The Life Of John Andr Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : John Andre
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release : 2016-07-03
Page : 74
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781495219177
Description :


John Andre (1750 - 1780) was a British Army officer hanged as a spy by the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War for assisting Benedict Arnold's attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York to the British. According to Tallmadge's account of the events, he and Andre conversed during the latter's captivity and transport. Andre wanted to know how he would be treated by Washington. Tallmadge, who had been a classmate of Nathan Hale while both were at Yale, described the capture of Hale. When Andre asked whether Tallmadge thought the situations similar, he replied "Yes, precisely similar, and similar shall be your fate"-a reference to Hale's hanging as a spy by the British. In 1779, Andre became Adjutant General of the British Army in America with the rank of major. In April of that year, he took charge of British secret intelligence. By the next year (1780), he had begun to plot with American General Benedict Arnold. The story of Andre is one of those episodes of history which are most widely known and longest remembered. There is a pleasant tinge of romance about the man himself, for he was young, handsome, and possessed of many accomplishments, clever, agreeable, popular and the hero of a love-affair which has crept into a corner of English literature with enough sentiment and controversy attached to it to interest curiosity, and perhaps to touch the heart of succeeding generations. About this youthful and gallant figure gather suddenly the inexorable conditions which shut him in as relentlessly as the hand of Fate leads Orestes or Hippolytus or (Edipus to the doom which has awaited them since the beginning of years. The favorite of his commanders, a trusted staffofficer, advancing easily along the road of promotion, beloved among his fellows, popular in Society, he passes suddenly out of the sunshine of a young prosperity into the darkness of a desperate enterprise, becomes the paymaster of treason, a disguised fugitive, a prisoner, a convicted spy, and dies at last by the hangman's hands. The contrast between his life filled with a soldier's work and relieved by idle hours of music and flowers, of pageants and verse-making, and his miserable end, is hardly sharper than that which separates the grim gallows by the Hudson from the monument to his memory in Westminster Abbey. Romance, desperate adventure, and dark tragedy are all there in the story of Andre. Andre was portrayed by Michael Wilding as an eloquent and dignified idealist in the 1955 Hollywood film The Scarlet Coat. He is portrayed by JJ Feild in the TV series Turn: Washington's Spies."


Author : Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release : 2016-07-22
Page : 58
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781535396882
Description :


*Includes pictures*Includes contemporary accounts about André's career and execution*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading*Includes a table of contents"I pray you to bear me witness that I meet my fate like a brave man." - AndréSpying and treachery are as much a part of warfare as weapons and death. This has always been the case since the earliest battles and is not likely to change in the future. And yet, even within this irregular system, there are certain rules, especially in past eras such as the American Revolution. First, while spying on behalf of one's country is perfectly respectable, betraying one's nation is treason. Second, honorable men do not involve those too innocent to understand the consequences of their actions in their schemes. Third, no man wearing his own uniform can be considered a spy, for his garments make it clear who he is and preclude deception. All three of these rules played into the story of the machinations and death of Major John André. No one who knew André personally would ever have dreamed he would one day hang. He was raised by devoutly religious parents and was a loyal Englishman and solid officer in His Majesty's army. He had, it was rumored, an unfortunate romantic liaison that ended with a cancelled engagement, and during the early days of the American Revolutionary War, he had served his king in Canada before being captured and held as a prisoner of war. Once he was returned to his command, he was promoted in recognition of his strength of character under duress. His reputation was so sterling, in fact, that he was given a very sensitive role, that of gathering intelligence for the British Army as they tried to put down the rebellious American colonies. This assignment, and an alleged relationship to a beautiful young Loyalist in Philadelphia named Peggy Shippen, would lead him to one of the colonists' biggest war heroes, Benedict Arnold. Arnold had arguably been more instrumental for the colonies' successes from 1775-1778 than anyone else, even perhaps George Washington, but a confluence of events left him willing to betray the cause he had fought and bled so hard for after he became military commander of Philadelphia. In one of the most controversial and scrutinized episodes of the war, Arnold married Peggy Shippen despite her Loyalist sympathies, and while Arnold was willing to break the first rule, André broke the second rule by using Shippen to pass messages, possibly even playing on her own affections for him. Ultimately, it was in breaking the third rule of espionage that André made his fatal mistake, for when he met near West Point to facilitate Arnold's betrayal, he changed his clothes one fateful night in September 1780, he changed his destiny and earned a place in the history books at the cost of his life. He was tried and convicted of being a spy, and he was sentenced to hang by men who had more respect for him than they did for their turncoat countryman. In the end, they agreed with Washington himself, who insisted that he was "more unfortunate than criminal."Major John André: The Life and Death of the Famous British Spymaster during the Revolutionary War profiles the influential part the dashing British spymaster played in the Revolution. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about André like never before, in no time at all.


