The Power And Independence Of The Federal Reserve Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Peter Conti-Brown
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2017-10-03
Page : 360
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1400888417
Description :


The independence of the Federal Reserve is considered a cornerstone of its identity, crucial for keeping monetary policy decisions free of electoral politics. But do we really understand what is meant by "Federal Reserve independence"? Using scores of examples from the Fed's rich history, The Power and Independence of the Federal Reserve shows that much common wisdom about the nation's central bank is inaccurate. Legal scholar and financial historian Peter Conti-Brown provides an in-depth look at the Fed's place in government, its internal governance structure, and its relationships to such individuals and groups as the president, Congress, economists, and bankers. Exploring how the Fed regulates the global economy and handles its own internal politics, and how the law does—and does not—define the Fed's power, Conti-Brown captures and clarifies the central bank's defining complexities. He examines the foundations of the Federal Reserve Act of 1913, which established a system of central banks, and the ways that subsequent generations have redefined the organization. Challenging the notion that the Fed Chair controls the organization as an all-powerful technocrat, he explains how institutions and individuals—within and outside of government—shape Fed policy. Conti-Brown demonstrates that the evolving mission of the Fed—including systemic risk regulation, wider bank supervision, and as a guardian against inflation and deflation—requires a reevaluation of the very way the nation's central bank is structured. Investigating how the Fed influences and is influenced by ideologies, personalities, law, and history, The Power and Independence of the Federal Reserve offers a uniquely clear and timely picture of one of the most important institutions in the United States and the world.


Author : Sarah Binder
Mark Spindel
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2017-08-28
Page : 296
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1400888565
Description :


Born out of crisis a century ago, the Federal Reserve has become the most powerful macroeconomic policymaker and financial regulator in the world. The Myth of Independence traces the Fed’s transformation from a weak, secretive, and decentralized institution in 1913 to a remarkably transparent central bank a century later. Offering a unique account of Congress’s role in steering this evolution, Sarah Binder and Mark Spindel explore the Fed’s past, present, and future and challenge the myth of its independence. Binder and Spindel argue that recurring cycles of crisis, blame, and reform propelled lawmakers to create and revamp the powers and governance of the Fed at critical junctures, including the Panic of 1907, the Great Depression, the postwar Treasury-Fed Accord, the inflationary episode of the 1970s, and the recent financial crisis. Marshaling archival sources, interviews, and statistical analyses, the authors pinpoint political and economic dynamics that shaped interactions between the legislature and the Fed, and that have generated a far stronger central bank than anticipated at its founding. The Fed today retains its unique federal style, diluting the ability of lawmakers and the president to completely centralize control of monetary policy. In the long wake of the financial crisis, with economic prospects decidedly subpar, partisan rivals in Congress seem poised to continue battling over the Fed’s statutory mandates and the powers given to achieve them. Examining the interdependent relationship between America’s Congress and its central bank, The Myth of Independence presents critical insights about the future of monetary and fiscal policies that drive the nation’s economy.


Author : Ron Paul
Publisher : Grand Central Publishing
Release : 2009-09-16
Page : 224
Category : Political Science
ISBN 13 : 044656818X
Description :


A provocative and controversial treatise that argues we cannot actually fix the broken economy without discussing the 800-lb gorilla in the room: the Federal Reserve. Most people think of the Fed as an indispensable institution without which the country's economy could not properly function. But in End the Fed, Ron Paul draws on American history, economics, and fascinating stories from his own long political life to argue that the Fed is both corrupt and unconstitutional. It is inflating currency today at nearly a Weimar or Zimbabwe level, a practice that threatens to put us into an inflationary depression where $100 bills are worthless. What most people don't realize is that the Fed -- created by the Morgans and Rockefellers at a private club off the coast of Georgia -- is actually working against their own personal interests. Congressman Paul's urgent appeal to all citizens and officials tells us where we went wrong and what we need to do fix America's economic policy for future generations.


