The Animal Metaphor In Art Spiegelman S Maus Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Simon Essig
Publisher : GRIN Verlag
Release : 2014-08-19
Page : 34
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 3656721246
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2013 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,0, University of Tubingen (Philosophische Fakultät), course: Popular Culture, language: English, abstract: Representing the Holocaust in a comic book is a daring enterprise; doing it with animal figures is even bolder. Spiegelman's work Maus braves many conventions of dealing with the Holocaust but reconstructs it in an unprecedented and unique manner. By exceeding literary boundaries and generic expectations, it is thus an essential addition to Holocaust literature. [...] This paper analyzes the animal metaphor in Spiegelman's Maus. It examines and discusses the different spheres in which the functions of the animal metaphor become evident. First, this paper traces back to the origins of using animals in literature. After a brief historical introduction of the sources and the development of animal figures, chapter 2 explains their literary function and their significance in comic books. Chapter 3 delivers a brief overview of Maus. It includes a synopsis of the comic's plot as well as a summary of its reception. Chapter 4, the main part of this paper, investigates the various functions and receptions of the animal metaphor in Maus from different perspectives. In chapter 4.1, Spiegelman's personal explanations reveal how Maus's animal characters function for him as a second generation witness. Chapter 4.2 focuses upon these implications brought into play with the use of the mask. A further subject, discussed in chapter 4.3, is how the animal imagery serves as a distancing and defamiliarizing device in order to deal with the horror of the Holocaust. Chapter 4.4 discusses the interconnection between both features. In chapter 4.5, the examination tries further to comprehend how the animal metaphor contributes to the reconstruction of ethnicity and identity in Maus. Since any analysis of a comic book must not neglect its visual dimension, chapter 4.6 considers Maus's drawing style and the significance of its visual representation. Maus has attracted many critics and its reception has been diverse and manifold. Target of the criticism has been especially the use of animals as substitutes for human beings. Chapter 4.7 examines and discusses Maus's animal device from a critical point of view regarding its incongruities and problems brought into play with the association of human beings and animals. The last chapter summarizes the insights of the analysis and discusses in what way Maus's animal metaphor strikes a new path in the conception and reconstruction of the Holocaust.


Author : Ahmet Deniz
Publisher : GRIN Verlag
Release : 2021-02-03
Page : 12
Category : Foreign Language Study
ISBN 13 : 3346339548
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2020 in the subject Didactics - English - Literature, Works, University of Passau, language: English, abstract: The aim of this paper is to find out the reason why animal characters are so common in graphic novels and also if there is a deeper meaning behind the concrete chosen animals. Because it would go beyond the scope of this papers purpose I will just pick the animal metaphor in Spiegelman’s work ,,Maus“ as an example, as it is best suited for this topic in my opinion. After trying to find a definition of the medium comic at the beginning, a brief overview of the animal metaphor in literature is given. In the next step, the meaning and history of animals in comics is clarified and it is also briefly explained why comic authors decide to choose animal characters in their works that symbolically replace people. Last but not least, the main part of this homework follows, in which the animal metaphor in Art Spiegelman’s "Maus“ is taken apart. First the reader is given a brief overview of the content of the comic, then some concrete examples from the work are given. The next one explains why Art Spiegelman exactly chose the animals that represent the different nations of the world that appear in his comic. Since the work was discussed very controversially in public, its reception is quickly discussed too. The seminar paper is rounded off with a summarizing conclusion.


Author : Art Spiegelman
Publisher : Pantheon Books
Release : 1992-09-01
Page : 144
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9780780744172
Description :


The continuation of Spiegelman's story of his father's life as a concentration camp survivor. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Spiegelman balances flashbacks of his father's harrowing Holocaust experiences with scenes of the present.


Author : Joseph Witek
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release : 1989
Page : 164
Category : Antiques & Collectibles
ISBN 13 : 9780878054060
Description :


Describes changing public attitudes towards comic books


Author : Art Spiegelman
Publisher : Pantheon
Release : 2011
Page : 299
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 037542394X
Description :


A New Yorker contributor and co-founder of RAW traces the creative process that went into his Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, revealing the inspirations for his work while providing on an accompanying DVD a reference copy of The Complete Maus and audio interviews with his father.