Author : Jack Edward Shay
Publisher : Xlibris Corporation
Release : 1999-11-12
Page : 567
Category : Fiction
ISBN 13 : 9781465326003
Description :


The Dock of Broken Dreams is the story of the tragic intermingling of the lives of Peggy Shippen, Peggy Chew, John Andr, and Benedict Arnold set amidst the background of the Revolutionary War. Though cast in the form of a novel, it results from more than a decade of careful research.


Author : Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release : 2016-10-26
Page : 108
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781539748854
Description :


*Includes pictures*Includes quotes by both men about the war*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further readingFor over 230 years, American schoolchildren have been taught about the story of Nathan Hale, or at least a legend of it, and in the process the myth of Hale and his possibly apocryphal final words have immortalized the young man as America's most famous spy, despite his failed mission.After the siege of Boston forced the British to evacuate that city in March 1776, Continental Army commander George Washington suspected that the British would move by sea to New York City, the next logical target in an attempt to end a colonial insurrection. He thus rushed his army south to defend the city, but Washington's army would ultimately be pushed west all the way through New Jersey the rest of the year. However, shortly before the colonists had to leave New York, Washington tried to implement intelligence operations around New York City, and one of the early spies was young Nathan Hale. A young officer in the Continental Army from Connecticut, Hale was asked by Washington to go behind British lines on Long Island and bring back information on what the British were up to there. Unfortunately, Hale was quickly identified by Loyalists, found with incriminating papers on his body, and executed the morning after he was caught. The 21 year old Hale's name may have very well been lost to history but for propaganda efforts to make him a martyr to the cause, most notably the reports of his last words about regretting that he had but one life to lose for his country. If Hale said anything like the quote he's best known for, he was likely reciting an exchange in the play Cato by Joseph Addison or playing off of it, but regardless of what he actually said, the story and the legend of Hale aimed to cover up the fact that his mission was an abject failure, due both to bad luck and ineptitude. No one who knew John Andr� personally would ever have dreamed he would one day hang. He was raised by devoutly religious parents and was a loyal Englishman and solid officer in His Majesty's army. He had, it was rumored, an unfortunate romantic liaison that ended with a cancelled engagement, and during the early days of the American Revolutionary War, he had served his king in Canada before being captured and held as a prisoner of war. Once he was returned to his command, he was promoted in recognition of his strength of character under duress. His reputation was so sterling, in fact, that he was given a very sensitive role, that of gathering intelligence for the British Army as they tried to put down the rebellious American colonies. This assignment, and an alleged relationship to a beautiful young Loyalist in Philadelphia named Peggy Shippen, would lead him to one of the colonists' biggest war heroes, Benedict Arnold. Arnold had arguably been more instrumental for the colonies' successes from 1775-1778 than anyone else, even perhaps George Washington, but a confluence of events left him willing to betray the cause he had fought and bled so hard for after he became military commander of Philadelphia. In one of the most controversial and scrutinized episodes of the war, Arnold married Peggy Shippen despite her Loyalist sympathies, and while Arnold was willing to break the first rule, Andr� broke the second rule by using Shippen to pass messages, possibly even playing on her own affections for him. Ultimately, it was in breaking the third rule of espionage that Andr� made his fatal mistake, for when he met near West Point to facilitate Arnold's betrayal, he changed his clothes one fateful night in September 1780, he changed his destiny and earned a place in the history books at the cost of his life. He was tried and convicted of being a spy, and he was sentenced to hang by men who had more respect for him than they did for their turncoat countryman.