Author : Sarah A. Binder
Mark Spindel
Publisher :
Release : 2017
Page : 282
Category : Federal Reserve banks
ISBN 13 : 9780691163192
Description :


Monetary politics -- The blame game -- Creating the Federal Reserve -- Opening the act in the wake of the Depression -- Midcentury modern central banking -- The great inflation and the limits of independence -- The only game in town -- The myth of independence


Author : Roger Lowenstein
Publisher : Penguin
Release : 2015-10-20
Page : 368
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1101614129
Description :


A tour de force of historical reportage, America’s Bank illuminates the tumultuous era and remarkable personalities that spurred the unlikely birth of America’s modern central bank, the Federal Reserve. Today, the Fed is the bedrock of the financial landscape, yet the fight to create it was so protracted and divisive that it seems a small miracle that it was ever established. For nearly a century, America, alone among developed nations, refused to consider any central or organizing agency in its financial system. Americans’ mistrust of big government and of big banks—a legacy of the country’s Jeffersonian, small-government traditions—was so widespread that modernizing reform was deemed impossible. Each bank was left to stand on its own, with no central reserve or lender of last resort. The real-world consequences of this chaotic and provincial system were frequent financial panics, bank runs, money shortages, and depressions. By the first decade of the twentieth century, it had become plain that the outmoded banking system was ill equipped to finance America’s burgeoning industry. But political will for reform was lacking. It took an economic meltdown, a high-level tour of Europe, and—improbably—a conspiratorial effort by vilified captains of Wall Street to overcome popular resistance. Finally, in 1913, Congress conceived a federalist and quintessentially American solution to the conflict that had divided bankers, farmers, populists, and ordinary Americans, and enacted the landmark Federal Reserve Act. Roger Lowenstein—acclaimed financial journalist and bestselling author of When Genius Failed and The End of Wall Street—tells the drama-laden story of how America created the Federal Reserve, thereby taking its first steps onto the world stage as a global financial power. America’s Bank showcases Lowenstein at his very finest: illuminating complex financial and political issues with striking clarity, infusing the debates of our past with all the gripping immediacy of today, and painting unforgettable portraits of Gilded Age bankers, presidents, and politicians. Lowenstein focuses on the four men at the heart of the struggle to create the Federal Reserve. These were Paul Warburg, a refined, German-born financier, recently relocated to New York, who was horrified by the primitive condition of America’s finances; Rhode Island’s Nelson W. Aldrich, the reigning power broker in the U.S. Senate and an archetypal Gilded Age legislator; Carter Glass, the ambitious, if then little-known, Virginia congressman who chaired the House Banking Committee at a crucial moment of political transition; and President Woodrow Wilson, the academician-turned-progressive-politician who forced Glass to reconcile his deep-seated differences with bankers and accept the principle (anathema to southern Democrats) of federal control. Weaving together a raucous era in American politics with a storied financial crisis and intrigue at the highest levels of Washington and Wall Street, Lowenstein brings the beginnings of one of the country’s most crucial institutions to vivid and unforgettable life. Readers of this gripping historical narrative will wonder whether they’re reading about one hundred years ago or the still-seething conflicts that mark our discussions of banking and politics today.


Author : S. H. Axilrod
Publisher : Oxford University Press on Demand
Release : 2013-06-06
Page : 141
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 0199934487
Description :


Discusses the legal basis for the Federal Reserve and the powers the institution can carry out, highlights key events in U.S. postwar financial history, and explains how monetary policy is tied to the political and social scenes.


