Unequal Childhoods Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Annette Lareau
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 2011-08-02
Page : 461
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0520271424
Description :


This book is a powerful portrayal of class inequalities in the United States. It contains insightful analysis of the processes through which inequality is reproduced, and it frankly engages with methodological and analytic dilemmas usually glossed over in academic texts.


Author : Annette Lareau
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 2003-09-11
Page : 331
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0520239504
Description :


Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class and poor families, this study explores the fact that class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children and offers a picture of childhood in the 21st century.


Author : Helen Penn
Publisher : Psychology Press
Release : 2005
Page : 219
Category : Education
ISBN 13 : 9780415321020
Description :


While problems of childhood poverty are most widespread in developing countries, formidable inequalities exist in more prosperous countries. A major aim of the book is to address the question of unequal childhoodsand the ways in which they are.


Author : Annette Lareau
Publisher : Tantor Media Incorporated
Release : 2014-05-08
Page :
Category : SOCIAL SCIENCE
ISBN 13 : 9781452624716
Description :


The second edition of Annette Lareau's "Unequal Childhoods" contains the classic analysis of how social class shapes parenting and revisits the original families a decade after the original study to examine the effects of social class in the transition to adulthood.


Author : David Grusky
Jasmine Hill
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2018-05-15
Page : 506
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 042996837X
Description :


This book provides selections from the seminal works of Karl Marx, Max Weber, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman that reveal some of the reasons why class, race, and gender inequalities have proven very adaptive and can flourish even today in the 21st century.


Author : Laura Assmuth
Marina Hakkarainen
Publisher : Springer
Release : 2018-07-20
Page : 271
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 3319897349
Description :


This collection explores mobile childhoods: from Latvia and Estonia to Finland; from Latvia to the United Kingdom; from Russia to Finland; and cyclical mobility by the Roma between Romania and Finland. The chapters examine how east-to-north European family mobility brings out different kinds of multilocal childhoods. The children experience unequal starting points and further twists throughout their childhood and within their family lives. Through the innovative use of ethnographic and participatory methods, the contributors demonstrate how diverse migrant children’s everyday lives are, and how children themselves as well as their translocal families actively pursue better lives. The topics include naming and food practices, travel, schooling, summer holidays, economic and other inequalities, and the importance of age in understanding children’s lives. Translocal Childhoods and Family Mobility in East and North Europe will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and human geography.


Author : Helen Penn
Publisher : Psychology Press
Release : 2005
Page : 219
Category : Education
ISBN 13 : 9780415321013
Description :


Early childhood in rich countries is a time when children are protected, and their playfulness and curiosity is encouraged. However, this perception co-exists with toleration of political and economic conditions that grossly undermine or even prematurely end the lives of millions of young children in poor countries. This book discusses how this poverty is recognized and defined through the following case-studies: * Kazakhstan - once part of the Soviet Union * Swaziland - a country in Southern Africa devastated by HIV and AIDS * Himalayan India * Brazil - one of the world's most unequal countries. These four case-studies illustrate the diversity and complexity of the responses to the attempts to globalize childhood, and highlight the need to address the inequalities of childhood experience. This book will be invaluable to anyone on early childhood courses with an international focus or studying early childhood in an international context.


Author : Annette Lareau
Kimberly Goyette
Publisher : Russell Sage Foundation
Release : 2014-03-31
Page : 352
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1610448200
Description :


A series of policy shifts over the past decade promises to change how Americans decide where to send their children to school. In theory, the boom in standardized test scores and charter schools will allow parents to evaluate their assigned neighborhood school, or move in search of a better option. But what kind of data do parents actually use while choosing schools? Are there differences among suburban and urban families? How do parents’ choices influence school and residential segregation in America? Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools presents a breakthrough analysis of the new era of school choice, and what it portends for American neighborhoods. The distinguished contributors to Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools investigate the complex relationship between education, neighborhood social networks, and larger patterns of inequality. Paul Jargowsky reviews recent trends in segregation by race and class. His analysis shows that segregation between blacks and whites has declined since 1970, but remains extremely high. Moreover, white families with children are less likely than childless whites to live in neighborhoods with more minority residents. In her chapter, Annette Lareau draws on interviews with parents in three suburban neighborhoods to analyze school-choice decisions. Surprisingly, she finds that middle- and upper-class parents do not rely on active research, such as school tours or test scores. Instead, most simply trust advice from friends and other people in their network. Their decision-making process was largely informal and passive. Eliot Weinginer complements this research when he draws from his data on urban parents. He finds that these families worry endlessly about the selection of a school, and that parents of all backgrounds actively consider alternatives, including charter schools. Middle- and upper-class parents relied more on federally mandated report cards, district websites, and online forums, while working-class parents use network contacts to gain information on school quality. Little previous research has explored what role school concerns play in the preferences of white and minority parents for particular neighborhoods. Featuring innovative work from more than a dozen scholars, Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools adroitly addresses this gap and provides a firmer understanding of how Americans choose where to live and send their children to school.