Author : Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release : 2018-01-11
Page : 194
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781983754982
Description :


*Includes pictures*Includes quotes by both men about the war*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further readingFor over 230 years, American schoolchildren have been taught about the story of Nathan Hale, or at least a legend of it, and in the process the myth of Hale and his possibly apocryphal final words have immortalized the young man as America's most famous spy, despite his failed mission.After the siege of Boston forced the British to evacuate that city in March 1776, Continental Army commander George Washington suspected that the British would move by sea to New York City, the next logical target in an attempt to end a colonial insurrection. He thus rushed his army south to defend the city, but Washington's army would ultimately be pushed west all the way through New Jersey the rest of the year. However, shortly before the colonists had to leave New York, Washington tried to implement intelligence operations around New York City, and one of the early spies was young Nathan Hale. A young officer in the Continental Army from Connecticut, Hale was asked by Washington to go behind British lines on Long Island and bring back information on what the British were up to there. Unfortunately, Hale was quickly identified by Loyalists, found with incriminating papers on his body, and executed the morning after he was caught. The 21 year old Hale's name may have very well been lost to history but for propaganda efforts to make him a martyr to the cause, most notably the reports of his last words about regretting that he had but one life to lose for his country. If Hale said anything like the quote he's best known for, he was likely reciting an exchange in the play Cato by Joseph Addison or playing off of it, but regardless of what he actually said, the story and the legend of Hale aimed to cover up the fact that his mission was an abject failure, due both to bad luck and ineptitude. No one who knew John Andr� personally would ever have dreamed he would one day hang. He was raised by devoutly religious parents and was a loyal Englishman and solid officer in His Majesty's army. He had, it was rumored, an unfortunate romantic liaison that ended with a cancelled engagement, and during the early days of the American Revolutionary War, he had served his king in Canada before being captured and held as a prisoner of war. Once he was returned to his command, he was promoted in recognition of his strength of character under duress. His reputation was so sterling, in fact, that he was given a very sensitive role, that of gathering intelligence for the British Army as they tried to put down the rebellious American colonies. This assignment, and an alleged relationship to a beautiful young Loyalist in Philadelphia named Peggy Shippen, would lead him to one of the colonists' biggest war heroes, Benedict Arnold. Arnold had arguably been more instrumental for the colonies' successes from 1775-1778 than anyone else, even perhaps George Washington, but a confluence of events left him willing to betray the cause he had fought and bled so hard for after he became military commander of Philadelphia. In one of the most controversial and scrutinized episodes of the war, Arnold married Peggy Shippen despite her Loyalist sympathies, and while Arnold was willing to break the first rule, Andr� broke the second rule by using Shippen to pass messages, possibly even playing on her own affections for him. Ultimately, it was in breaking the third rule of espionage that Andr� made his fatal mistake, for when he met near West Point to facilitate Arnold's betrayal, he changed his clothes one fateful night in September 1780, he changed his destiny and earned a place in the history books at the cost of his life. He was tried and convicted of being a spy, and he was sentenced to hang by men who had more respect for him than they did for their turncoat countryman.


Author : D. A. B. Ronald
Publisher : Casemate Publishers
Release : 2019-01-19
Page : 304
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1612005225
Description :


John André was head of the British Army’s Secret Service in North America as the Revolutionary War entered its most bitter and, ultimately, decisive phase. In 1780, he masterminded the defection of a high-ranking American officer—General Benedict Arnold. Arnold—his name for ever synonymous with treason in American folklore—had recently been appointed commander of West Point and agreed, through André, to turn over to the British this strategically vital fort on the upper reaches of the Hudson River. Control of the fort would interrupt lines of communication between New England and the southern colonies, seriously impeding military operations against the British. The plan was also to simultaneously kidnap General George Washington, Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. By these two masterstrokes, the British believed they could end rebel resistance. The secret negotiations between Arnold and André were protracted and fraught with danger. Arnold’s new wife, Peggy became the go-between in the negotiations. Arnold insisted that, to complete negotiations, he and André must meet face to face. At the dead of night on September 21st 1780 the two rendezvoused in no-man’s-land. Sir Henry Clinton, commander of British forces in North America and André’s immediate superior, agreed to this meeting but with three strict conditions: that André not go within the American lines; that he remain in uniform; and that he carry away from the meeting no incriminating papers. Thus, if caught, André could not be treated as a spy. Yet, when André was captured forty-eight hours later, he was within American lines, had changed into civilian clothes and was carrying maps of West Point hidden in his boots. The Americans had no option other than to treat him as a spy, especially when he himself admitted this. He was convicted by military tribunal and hanged—his death lamented both in America and England. While biographers agree on the facts of this tragic episode, they disagree on André’s motives and why he chose to sacrifice himself. This new biography of André puts forward a new answer to this mystery—not only why he acted as he did, but how he wished others to see his actions.