Author : A. Jerome Clifford
Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
Release : 2016-11-11
Page : 436
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1512801348
Description :


The Federal Reserve Act became law on December 23, 1913. The need for the new monetary system for which this law provided was traceable to the frequently stated causal connection between crises and failure in the banking and currency system and crises and failure in commerce, industry, and agriculture. The supporters of the law argued that the continued prosperity and growth of the nation demanded that monetary malfunctions be cured. The powers and responsibilities given to the new system were enveloped in structural arrangements designed to assure the organization itself as well as the nation that there would be competent, adequate, and independent authority to provide for a more efficient monetary system. Although unique, the solution was not simple in either structure or operation, for besides protecting itself from the dangers of government or private ­banker domination, the Federal Reserve System had to win and keep the help and cooperation of this same government and these same private banks. The System maintained its independence in two ways. First, the Federal Reserve System found its fundamental meaning in the "governmental" function delegated to it by Congress—the formation and execution of credit and monetary policy for public purposes. Yet it was set apart from the ordinary legislative and executive departments of the government. Second, the System worked to achieve its purposes by acting through and with the cooperation of the nation's private financial interests. Yet it was separate from those interests. The Federal Reserve System was designed to cooperate and still be independent. How it promoted this harmony, and yet avoided domination was its glory and its cross. It is of the history of this achievement that this book tells.


Author : United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Banking and Currency
Publisher :
Release : 1935
Page : 1022
Category : Banking act of 1935
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Nicolas Thompson
Publisher : SUNY Press
Release : 2021-04-01
Page : 338
Category : Political Science
ISBN 13 : 1438482604
Description :


Traces the six-decade struggle for power within the Federal Reserve System from the perspective of the central bankers who shaped the Fed. Imagining the Fed traces a six-decade struggle to shape the Federal Reserve’s policymaking organs, the Washington-based Board and the Federal Open Market Committee. Conventional wisdom holds that Congress ended the system’s struggle in 1935 by granting the Board a voting majority on the open market committee, establishing its Fed primacy. Yet, this book shows that the Fed’s struggle continued flaring to yield consequential changes until 1970, when the modern Fed emerged. Nicolas Thompson explores how the Fed’s evolution from a weak and fragmented sprawl into the world’s most powerful central bank paralleled broader changes in the American polity. The rise and fall of hegemonic political parties remade the Board and elevated its Fed position, while the wars of the twentieth century concentrated Fed power in New York. When peace returned, however, system agents inherited a central bank that veered from the law, inviting renewed struggle. This process continued into the 1960s, when an ascendant Democratic Party loaded the Board with economists, who remade it in their image. Later partisan choices to launch unfunded wars at home and abroad unleashed inflationary forces which severed the dollar’s link to gold. Freed from its golden fetters, monetary policy emerged as a domestic policy realm and Fed power durably concentrated in a new Board technocracy. Nicolas Thompson is Assistant Professor of Politics at the University of South Florida.


Author : Onno de Beaufort Wijnholds
Publisher : Springer Nature
Release : 2020-07-23
Page : 305
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 3030400417
Description :


Central banks are major players in today’s economic and financial policy-making. While respected for their technical acumen and their pivotal role in defusing the global financial crisis, they are at the same time mistrusted by others and considered to be too powerful. In order to contribute to a better understanding of the why, what and how of central banking, this book traces the progress of central banks from modest beginnings, including financing wars, to the powerful institutions they have become. It describes the evolution of the Bank of England to a fully-fledged central bank, the very different route taken by the Federal Reserve and, much later, by the European Central Bank. The gold standard, floating exchange rates, and the battle against inflation are covered in depth, alongside a review of modern monetary policy and central banks’ role in maintaining financial stability. Throughout the book, the ups and downs of central banks’ relationship vis-a-vis their governments are a recurring theme, even surmising that reigning in the independence of central banks risks inflicting serious damage to economic and financial stability. Uncovering the challenges that the money masters may face in an uncertain future, this book will be of interest to academics, researchers, and practitioners in central banking, finance, and economics at large.


