The Forgotten Depression Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : James Grant
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2015-11-17
Page : 272
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1451686463
Description :


"By the publisher of the prestigious Grant's Interest Rate Observer, an account of the deep economic slump of 1920-21 that proposes, with respect to federal intervention, "less is more." This is a free-market rejoinder to the Keynesian stimulus applied by Bush and Obama to the 2007-09 recession, in whose aftereffects, Grant asserts, the nation still toils. James Grant tells the story of America's last governmentally-untreated depression; relatively brief and self-correcting, it gave way to the Roaring Twenties. His book appears in the fifth year of a lackluster recovery from the overmedicated downturn of 2007-2009. In 1920-21, Woodrow Wilson and Warren G. Harding met a deep economic slump by seeming to ignore it, implementing policies that most twenty-first century economists would call backward. Confronted with plunging prices, wages, and employment, the government balanced the budget and, through the Federal Reserve, raised interest rates. No "stimulus" was administered, and a powerful, job-filled recovery was under way by late in 1921. In 1929, the economy once again slumped--and kept right on slumping as the Hoover administration adopted the very policies that Wilson and Harding had declined to put in place. Grant argues that well-intended federal intervention, notably the White House-led campaign to prop up industrial wages, helped to turn a bad recession into America's worst depression. He offers the experience of the earlier depression for lessons for today and the future. This is a powerful response to the prevailing notion of how to fight recession. The enterprise system is more resilient than even its friends give it credit for being, Grant demonstrates"--


Author : James Grant
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2014-11-11
Page : 272
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 145168648X
Description :


James Grant’s story of America’s last governmentally untreated depression: A bible for conservative economists, this “carefully researched history…makes difficult economic concepts easy to understand, and it deftly mixes major events with interesting vignettes” (The Wall Street Journal). In 1920-1921, Woodrow Wilson and Warren G. Harding met a deep economic slump by seeming to ignore it, implementing policies that most twenty-first century economists would call backward. Confronted with plunging prices, wages, and employment, the government balanced the budget and, through the Federal Reserve, raised interest rates. No “stimulus” was administered, and a powerful, job-filled recovery was under way by late 1921. Yet by 1929, the economy spiraled downward as the Hoover administration adopted the policies that Wilson and Harding had declined to put in place. In The Forgotten Depression, James Grant “makes a strong case against federal intervention during economic downturns” (Pittsburgh Tribune Review), arguing that the well-intended White House-led campaign to prop up industrial wages helped turn a bad recession into America’s worst depression. He offers examples like this, and many others, as important strategies we can learn from the earlier depression and apply today and to the future. This is a powerful response to the prevailing notion of how to fight recession, and “Mr. Grant’s history lesson is one that all lawmakers could take to heart” (Washington Times).


Author : James Grant
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2014-11-11
Page : 254
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1451686455
Description :


An account of the federally ignored economic slump of 1920-1921 challenges the Keynesian stimulus responses to the 2007-2009 recession, arguing that federal interventions after the 1929 crash served to extend the length of the Great Depression. 40,000 first printing.


Author : Amity Shlaes
Publisher : Harper Collins
Release : 2009-10-13
Page : 512
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0061807214
Description :


In The Forgotten Man, Amity Shlaes, one of the nation's most-respected economic commentators, offers a striking reinterpretation of the Great Depression. She traces the mounting agony of the New Dealers and the moving stories of individual citizens who through their brave perseverance helped establish the steadfast character we recognize as American today.


Author : Robert S. McElvaine
Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
Release : 2009-11-30
Page : 280
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780807898819
Description :


Down and Out in the Great Depression is a moving, revealing collection of letters by the forgotten men, women, and children who suffered through one of the greatest periods of hardship in American history. Sifting through some 15,000 letters from government and private sources, Robert McElvaine has culled nearly 200 communications that best show the problems, thoughts, and emotions of ordinary people during this time. Unlike views of Depression life "from the bottom up" that rely on recollections recorded several decades later, this book captures the daily anguish of people during the thirties. It puts the reader in direct contact with Depression victims, evoking a feeling of what it was like to live through this disaster. Following Franklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration, both the number of letters received by the White House and the percentage of them coming from the poor were unprecedented. The average number of daily communications jumped to between 5,000 and 8,000, a trend that continued throughout the Rosevelt administration. The White House staff for answering such letters--most of which were directed to FDR, Eleanor Roosevelt, or Harry Hopkins--quickly grew from one person to fifty. Mainly because of his radio talks, many felt they knew the president personally and could confide in him. They viewed the Roosevelts as parent figures, offering solace, help, and protection. Roosevelt himself valued the letters, perceiving them as a way to gauge public sentiment. The writers came from a number of different groups--middle-class people, blacks, rural residents, the elderly, and children. Their letters display emotional reactions to the Depression--despair, cynicism, and anger--and attitudes toward relief. In his extensive introduction, McElvaine sets the stage for the letters, discussing their significance and some of the themes that emerge from them. By preserving their original spelling, syntax, grammar, and capitalization, he conveys their full flavor. The Depression was far more than an economic collapse. It was the major personal event in the lives of tens of millions of Americans. McElvaine shows that, contrary to popular belief, many sufferers were not passive victims of history. Rather, he says, they were "also actors and, to an extent, playwrights, producers, and directors as well," taking an active role in trying to deal with their plight and solve their problems. For this twenty-fifth anniversary edition, McElvaine provides a new foreword recounting the history of the book, its impact on the historiography of the Depression, and its continued importance today.