Author : Ole Frahm
Hans-Joachim Hahn
Publisher : Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Release : 2021-08-09
Page : 424
Category :
ISBN 13 : 3205210654
Description :


Beyond MAUS. The Legacy of Holocaust Comics collects 16 contributions that shed new light on the representation of the Holocaust. While MAUS by Art Spiegelman has changed the perspectives, other comics and series of drawings, some produced while the Holocaust happened, are often not recognised by a wider public. A plethora of works still waits to be discovered, like early caricatures and comics referring to the extermination of the Jews, graphic series by survivors or horror stories from 1950s comic books. The volume provides overviews about the depictions of Jews as animals, the representation of prisoner societies in comics as well as in depth studies about distorted traces of the Holocaust in Herge's Tintin and in Spirou, the Holocaust in Mangas, and Holocaust comics in Poland and Israel, recent graphic novels and the use of these comics in schools. With contributions from different disciplines, the volume also grants new perspectives on comic scholarship.


Author : Patrick Spieß
Publisher :
Release : 2013-12
Page : 24
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9783656562405
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,3, Martin Luther University, language: English, abstract: This seminar paper deals with the graphic novel "Maus" by Art Spiegelman. The book was published in two volumes. The first volume with the subtitle: "My Father Bleeds History"(1986) and the second volume had the subtitle: "And Here My Troubles Began" (1991). The novel is about the genocide of European Jews. The action is centered on the Holocaust survivor Vladek Spiegelman, who was imprisoned in Auschwitz. His son Art Spiegelman reconstructs the story of his father by interviewing him and taking notes. During the novel the author Art Spiegelman informs the reader also about his mother Anja and himself. First of all, there is the question of how to deal with the medium comic, because comics represent actually funny stories but the Holocaust is anything but funny thus they are extreme opposites. However, Spiegelman started a new era of comics, because he showed which opportunities exist in this medium and introduced the genre to a mass audience. He was able to do this, because he does not want to tell the complete history of the Holocaust but only a story of a survivor. The book includes three different time levels. The first one is the tale of woe of his father, who survives the Holocaust, the second one is where Art interviews his father about his experiences and memories and the third time level acts after Vladek's death and shows Art working on the second volume of "Maus." Due to the jumping between the time levels emerges close connection between present and past, thereby the story appears truer. The exact title of this seminar paper is Characterization and symbolism in "Maus" and will deal with the question of what happens with stereotypes of nationalism and how Spiegelman reflect personalities. First, the genre of the book will be examined by characteristics of fables and allegories. Furthermore


Author : Patrick Spieß
Publisher : GRIN Verlag
Release : 2011-04-04
Page : 17
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 3640883160
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,3, Martin Luther University, language: English, abstract: This seminar paper deals with the graphic novel “Maus” by Art Spiegelman. The book was published in two volumes. The first volume with the subtitle: “My Father Bleeds History”(1986) and the second volume had the subtitle: “And Here My Troubles Began” (1991). The novel is about the genocide of European Jews. The action is centered on the Holocaust survivor Vladek Spiegelman, who was imprisoned in Auschwitz. His son Art Spiegelman reconstructs the story of his father by interviewing him and taking notes. During the novel the author Art Spiegelman informs the reader also about his mother Anja and himself. First of all, there is the question of how to deal with the medium comic, because comics represent actually funny stories but the Holocaust is anything but funny thus they are extreme opposites. However, Spiegelman started a new era of comics, because he showed which opportunities exist in this medium and introduced the genre to a mass audience. He was able to do this, because he does not want to tell the complete history of the Holocaust but only a story of a survivor. The book includes three different time levels. The first one is the tale of woe of his father, who survives the Holocaust, the second one is where Art interviews his father about his experiences and memories and the third time level acts after Vladek's death and shows Art working on the second volume of “Maus”. Due to the jumping between the time levels emerges close connection between present and past, thereby the story appears truer. The exact title of this seminar paper is Characterization and symbolism in “Maus” and will deal with the question of what happens with stereotypes of nationalism and how Spiegelman reflect personalities. First, the genre of the book will be examined by characteristics of fables and allegories. Furthermore, the question will be why Spiegelman decided to choose animal figures and how he characterized them and which advantages the choice of animals in correspondence with the medium comic has. The characterization and symbolism will be mostly checked on the basis of the primary literature. Critical voices will be obtained by secondary literature. Moreover, this seminar paper will amplify several symbols and metaphors and ultimately, the last chapter will try to read out a moral and a massage. Questions whether “Maus” is a biography or an autobiography, yiddishkeit and parenthood will be left out, because it would go beyond the scope of this paper.


