The Making Of Empire In Bronze Age Anatolia Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Claudia Glatz
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 2020-11-12
Page : 350
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1108491103
Description :


This book reconsiders the concept of empire and examines the processes of imperial making and undoing in Hittite Anatolia (c. 1600-1180 BCE).


Author : Theo van den Hout
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 2021-01-07
Page : 448
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1108494889
Description :


The first comprehensive overview of the development of literacy, script usage, and literature in Hittite Anatolia (1650-1200 BC).


Author : Sharon R. Steadman
Gregory McMahon
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2011-09-15
Page : 1174
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0195376145
Description :


This title provides comprehensive overviews on archaeological philological, linguistic, and historical issues at the forefront of Anatolian scholarship in the 21st century.


Author : Mogens Trolle Larsen
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 2015-09-17
Page :
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1316425444
Description :


The ancient Anatolian city of Kanesh (present-day Kültepe, Turkey) was a continuously inhabited site from the early Bronze Age through Roman times. The city flourished c.2000–1750 BCE as an Old Assyrian trade outpost and the earliest attested commercial society in world history. More than 23,000 elaborate clay tablets from private merchant houses provide a detailed description of a system of long-distance trade that reached from central Asia to the Black Sea region and the Aegean. The texts record common activities such as trade between Kanesh and the city state of Assur, and between Assyrian merchants and local people. The tablets tell us about the economy as well as the culture, language, religion, and private lives of individuals we can identify by name, occupation, and sometimes even personality. This book presents an in-depth account of this vibrant Bronze Age Anatolian society, revealing the daily lives of its inhabitants.


Author : Gregory E. Areshian
Publisher : ISD LLC
Release : 2013-12-31
Page : 272
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 193877051X
Description :


For more than four thousand years, empires have been geographically the largest polities on Earth, shaping in many respects the human past and present in different epochs and on different continents. Covering the time span from the second millennium B.C.E. to the sixteenth century C.E., and geographic areas from China to South America, the case studies included in this volume demonstrate the necessity to combine perspectives from the longue duree and global comparativism with the theory of agency and an understanding of specific contexts for human actions. Contributions from leading scholars examine salient aspects of the Hittite, Assyrian, Ancient Egyptian, Achaemenid and Sasanian Iranian, Zhou to Han Dynasty Chinese, Inka, and Mughal empires.


Author : Robert Drews
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2020-03-31
Page :
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0691209979
Description :


The Bronze Age came to a close early in the twelfth century b.c. with one of the worst calamities in history: over a period of several decades, destruction descended upon key cities throughout the Eastern Mediterranean, bringing to an end the Levantine, Hittite, Trojan, and Mycenaean kingdoms and plunging some lands into a dark age that would last more than four hundred years. In his attempt to account for this destruction, Robert Drews rejects the traditional explanations and proposes a military one instead.


Author : mŸr Harman?ah
Publisher : Oxbow Books
Release : 2014-07-11
Page : 270
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1782976744
Description :


People are drawn to places where geology performs its miracles: ice-cold spring waters gushing from the rock, mysterious caves which act as conduits for ancestors and divinities traveling back and forth to the underworld, sacred bodies of water where communities make libations and offer sacrifices. This volume presents a series of archaeological landscapes from the Iranian highlands to the Anatolian Plateau, and from the Mediterranean borderlands to Mesoamerica. Contributors all have a deep interest in the making and the long-term history of unorthodox places of human interaction with the mineral world, specifically the landscapes of rocks and water. Working with rock reliefs, sacred springs and lakes, caves, cairns, ruins and other meaningful places, they draw attention to the need for a rigorous field methodology and theoretical framework for working with such special places. At a time when network models, urban-centered and macro-scale perspectives dominate discussions of ancient landscapes, this unusual volume takes us to remote, unmappable places of cultural practice, social imagination and political appropriation. It offers not only a diverse set of case studies approaching small meaningful places in their special geological grounding, but also suggests new methodologies and interpretive approaches to understand places and the processes of place-making.


Author : Jack Goody
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 2012-11-15
Page : 366
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 110747065X
Description :


Metals, Culture and Capitalism is an ambitious, broad-ranging account of the search for metals in Europe and the Near East from the Bronze Age to the Industrial Revolution and the relationship between this and economic activity, socio-political structures and the development of capitalism. Continuing his criticism of Eurocentric traditions, a theme explored in The Theft of History (2007) and Renaissances (2009), Jack Goody takes the Bronze Age as a starting point for a balanced account of the East and the West, seeking commonalities that recent histories overlook. Considering the role of metals in relation to early cultures, the European Renaissance and 'modernity' in general, Goody explores how the search for metals entailed other forms of knowledge, as well as the arts, leading to changes that have defined Europe and the contemporary world. This landmark text, spanning centuries, cultures and continents, promises to inspire scholars and students across the social sciences.