Author : Winthrop Sargent
Publisher : Sagwan Press
Release : 2018-02-04
Page : 516
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9781376699210
Description :


This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


Author : Alexander Hamilton
Publisher :
Release : 2016-07-08
Page : 28
Category :
ISBN 13 : 9781535154321
Description :


John André (1750 - 1780) was a British Army officer hanged as a spy by the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War for assisting Benedict Arnold's attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York to the British.The character and the last moments of Andre are well depicted by Colonel Hamilton, aide-de-camp to Washington, in a letter to John Laurens, and is considered one of Hamilton's best known productions. Of Hamilton's numerous historical sketches, the most celebrated is this letter to Colonel Laurens giving an account of the fate of Major André, in which refinement of feeling and inflexible impartiality of view are alike conspicuous.Hamilton was with Washington when he was first apprized of the flight of that traitor Benedict Arnold and the arrest of Andre. In reference to the fall of the British officer who was thus involved in the punishment which Arnold deserved, Hamilton, moved by a generous sympathy for the fate of one so young, so chivalrous, and so promising, exerted his utmost efforts to discover some legal and honorable expedient to save him. When all proved unavailing, he felt deeply for the unfortunate officer, and published a narrative of the facts in the case, in a letter to his friend Laurens, which reflects equal credit, both upon his intellect and his heart. It was a model of elegance, clearness, simplicity and force in the art of narration.The fate of Major Andre made a profound sensation in England, though as little as possible was said about it publicly. The King made such poor amends as he could; he conferred a baronetcy on Andre's brother, and erected a monument to him in Westminster Abbey, with an inscription in which the nature of the service in which Andre perished, and the fate which befell him, are alike concealed beneath a decent veil of words. It was many a long year before the question of whether or no he came under the description of a spy could be approached with even the appearance of calmness, and many more before his death ceased to be called "the only blot on Washington's fame." His enemies had wept for him; his friends might be excused if they found it hard to be just. Many of us have stood before his monument in the Abbey. As one stands there and thinks of Andre's story, those great words, Duty, Glory, and Honour, take a more solemn meaning, and treachery and infidelity are seen in all their hideous nakedness. It is said that Benedict Arnold was once seen standing there.Hamilton was against the harsh decision, and it is well known that a majority of these officers themselves, catching the wide-spread sympathy of the hour, were inclined to revoke the sentence, had it not been for the counter and too ascendant influence of Greene and Lafayette.


Author : D. B. Read
Publisher :
Release : 2015-07-13
Page : 336
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9781331339830
Description :


Excerpt from The Life and Times of Gen. John Graves Simcoe: Commander of the "Queen's Ranger's" During the Revolutionary War, and First Governor of Upper Canada, Together With Some Account of Major Andre and Capt. Brant To The People of Ontario: Fellow Subjects, - I dedicate this book, "The Life and Times of General Simcoe, the First Governor of Upper Canada," to you. You are the natural guardians of the fame of the distinguished officer to whom was committed the destinies of Upper Canada when first severed from the Province of Quebec. Governor Simcoe, like many of the early settlers of the Province, was actively engaged on the British side in the American Revolutionary War. It was fitting that he should be the first Governor of a province the majority of whose people were his compatriots. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works."


Author : John Evelyn
Publisher :
Release : 1819
Page :
Category : Great Britain
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : John Evangelist Walsh
Publisher : Palgrave Macmillan
Release : 2001
Page : 239
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9780312238896
Description :


A dramatic account of the career, capture, and execution of the most famous Revolutionary War spy focuses on Major John Andre, a gentleman agent and secret Loyalist who collaborated with Benedict Arnold to attack West Point.


Author : John Strype
Publisher :
Release : 1822
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : John Strype
Publisher :
Release : 1822
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Jan Krans
L.J. Lietaert Peerbolte
Publisher : BRILL
Release : 2013-02-15
Page : 326
Category : Religion
ISBN 13 : 9004250263
Description :


These studies in honour of Martinus C. de Boer offer important backgrounds and new insights by leading New Testament scholars on Paul, John, and Apocalyptic Eschatology.


Author : John Strype
Publisher :
Release : 1718
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : John Strype
Publisher :
Release : 1822
Page :
Category : England
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : John Strype
Publisher :
Release : 1822
Page :
Category : Clergy
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : John Strype
Publisher :
Release : 1822
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Adolph Frederick Alexander Woodford
Publisher :
Release : 1878
Page : 665
Category : Freemasonry
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Samuel Austin Allibone
Publisher :
Release : 1899
Page :
Category : American literature
ISBN 13 :
Description :