Author : Jerzy Kosinski
Publisher : Bantam Books
Release : 1983-03
Page : 251
Category : Abandoned children
ISBN 13 : 9780553236316
Description :


Trieste en wrede, maar ontroerende geschiedenis van een voortdurend opgejaagde jongen in het door de nazi's bezette, hongerende Oost-Europa.


Author : Sarah Ruhnau
Publisher : GRIN Verlag
Release : 2010
Page : 40
Category :
ISBN 13 : 3640609972
Description :


Seminar paper from the year 2009 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,7, Ruhr-University of Bochum (Englisches Seminar), course: Jewish American Literature, language: English, abstract: In the following paper I would like to examine to what extent the Holocaust is appropriate as a literary inspiration. I will cite Art Spiegelman's comic strips MAUS I and MAUS II (with focus on the latter) as examples since they are two of the most extraordinary works among Holocaust literature and art. In general I want to demonstrate that Adorno's thesis about the impossibility of writing about the Holocaust is not true. By giving the example of Spiegelman's MAUS it should be made clear that it is even possible to use the Holocaust as some kind of inspiration in a fairly unusual way.


Author : Philip Smith
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2015-12-07
Page : 148
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1317352432
Description :


The horror of the Holocaust lies not only in its brutality but in its scale and logistics; it depended upon the machinery and logic of a rational, industrialised, and empirically organised modern society. The central thesis of this book is that Art Spiegelman’s comics all identify deeply-rooted madness in post-Enlightenment society. Spiegelman maintains, in other words, that the Holocaust was not an aberration, but an inevitable consequence of modernisation. In service of this argument, Smith offers a reading of Spiegelman’s comics, with a particular focus on his three main collections: Breakdowns (1977 and 2008), Maus (1980 and 1991), and In the Shadow of No Towers (2004). He draws upon a taxonomy of terms from comic book scholarship, attempts to theorize madness (including literary portrayals of trauma), and critical works on Holocaust literature.


Author : Lukas Etter
Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release : 2020-12-16
Page : 228
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 3110693798
Description :


Distinctive Styles and Authorship in Alternative Comics addresses the benefits and limits of analyses of style in alternative comics. It offers three close readings of works serially published between 1980 and 2018 – Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Alison Bechdel’s Dykes to Watch Out For, and Jason Lutes’ Berlin – and discusses how artistic style may influence the ways in which readers construct authorship.


Author : Astrid Erll
Roy Sommer
Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release : 2019-07-08
Page : 329
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 3110654377
Description :


The collection showcases new research in the field of cultural and historical narratology. Starting from the premise of the ‘semantisation of narrative forms’ (A. Nünning), it explores the cultural situatedness and historical transformations of narrative, with contributors developing new perspectives on key concepts of cultural and historical narratology, such as unreliable narration and multiperspectivity. The volume introduces original approaches to the study of narrative in culture, highlighting its pivotal role for attention, memory, and resilience studies, and for the imagination of crises, the Anthropocene, and the Post-Apocalypse. Addressing both fictional and non-fictional narratives, individual essays analyze the narrative-making and unmaking of Europe, Brexit, and the Postcolonial. Finally, the collection features new research on narrative in media culture, looking at the narrative logic of graphic novels, picture books, and newsmedia.