Author : Jim Powell
Publisher : Crown
Release : 2007-12-18
Page : 352
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 030742071X
Description :


The Great Depression and the New Deal. For generations, the collective American consciousness has believed that the former ruined the country and the latter saved it. Endless praise has been heaped upon President Franklin Delano Roosevelt for masterfully reining in the Depression’s destructive effects and propping up the country on his New Deal platform. In fact, FDR has achieved mythical status in American history and is considered to be, along with Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln, one of the greatest presidents of all time. But would the Great Depression have been so catastrophic had the New Deal never been implemented? In FDR’s Folly, historian Jim Powell argues that it was in fact the New Deal itself, with its shortsighted programs, that deepened the Great Depression, swelled the federal government, and prevented the country from turning around quickly. You’ll discover in alarming detail how FDR’s federal programs hurt America more than helped it, with effects we still feel today, including: • How Social Security actually increased unemployment • How higher taxes undermined good businesses • How new labor laws threw people out of work • And much more This groundbreaking book pulls back the shroud of awe and the cloak of time enveloping FDR to prove convincingly how flawed his economic policies actually were, despite his good intentions and the astounding intellect of his circle of advisers. In today’s turbulent domestic and global environment, eerily similar to that of the 1930s, it’s more important than ever before to uncover and understand the truth of our history, lest we be doomed to repeat it.


Author : Isabel Sawhill
Publisher : Yale University Press
Release : 2018-01-01
Page : 255
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 0300230362
Description :


A sobering account of a disenfranchised American working class and important policy solutions to the nation's economic inequalities One of the country's leading scholars on economics and social policy, Isabel Sawhill addresses the enormous divisions in American society--economic, cultural, and political--and what might be done to bridge them. Widening inequality and the loss of jobs to trade and technology has left a significant portion of the American workforce disenfranchised and skeptical of governments and corporations alike. And yet both have a role to play in improving the country for all. Sawhill argues for a policy agenda based on mainstream values, such as family, education, and work. Although many have lost faith in government programs designed to help them, there are still trusted institutions on both the local and the federal level that can deliver better job opportunities and higher wages to those who have been left behind. At the same time, the private sector needs to reexamine how it trains and rewards employees. This book provides a clear-headed and middle-way path to a better-functioning society in which personal responsibility is honored and inclusive capitalism and more broadly shared growth are once more the norm.


Author : James Grant
Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
Release : 2019-07-23
Page : 368
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 0393609200
Description :


The definitive biography of one of the most brilliant and influential financial minds—banker, essayist, and editor of the Economist. During the upheavals of 2007–09, the chairman of the Federal Reserve had the name of a Victorian icon on the tip of his tongue: Walter Bagehot. Banker, man of letters, inventor of the Treasury bill, and author of Lombard Street, the still-canonical guide to stopping a run on the banks, Bagehot prescribed the doctrines that—decades later—inspired the radical responses to the world’s worst financial crises. Born in the small market town of Langport, just after the Panic of 1825 swept across England, Bagehot followed in his father’s footsteps and took a position at the local family bank—but his influence on financial matters would soon spread far beyond the county of Somerset. Persuasive and precocious, he came to hold sway in political circles, making high-profile friends, including William Gladstone—and enemies, such as Lord Overstone and Benjamin Disraeli. As a prolific essayist on wide-ranging topics, Bagehot won the admiration of Matthew Arnold and Woodrow Wilson, and delighted in paradox. He was also a misogynist, and while he opposed slavery, he misjudged Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. As editor of the Economist, he offered astute commentary on the financial issues of his day, and his name lives on in an eponymous weekly column. He has been called "the Greatest Victorian." In James Grant’s colorful and groundbreaking biography, Bagehot appears as both an ornament to his own age and a muse to our own. Drawing on a wealth of historical documents, correspondence, and publications, Grant paints a vivid portrait of the banker and his world.


