features. In chapter 4.5, the examination tries further to comprehend how the animal metaphor contributes to the reconstruction of ethnicity and identity in Maus. Since any analysis of a comic book must not neglect its visual dimension, chapter 4.6 considers Maus's drawing style and the significance of its visual representation. Maus has attracted many critics and its reception has been diverse and manifold. Target of the criticism has been especially the use of animals as substitutes for human beings. Chapter 4.7 examines and discusses Maus's animal device from a critical point of view regarding its incongruities and problems brought into play with the association of human beings and animals. The last chapter summarizes the insights of the analysis and discusses in what way Maus's animal metaphor strikes a new path in the conception and reconstruction of the Holocaust.


Author : Michael A. Chaney
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release : 2017-02-17
Page : 192
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1496810260
Description :


Literary scholar Michael A. Chaney examines graphic novels to illustrate that in form and function they inform readers on how they ought to be read. His arguments result in an innovative analysis of the various knowledges that comics produce and the methods artists and writers employ to convey them. Theoretically eclectic, this study attends to the lessons taught by both the form and content of today's most celebrated graphic novels. Chaney analyzes the embedded lessons in comics and graphic novels through the form's central tropes: the iconic child storyteller and the inherent childishness of comics in American culture; the use of mirrors and masks as ciphers of the unconscious; embedded puzzles and games in otherwise story-driven comic narratives; and the form's self-reflexive propensity for showing its work. Comics reveal the labor that goes into producing them, embedding lessons on how to read the "work" as a whole. Throughout, Chaney draws from a range of theoretical insights from psychoanalysis and semiotics to theories of reception and production from film studies, art history, and media studies. Some of the major texts examined include Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis; Chris Ware's Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth; Joe Sacco's Palestine; David B.'s Epileptic; Kyle Baker's Nat Turner; and many more. As Chaney's examples show, graphic novels teach us even as they create meaning in their infinite relay between words and pictures.


Author : Karin Kukkonen
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release : 2013-09-10
Page : 190
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 111849993X
Description :


This introduction to studying comics and graphic novels is a structured guide to a popular topic. It deploys new cognitive methods of textual analysis and features activities and exercises throughout. Deploys novel cognitive approaches to analyze the importance of psychological and physical aspects of reader experience Carefully structured to build a sequenced, rounded introduction to the subject Includes study activities, writing exercises, and essay topics throughout Dedicated chapters cover popular sub-genres such as autobiography and literary adaptation


Author : Michael A. Chaney
Publisher : Univ of Wisconsin Press
Release : 2011-03-01
Page : 339
Category : Comics & Graphic Novels
ISBN 13 : 0299251039
Description :


Some of the most noteworthy graphic novels and comic books of recent years have been entirely autobiographical. In Graphic Subjects, Michael A. Chaney brings together a lively mix of scholars to examine the use of autobiography within graphic novels, including such critically acclaimed examples as Art Spiegelman’s Maus, David Beauchard’s Epileptic, Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, Alan Moore’s Watchmen, and Gene Yang’s American Born Chinese. These essays, accompanied by visual examples, illuminate the new horizons that illustrated autobiographical narrative creates. The volume insightfully highlights the ways that graphic novelists and literary cartoonists have incorporated history, experience, and life stories into their work. The result is a challenging and innovative collection that reveals the combined power of autobiography and the graphic novel.


Author : Harry Brod
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2016-01-12
Page : 240
Category : Comics & Graphic Novels
ISBN 13 : 1416595317
Description :


"Harry Brod situates superheroes within the course of Jewish-American history: they are aliens in a foreign land, like Superman; figures plagued by guilt for abandoning their families, like Spider-Man; and outsiders persecuted for being different, like the X-Men. Brod blends humor and sharp observation as he considers the overt and discreet Jewish characteristics of these well-known figures and explores how their creators integrated their Jewish identities and their creativity."--From publisher description.