Author : Katalin Orban
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2013-09-13
Page : 224
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1135466327
Description :


First Published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


Author : Sands Danielle Sands
Publisher : Edinburgh University Press
Release : 2019-08-21
Page : 224
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1474439055
Description :


Combining recent insights from animal studies, critical plant studies and the new materialisms, Danielle Sands reads fiction and philosophy alongside each other to propose a method of thinking of and with animals that draws on a bestiary of affects. She challenges the claim that empathy should be primary mode of engagement with nonhuman life. Instead, she looks at the stories that we tell, and are told, by insects - beings at the edges of animal life. The indifference, even disgust, that these creatures evoke in us forms the basis for a new ethics not limited by empathy. Along the way she encounters fiction writers Yann Martel, Karen Joy Fowler, Han Kang and Jim Crace beside the philosophy of Graham Harman, Donna Haraway, Jacques Derrida and Roger Caillois.


Author : Jan Baetens
Publisher : Leuven University Press
Release : 2001
Page : 212
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9789058671097
Description :


The essays collected in this volume were first presented at the international and interdisciplinary conference on the Graphic Novel hosted by the Institute for Cultural Studies (University of Leuven) in 2000.The issues discusses by the conference are twofold. Firstly, that of trauma representation, an issue escaping by definition from any imaginable specific field. Secondly, that of a wide range of topics concerning the concept of "visual narrative," an issue which can only be studied by comparing as many media and practices as possible.The essays of this volume are grouped here in two major parts, their focus depending on either a more general topic or on a very specific graphic author. The first part of the book, "Violence and trauma in the Graphic Novel", opens with a certain number of reflections on the representation of violence in literary and visual graphic novels, and continues with a whole set of close readings of graphic novels by Art Spiegelman (Maus I and II) and Jacques Tardi (whose masterwork "C'?tait la guerre des tranch'es" is still waiting for its complete English translation). The second part of the book presents in the first place a survey of the current graphic novel production, and insists sharply on the great diversity of the range in the various 'continental' traditions (for instance underground 'comix', and feminist comics, high-art graphic novels, critical superheroes-fiction) whose separation is nowadays increasingly difficult to maintain. It continues and ends with a set of theoretical interventions where not only the reciprocal influences of national and international traditions, but also those between genres and media are strongly forwarded, the emphasis being here mainly on problems concerning ways of looking and positions of spectatorship.


Author : Jeff McLaughlin
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release : 2017-08-18
Page : 228
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1496813308
Description :


Contributions by Eric Bain-Selbo, Jeremy Barris, Maria Botero, Manuel "Mandel" Cabrera Jr., David J. Leichter, Ian MacRae, Alfonso Munoz-Corcuera, Corry Shores, and Jarkko S. Tuusvuori In a follow-up to Comics as Philosophy, international contributors address two questions: Which philosophical insights, concepts, and tools can shed light on the graphic novel? And how can the graphic novel cast light on the concerns of philosophy? Each contributor ponders a well-known graphic novel to illuminate ways in which philosophy can untangle particular combinations of image and written word for deeper understanding. Jeff McLaughlin collects a range of essays to examine notable graphic novels within the framework posited by these two questions. One essay discusses how a philosopher discovered that the panels in Jeff Lemire's Essex County do not just replicate a philosophical argument, but they actually give evidence to an argument that could not have existed otherwise. Another essay reveals how Chris Ware's manipulation of the medium demonstrates an important sense of time and experience. Still another describes why Maus tends to be more profound than later works that address the Holocaust because of, not in spite of, the fact that the characters are cartoon animals rather than human. Other works contemplated include Will Eisner's A Contract with God, Alan Moore and David Lloyd's V for Vendetta, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, and Joe Sacco's Footnotes in Gaza. Mainly, each essay, contributor, graphic novelist, and artist are all doing the same thing: trying to tell us how the world is--at least from their point of view.