Author : Philip L. Kohl
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release : 2007-01-22
Page :
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1139461990
Description :


This book provides an overview of Bronze Age societies of Western Eurasia through an investigation of the archaeological record. The Making of Bronze Age Eurasia outlines the long-term processes and patterns of interaction that link these groups together in a shared historical trajectory of development. Interactions took the form of the exchange of raw materials and finished goods, the spread and sharing of technologies, and the movements of peoples from one region to another. Kohl reconstructs economic activities from subsistence practices to the production and exchange of metals and other materials. Kohl also argues forcefully that the main task of the archaeologist should be to write culture-history on a spatially and temporally grand scale in an effort to detect large, macrohistorical processes of interaction and shared development.


Author : Stephanie Lynn Budin
Jean Macintosh Turfa
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2016-08-12
Page : 1074
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1317219902
Description :


This volume gathers brand new essays from some of the most respected scholars of ancient history, archaeology, and physical anthropology to create an engaging overview of the lives of women in antiquity. The book is divided into ten sections, nine focusing on a particular area, and also includes almost 200 images, maps, and charts. The sections cover Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia, Cyprus, the Levant, the Aegean, Italy, and Western Europe, and include many lesser-known cultures such as the Celts, Iberia, Carthage, the Black Sea region, and Scandinavia. Women's experiences are explored, from ordinary daily life to religious ritual and practice, to motherhood, childbirth, sex, and building a career. Forensic evidence is also treated for the actual bodies of ancient women. Women in Antiquity is edited by two experts in the field, and is an invaluable resource to students of the ancient world, gender studies, and women's roles throughout history.


Author : Altan Çilingiroğlu
Gareth Darbyshire
Publisher :
Release : 2005
Page : 240
Category : Iron age
ISBN 13 : 1912090570
Description :



Author : Fred Woudhuizen
Publisher : Archaeopress Publishing Ltd
Release : 2018-05-31
Page : 168
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1784918288
Description :


A study focussing on the Luwians of Western Anatolia, the geography of their habitat, and their neighbours and predecessors in the region. A reconstruction of western Luwian history and a sketch of their language is presented, based on linguistic data taken from hieroglyphic inscriptions and cuneiform script.


Author : Ömür Harmanşah
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2014-12-05
Page : 200
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1317575725
Description :


Place, Memory, and Healing: An Archaeology of Anatolian Rock Monuments investigates the complex and deep histories of places, how they served as sites of memory and belonging for local communities over the centuries, and how they were appropriated and monumentalized in the hands of the political elites. Focusing on Anatolian rock monuments carved into the living rock at watery landscapes during the Late Bronze and Early Iron Ages, this book develops an archaeology of place as a theory of cultural landscapes and as an engaged methodology of fieldwork in order to excavate the genealogies of places. Advocating that archaeology can contribute substantively to the study of places in many fields of research and engagement within the humanities and the social sciences, this book seeks to move beyond the oft-conceived notion of places as fixed and unchanging, and argues that places are always unfinished, emergent, and hybrid. Rock cut monuments of Anatolian antiquity are discussed in the historical and micro-regional context of their making at the time of the Hittite Empire and its aftermath, while the book also investigates how such rock-cut places, springs, and caves are associated with new forms of storytelling, holy figures, miracles, and healing in their post-antique life. Anybody wishing to understand places of cultural significance both archaeologically as well as through current theoretical lenses such as heritage studies, ethnography of landscapes, social memory, embodied and sensory experience of the world, post-colonialism, political ecology, cultural geography, sustainability, and globalization will find the case studies and research within this book a doorway to exploring places in new and rewarding ways.


Author : Aaron A. Burke
Publisher :
Release : 2021-01-27
Page : 432
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1108857000
Description :


In this book, Aaron A. Burke explores the evolution of Amorite identity in the Near East from ca. 2500-1500 BC. He sets the emergence of a collective identity for the Amorites, one of the most famous groups in Ancient Near Eastern history, against the backdrop of both Akkadian imperial intervention and declining environmental conditions during this period. Tracing the migration of Amorite refugees from agropastoral communities into nearby regions, he shows how mercenarism in both Mesopotamia and Egypt played a central role in the acquisition of economic and political power between 2100 and 1900 BC. Burke also examines how the establishment of Amorite kingdoms throughout the Near East relied on traditional means of legitimation, and how trade, warfare, and the exchange of personnel contributed to the establishment of an Amorite koiné. Offering a fresh approach to identity at different levels of social hierarchy over time and space, this volume contributes to broader questions related to identity for other ancient societies.