Author : United States. Congress. Joint Economic Committee. Subcommittee on Economic Goals and Intergovernmental Policy
Publisher :
Release : 1985
Page : 345
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Peter Conti-Brown
Rosa Maria Lastra
Publisher : Edward Elgar Publishing
Release : 2018
Page : 592
Category :
ISBN 13 : 1784719226
Description :


Central banks occupy a unique space in their national governments and in the global economy. The study of central banking however, has too often been dominated by an abstract theoretical approach that fails to grasp central banks’ institutional nuances. This comprehensive and insightful Handbook, takes a wider angle on central banks and central banking, focusing on the institutions of central banking. By 'institutions', Peter Conti-Brown and Rosa Lastra refer to the laws, traditions, norms, and rules used to structure central bank organisations. The Research Handbook on Central Banking’s institutional approach is one of the most interdisciplinary efforts to consider its topic, and includes chapters from leading and rising central bankers, economists, lawyers, legal scholars, political scientists, historians, and others.


Author : Dominique Ritleng
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2016-02-12
Page : 300
Category : Law
ISBN 13 : 0191082449
Description :


As EU non-majoritarian bodies such as the European Commission, the Court of Justice of the European Union, and the European Central Bank grow in political influence, many have identified the pressing need to keep these bodies accountable to the repositories of the EU's democratic legitimacy. This collection of essays sheds light on the inherent tension between independence and legitimacy in the EU's institutional system and explores the options of reconciling the two. Featuring analysis from both legal and political perspectives, the volume assesses whether, to what extent, and how it is possible to control the various EU independent bodies and make them answerable for what they do, while at the same time upholding their independence.


Author :
Publisher :
Release : 1934
Page :
Category : Political science
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : G. C. Harcourt
Peter Kriesler
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2013-08-16
Page : 528
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 0199359237
Description :


This two volume Handbook contains chapters on the main areas to which Post-Keynesians have made sustained and important contributions. These include theories of accumulation, distribution, pricing, money and finance, international trade and capital flows, the environment, methodological issues, criticism of mainstream economics and Post-Keynesian policies. The Introduction outlines what is in the two volumes, in the process placing Post-Keynesian procedures and contributions in appropriate contexts.


Author : Paul Tucker
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2019-09-10
Page : 664
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 0691196303
Description :


Tucker presents guiding principles for ensuring that central bankers and other unelected policymakers remain stewards of the common good.


Author : United States. Congress. Joint Economic Committee
Publisher :
Release : 1966
Page :
Category : Legislative hearings
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Sarah Binder
Mark Spindel
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2019-07-09
Page : 304
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 069119159X
Description :


An in-depth look at how politics and economics shape the relationship between Congress and the Federal Reserve Born out of crisis a century ago, the Federal Reserve has become the most powerful macroeconomic policymaker and financial regulator in the world. The Myth of Independence marshals archival sources, interviews, and statistical analyses to trace the Fed’s transformation from a weak, secretive, and decentralized institution in 1913 to a remarkably transparent central bank a century later. Offering a unique account of Congress’s role in steering this evolution, Sarah Binder and Mark Spindel explore the Fed’s past, present, and future and challenge the myth of its independence.


Author : John D. Ciorciari
John B. Taylor
Publisher : Hoover Press
Release : 2013-09-01
Page : 230
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 0817950036
Description :


Expert contributors examine the recent actions of the Federal Reserve and suggest directions for the Fed going forward by drawing on past political, historical, and market principles. They explain how the Fed arrived at its current position, offer ideas on how to exit the situation, and propose new market-based reforms that can help keep the Fed on the road to good monetary policy in the future.


Author : Jane W. D'Arista
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2016-09-17
Page : 400
Category : Business & Economics
ISBN 13 : 1315484714
Description :


In the early post-Soviet period, Ukraine appeared to be firmly on the path to democracy. But the Kuchma presidency was clouded by dark rumors of corruption and even political murder, and, by 2004, the country was in full-blown political crisis. This book looks beyond these dramatic events and aims to identify the actual play of power in Ukraine.