Author : Laurike in 't Veld
Publisher : Springer
Release : 2018-12-19
Page : 230
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 303003626X
Description :


This book mobilises the concept of kitsch to investigate the tensions around the representation of genocide in international graphic novels that focus on the Holocaust and the genocides in Armenia, Rwanda, and Bosnia. In response to the predominantly negative readings of kitsch as meaningless or inappropriate, this book offers a fresh approach that considers how some of the kitsch strategies employed in these works facilitate an affective interaction with the genocide narrative. These productive strategies include the use of the visual metaphors of the animal and the doll figure and the explicit and excessive depictions of mass violence. The book also analyses where kitsch still produces problems as it critically examines depictions of perpetrators and the visual and verbal representations of sexual violence. Furthermore, it explores how graphic novels employ anti-kitsch strategies to avoid the dangers of excess in dealing with genocide. The Representation of Genocide in Graphic Novels will appeal to those working in comics-graphic novel studies, popular culture studies, and Holocaust and genocide studies.


Author : Charles Hatfield
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release : 2009-11-12
Page : 256
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9781604735871
Description :


In the 1980s, a sea change occurred in comics. Fueled by Art Spiegel- man and Françoise Mouly's avant-garde anthology Raw and the launch of the Love & Rockets series by Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario Hernandez, the decade saw a deluge of comics that were more autobiographical, emotionally realistic, and experimental than anything seen before. These alternative comics were not the scatological satires of the 1960s underground, nor were they brightly colored newspaper strips or superhero comic books. In Alternative Comics: An Emerging Literature, Charles Hatfield establishes the parameters of alternative comics by closely examining long-form comics, in particular the graphic novel. He argues that these are fundamentally a literary form and offers an extensive critical study of them both as a literary genre and as a cultural phenomenon. Combining sharp-eyed readings and illustrations from particular texts with a larger understanding of the comics as an art form, this book discusses the development of specific genres, such as autobiography and history. Alternative Comics analyzes such seminal works as Spiegelman's Maus, Gilbert Hernandez's Palomar: The Heartbreak Soup Stories, and Justin Green's Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary. Hatfield explores how issues outside of cartooning-the marketplace, production demands, work schedules-can affect the final work. Using Hernandez's Palomar as an example, he shows how serialization may determine the way a cartoonist structures a narrative. In a close look at Maus, Binky Brown, and Harvey Pekar's American Splendor, Hatfield teases out the complications of creating biography and autobiography in a substantially visual medium, and shows how creators approach these issues in radically different ways.


Author : Harriet E. H. Earle
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release : 2017-06-19
Page : 248
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 1496812476
Description :


Conflict and trauma remain among the most prevalent themes in film and literature. Comics has never avoided such narratives, and comics artists are writing them in ways that are both different from and complementary to literature and film. In Comics, Trauma, and the New Art of War, Harriet E. H. Earle brings together two distinct areas of research--trauma studies and comics studies--to provide a new interpretation of a long-standing theme. Focusing on representations of conflict in American comics after the Vietnam War, Earle claims that the comics form is uniquely able to show traumatic experience by representing events as viscerally as possible. Using texts from across the form and placing mainstream superhero comics alongside alternative and art comics, Earle suggests that comics are the ideal artistic representation of trauma. Because comics bridge the gap between the visual and the written, they represent such complicated narratives as loss and trauma in unique ways, particularly through the manipulation of time and experience. Comics can fold time and confront traumatic events, be they personal or shared, through a myriad of both literary and visual devices. As a result, comics can represent trauma in ways that are unavailable to other narrative and artistic forms. With themes such as dreams and mourning, Earle concentrates on trauma in American comics after the Vietnam War. Examples include Alissa Torres's American Widow, Doug Murray's The "Nam, and Art Spiegelman's much-lauded Maus. These works pair with ideas from a wide range of thinkers, including Sigmund Freud, Mikhail Bakhtin, and Fredric Jameson, as well as contemporary trauma theory and clinical psychology. Through these examples and others, Comics, Trauma, and the New Art of War proves that comics open up new avenues to explore personal and public trauma in extraordinary, necessary ways.