Author : Charles P. Kindleberger
Ford International Professor of Economics Charles P Kindleberger
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 1986-04-17
Page : 355
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 9780520055926
Description :


“The World in Depression is the best book on the subject, and the subject, in turn, is the economically decisive decade of the century so far.”—John Kenneth Galbraith


Author : Angus Burgin
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release : 2012-10-30
Page : 280
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0674067436
Description :


Just as economists struggle today to justify the free market after the global economic crisis, an earlier generation revisited their worldview after the Great Depression. In this intellectual history of that project, Burgin traces the evolution of postwar economic thought in order to reconsider the most basic assumptions of a market-centered world.


Author : John O'Shea
Publisher :
Release : 2021-10-05
Page : 208
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781633573505
Description :


The things mom and dad experienced during the 'Great Depression' shaped the rest of their lives. They lived according to economic rules that they fashioned for themselves based on their Depression-era experiences...Don't buy anything on time. Pay cash! That was my mother's rule.


Author : Thomas Francis McManus
Richard Ward Nelson
Publisher : Ludwig von Mises Institute
Release : 1937
Page : 274
Category : Banks and banking
ISBN 13 : 1610162684
Description :



Author : Doug West
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release : 2016-03-01
Page : 64
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781530576289
Description :


There are many theories about what caused the Great Depression, and the truth is that there is no simple answer. Rather, a perfect storm of events came together and changed the lives of millions of people. One of the first signs of this dark period was the stock market crash in October 1929. In the aftermath, the country fell into the Great Depression, the longest and most significant economic depression since the Civil War. Through most of the 1920s, the United States economy was growing, and the stock market had reached new highs. People were making money in the stock market and having a grand time, so much so that few noticed the dark clouds forming on the horizon. By the end of the decade, industrial production had begun to decline, while unemployment was steadily rising. Stock market prices were plummeting from their peak in September 1929, and sales reached a crescendo in late October. On October 29, over sixteen million shares were traded in just one day. Billions of dollars were lost, with thousands of investors wiped out, and stock tickers were running hours behind because they were simply unequipped to manage this unprecedented amount of trading. The crash was not the only cause of the Great Depression, but it was certainly a symptom of a larger set of problems. Earlier in 1929, Herbert Hoover won the presidency under a wealth and prosperity platform. He made several unsuccessful attempts to prevent the economy from weakening during his administration. Despite his best efforts, banks continued to fail, and more Americans entered the ranks of unemployment. No one understood the extent of this economic downturn. But the election of 1932 brought Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt into the White House by a landslide. Roosevelt wasted no time, proposing extensive legislation called the New Deal to create new jobs, revitalize the banks, and give hope to the American people. Some of the New Deal programs were successful, while other fell short; but by the end of the 1930s, things had finally begun to improve. However, it would take the massive spending required during World War II for the economy to return to where it was a decade before. Read about this tumultuous period in American history by purchasing the book The Great Depression - A Short History. 30-Minute Book Series Welcome to the eleventh book in the 30-Minute Book Series. Books in this series are fast-paced, accurate, and cover the story in as much detail as a short book possibly can. You can complete each work in less than an hour, which makes our books a perfect companion for your lunch hour or your commute home from work. About the Author Doug West is a retired engineer, small business owner, and an experienced non-fiction writer with several books to his credit. His writing interests are general, with special expertise in science, biographies, and "How To" topics. Doug has a Ph.D. in General Engineering from Oklahoma State University


Author : Thomas E. Woods, Jr.
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release : 2009-02-09
Page : 194
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1596981067
Description :


With a foreword from Ron Paul, Meltdown is the free-market answer to the Fed-created economic crisis. As the new Obama administration inevitably calls for more regulations, Woods argues that the only way to rebuild our economy is by returning to the fundamentals of capitalism and letting the free market work.


Author : Marc Favreau
Publisher : Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Release : 2018-04-10
Page : 240
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN 13 : 031654583X
Description :


The incredible true story of how Americans from all walks of life weathered one of the most turbulent periods in our nation's history--the Great Depression--and emerged triumphant. Crash tells the story of the Great Depression, from the sweeping fallout of the market collapse to the more personal stories of those caught up in the aftermath. Packed with photographs, primary documents, and firsthand accounts, Crash shines a spotlight on pivotal moments and figures across ethnic, gender, racial, social, and geographic divides, reflecting many different experiences of one of the most turbulent decades in American history. Marc Favreau's meticulous research, vivid prose, and extensive back matter paints a thorough picture of how the country we live in today was built in response to the widespread poverty, insecurity, and fear of the 1930s.