Author : H. Melchert
Publisher : BRILL
Release : 2003-03-10
Page : 441
Category : Reference
ISBN 13 : 9047402146
Description :


A state-of-the-art appraisal of the history, language, religion, and material culture of the Luwians, a people as important in Anatolia and Syria in the second and first millennia BCE as the better-known Hittites.


Author : Mark Weeden
Lee Z. Ullmann
Publisher : Handbook of Oriental Studies
Release : 2017
Page : 404
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9789004341746
Description :


Hittite Landscape and Geography provides a holistic geographical perspective on the study of the Late Bronze Age Hittite Civilization from Anatolia (Turkey) both as it is represented in Hittite texts and modern archaeology.


Author : K. Aslihan Yener
Tara Ingman
Publisher :
Release : 2020
Page : 489
Category : Alalakh (Extinct city)
ISBN 13 : 9789042938939
Description :


This volume, Alalakh and its Neighbours, represents the results of the symposium held in honour of the fifteenth anniversary of renewed excavations at Tell Atchana (Alalakh). It brings together results of ongoing interdisciplinary research projects conducted by the large and diverse Tell Atchana team with reflections on Alalakh's connections to its wider social and geographical setting as discussed in the contributions of scholars working at nearby sites in Anatolia, Syria, and the Aegean. The papers here look both inward towards resolving lingering questions from Sir Leonard Woolley's original excavations at the site, as well as new questions that have come up in the renewed excavations concerning life at Alalakh, and outward toward the city's place in a regional context. Covering chronological issues, textual evidence, scientific analyses, and a wide range of material culture (including especially ceramics, metals, stone, and glass), this volume encompasses the recent results of work at this important second millennium BC site.


Author : Emma L. Baysal
Leonidas Karakatsanis
Publisher : British Institute at Ankara Monograph
Release : 2017-06-29
Page : 224
Category : Turkey
ISBN 13 : 9781898249382
Description :


Building on similarities and exploring differences in the way scholars undertake their research, this volume presents crossdisciplinary communication on the study of borders, frontiers and boundaries through time, with a focus on Turkey. Standing at the dividing/connecting line between Europe and Asia, Turkey emerges as a place carrying a rich history of multiple layers of borders that have been drawn, shifted or unmade from the remote past until today: from Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers to the period of early states in the Bronze Age, from the poleis of classical antiquity to the period of the empires defined by the Roman expansion and Byzantine rule, from the imprints of the Ottoman state's expanded frontiers to contemporary Turkey's national borders. Amidst proliferating interdisciplinary collaborations for the study of borders between social anthropology, geography, political science and history, this book aims to contribute to a nascent but growing direction in border studies by including archaeology as a collocutor and using Turkey as a case study.


Author : Marwan Kilani
Publisher : BRILL
Release : 2019-10-07
Page : 340
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 9004416609
Description :


In Byblos in the Late Bronze Age, Marwan Kilani reconstructs the “biography” of the city of Byblos during the Late Bronze Age, exploring its interactions and development in relation with the contemporary local and macroregional cultural and geopolitical reality.


Author : Matthew Symonds
Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
Release : 2020-12-10
Page : 232
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1350105376
Description :


Over its venerable history, Hadrian's Wall has had an undeniable influence in shaping the British landscape, both literally and figuratively. Once thought to be a soft border, recent research has implicated it in the collapse of a farming civilisation centuries in the making, and in fuelling an insurgency characterised by violent upheaval. Examining the everyday impact of the Wall over the three centuries it was in operation, Matthew Symonds sheds new light on its underexplored human story by discussing how the evidence speaks of a hard border scything through a previously open landscape and bringing dramatic change in its wake. The Roman soldiers posted to Hadrian's Wall were overwhelmingly recruits from the empire's occupied territories, and for them the frontier could be a place of fear and magic where supernatural protection was invoked during spells of guard duty. Since antiquity, the Wall has been exploited by powers craving the legitimacy that came with being accepted as the heirs of Rome: it helped forge notions of English and Scottish nationhood, and even provided a model of selfless cultural collaboration when the British Empire needed reassurance. It has also inspired creatives for centuries, appearing in a more or less recognisable guise in works ranging from Rudyard Kipling's Puck of Pook's Hill to George R. R. Martin's A Game of Thrones. Combining an archaeological analysis of the monument itself and an examination of its rich legacy and contemporary relevance, this volume presents a reliable, modern perspective on the Wall.