Author : Christoph Kohls
Publisher : GRIN Verlag
Release : 2017-02-03
Page : 23
Category : Literary Collections
ISBN 13 : 3668391424
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2.3, Ruhr-University of Bochum (Historisches Institut), course: YIDDISCHKEIT: THE LITERARY AND POPULAR CULTURES OF YIDDISH SPEAKING JEWS, 1750-2000, language: English, abstract: In the 1930s, about 5,2 million Jews were able to speak Yiddish in Eastern Europe, but after the Second World War almost five million of them were dead. This led to a declining importance and use of the Yiddish language. But it is not a dead language but a language that gained interest of the descendants of the former yiddish-speaking Jews and research at the universities and gets more and more known. Furthermore, there are still speakers of Yiddish, mostly in the ultra-orthodox milieu in Israel. To show that Yiddish is still used, I will examine the graphic novel “Maus“ by the American author Art Spiegelman whose parents immigrated to the USA in the early 1950s. It deals with the story of his jewish father in Poland during the Second World War. This paper shall deal with the use of Yiddish and Yinglish and its representation in the graphic novel. The aim of this paper is to show that traces of Yiddish can be found even in a graphic novel. Following that aim, chapter I.A deals with the immigration of Jews to the USA and the impact that the big jewish community in America had on the American language – the influence of Yiddish on English and the other way round. The second chapter (II.) focuses on the life of Jews in Poland and their use of Yiddish. The chapter shall give an overview of the social premises, the Jews lived in. Nevertheless it shall also give a short introduction of the Yiddish language and how it was used. As the graphic novel deals with the Holocaust, the third chapter (III.) sums up the events after the invasion of the German Reich to Poland and shows what the Germans did to Poland. Furthermore the important polish places for the graphic novel are introduced. The next chapter introduces Art Spiegelman and gives a short biography of him. Furthermore his work “Maus“ will be represented and a short summary of the graphic novel focusing on the storyline in the 1930s and 1940s will be given. Chapter V. now analyzes the use and representation of Yiddish and in the last Chapter a conclusion will be drawn towards the question, how Yiddish is represented in “Maus“.


Author : Esther Cohen
Leona Toker
Publisher :
Release : 2012
Page : 406
Category : PSYCHOLOGY
ISBN 13 : 9401208573
Description :


Pain studies, both in exact sciences and in the humanities, are a fast-shifting field. This volume condenses a spectrum of recent views of pain through the lens of humanistic studies. Methodologically, the volume is an interdisciplinary study of the quest


Author : Sebastian Domsch
Dan Hassler-Forest
Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release : 2021-07-05
Page : 644
Category : Comics & Graphic Novels
ISBN 13 : 3110446839
Description :


Whether one describes them as sequential art, graphic narratives or graphic novels, comics have become a vital part of contemporary culture. Their range of expression contains a tremendous variety of forms, genres and modes − from high to low, from serial entertainment for children to complex works of art. This has led to a growing interest in comics as a field of scholarly analysis, as comics studies has established itself as a major branch of criticism. This handbook combines a systematic survey of theories and concepts developed in the field alongside an overview of the most important contexts and themes and a wealth of close readings of seminal works and authors. It will prove to be an indispensable handbook for a large readership, ranging from researchers and instructors to students and anyone else with a general interest in this fascinating medium.


Author : Carlos E. Cortés
Publisher : SAGE Publications
Release : 2013-08-15
Page : 2528
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1452276269
Description :


This comprehensive title is among the first to extensively use newly released 2010 U.S. Census data to examine multiculturalism today and tomorrow in America. This distinction is important considering the following NPR report by Eyder Peralta: “Based on the first national numbers released by the Census Bureau, the AP reports that minorities account for 90 percent of the total U.S. growth since 2000, due to immigration and higher birth rates for Latinos.” According to John Logan, a Brown University sociologist who has analyzed most of the census figures, “The futures of most metropolitan areas in the country are contingent on how attractive they are to Hispanic and Asian populations.” Both non-Hispanic whites and blacks are getting older as a group. “These groups are tending to fade out,” he added. Another demographer, William H. Frey with the Brookings Institution, told The Washington Post that this has been a pivotal decade. “We’re pivoting from a white-black-dominated American population to one that is multiracial and multicultural.” Multicultural America: A Multimedia Encyclopedia explores this pivotal moment and its ramifications with more than 900 signed entries not just providing a compilation of specific ethnic groups and their histories but also covering the full spectrum of issues flowing from the increasingly multicultural canvas that is America today. Pedagogical elements include an introduction, a thematic reader’s guide, a chronology of multicultural milestones, a glossary, a resource guide to key books, journals, and Internet sites, and an appendix of 2010 U.S. Census Data. Finally, the electronic version will be the only reference work on this topic to augment written entries with multimedia for today’s students, with 100 videos (with transcripts) from Getty Images and Video Vault, the Agence France Press, and Sky News, as reviewed by the media librarian of the Rutgers University Libraries, working in concert with the title’s editors.