Author : James L. Grant
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release : 1997-02-05
Page : 365
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9780471170754
Description :


This biography of Bernard Baruch considered to be renowned as the definitive story about the notorious financial wizard and presidential advisor. Baruch's political policies are discussed briefly, and James Grant includes a detailed account of Baruch's trading and investment gains and losses.


Author : David Stout
Publisher : Sourcebooks, Inc.
Release : 2020-04-07
Page : 464
Category : True Crime
ISBN 13 : 1492694800
Description :


"A thrilling account that puts the 1932 Lindbergh baby kidnapping case, billed as "the crime of the century," in the context of the thousands of other kidnappings that occurred in the U.S. during the Prohibition and Depression eras...will enthrall true crime fans."—Publishers Weekly, STARRED review The Great Depression was a time of desperation in America—parents struggled to feed their children and unemployment was at a record high. Adding to the lawlessness of the decade, thugs with submachine guns and corrupt law-enforcement officers ran rampant. But amidst this panic, there was one sure-fire way to make money, one used by criminals and resourceful civilians alike: kidnapping. Jump into this forgotten history with Edgar Award-winning author David Stout as he explores the reports of missing people that inundated newspapers at the time. Learn the horrifying details of these abduction cases, from the methods used and the investigative processes to the personal histories of the culprits and victims. All of this culminates with the most infamous kidnapping in American history, the one that targeted an international celebrity and changed legislation forever: the Lindbergh kidnapping. The Kidnap Years is a gritty, visceral, thoughtfully reported page-turner that chronicles the sweep of abductions that afflicted all corners of the country as desperate people were pushed to do the unthinkable. Fans of The Postman Always Rings Twice and other 30s and 40s American Noir crime novels will be fascinated by the true crime of the times. "A fascinating crime book like no other."—David Cay Johnston, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist If you like historical nonfiction like these, you'll love The Kidnap Years: Devil in the White City by Erik Larson The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson Lost City of Z by David Grann Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann


Author : Barry Eichengreen
Publisher : Oxford University Press, USA
Release : 2014-12-20
Page : 520
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 0199392005
Description :


"A brilliantly conceived dual-track account of the two greatest economic crises of the last century and their consequences"--


Author : Genevieve Graham
Publisher : Simon & Schuster
Release : 2020-03-03
Page : 384
Category : Fiction
ISBN 13 : 198212895X
Description :


The Home for Unwanted Girls meets Orphan Train in this unforgettable novel about a young girl caught in a scheme to rid England’s streets of destitute children, and the lengths she will go to find her way home—based on the true story of the British Home Children. 2018 At ninety-seven years old, Winnifred Ellis knows she doesn’t have much time left, and it is almost a relief to realize that once she is gone, the truth about her shameful past will die with her. But when her great-grandson Jamie, the spitting image of her dear late husband, asks about his family tree, Winnifred can’t lie any longer, even if it means breaking a promise she made so long ago... 1936 Fifteen-year-old Winny has never known a real home. After running away from an abusive stepfather, she falls in with Mary, Jack, and their ragtag group of friends roaming the streets of Liverpool. When the children are caught stealing food, Winny and Mary are left in Dr. Barnardo’s Barkingside Home for Girls, a local home for orphans and forgotten children found in the city’s slums. At Barkingside, Winny learns she will soon join other boys and girls in a faraway place called Canada, where families and better lives await them. But Winny’s hopes are dashed when she is separated from her friends and sent to live with a family that has no use for another daughter. Instead, they have paid for an indentured servant to work on their farm. Faced with this harsh new reality, Winny clings to the belief that she will someday find her friends again. Inspired by true events, The Forgotten Home Child is a moving and heartbreaking novel about place, belonging, and family—the one we make for ourselves and its enduring power to draw us home.


Author : Sarah Stage
Virginia B. Vincenti
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release : 2018-07-05
Page : 368
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1501729942
Description :


Until recently, historians tended to dismiss home economics as little more than a conspiracy to keep women in the kitchen. This landmark volume initiates collaboration among home economists, family and consumer science professionals, and women's historians. What knits the essays together is a willingness to revisit the subject of home economics with neither indictment nor apology. The volume includes significant new work that places home economics in the twentieth century within the context of the development of women's professions. Rethinking Home Economics documents the evolution of a profession from the home economics movement launched by Ellen Richards in the early twentieth century to the modern field renamed Family and Consumer Sciences in 1994. The essays in this volume show the range of activities pursued under the rubric of home economics, from dietetics and parenting, teaching and cooperative extension work, to test kitchen and product development. Exploration of the ways in which gender, race, and class influenced women's options in colleges and universities, hospitals, business, and industry, as well as government has provided a greater understanding of the obstacles women encountered and the strategies they used to gain legitimacy as the field developed.