Author : Manfred Liebel
Publisher :
Release : 2020-05
Page :
Category :
ISBN 13 : 1447356403
Description :


First book since 2004 to look at childhood from a postcolonial perspective and reflect on postcolonial theory in relation to children and childhoods, building on work by Cannella and Viruru (2004). From one of the pioneers of childhood studies, Liebel uses a broad array of international case studies to examine the repercussions of colonial conquest on children's lives and childhood policies today. Looking at how children in the Global South are affected by unequal power relations, paternalistic policies and violence by state and non-state actors, he shows how we can work to decolonize childhoods and ensure that children's rights are better promoted and protected. 'Genuinely ground-breaking. This is a seminal book which works as a textbook, a teaching resource and a highly significant contribution to knowledge. It is characterized by authority and enthusiasm.' -- Heather Montgomery, The Open University


Author : Annette Lareau
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 2003-09-11
Page : 343
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 9780520930476
Description :


Class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children. Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class, and poor families, Unequal Childhoods explores this fact, offering a picture of childhood today. Here are the frenetic families managing their children's hectic schedules of "leisure" activities; and here are families with plenty of time but little economic security. Lareau shows how middle-class parents, whether black or white, engage in a process of "concerted cultivation" designed to draw out children's talents and skills, while working-class and poor families rely on "the accomplishment of natural growth," in which a child's development unfolds spontaneously—as long as basic comfort, food, and shelter are provided. Each of these approaches to childrearing brings its own benefits and its own drawbacks. In identifying and analyzing differences between the two, Lareau demonstrates the power, and limits, of social class in shaping the lives of America's children. The first edition of Unequal Childhoods was an instant classic, portraying in riveting detail the unexpected ways in which social class influences parenting in white and African-American families. A decade later, Annette Lareau has revisited the same families and interviewed the original subjects to examine the impact of social class in the transition to adulthood.


Author : Elliott B. Weininger
Annette Lareau
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2018-07-27
Page : 270
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0429874782
Description :


Microsociologists seek to capture social life as it is experienced, and in recent decades no one has championed the microsociological approach more fiercely than Randall Collins. The pieces in this exciting volume offer fresh and original insights into key aspects of Collins’ thought, and of microsociology more generally. The introductory essay by Elliot B. Weininger and Omar Lizardo provides a lucid overview of the key premises this perspective. Ethnographic papers by Randol Contreras, using data from New York, and Philippe Bourgois and Laurie Kain Hart, using data from Philadelphia, examine the social logic of violence in street-level narcotics markets. Both draw on heavily on Collins’ microsociological account of the features of social situations that tend to engender violence. In the second section of the book, a study by Paul DiMaggio, Clark Bernier, Charles Heckscher, and David Mimno tackles the question of whether electronically mediated interaction exhibits the ritualization which, according to Collins, is a common feature of face-to-face encounters. Their results suggest that, at least under certain circumstances, digitally mediated interaction may foster social solidarity in a manner similar to face-to-face interaction. A chapter by Simone Polillo picks up from Collins’ work in the sociology of knowledge, examining multiple ways in which social network structures can engender intellectual creativity. The third section of the book contains papers that critically but sympathetically assess key tenets of microsociology. Jonathan H. Turner argues that the radically microsociological perspective developed by Collins will better serve the social scientific project if it is embedded in a more comprehensive paradigm, one that acknowledges the macro- and meso-levels of social and cultural life. A chapter by David Gibson presents empirical analyses of decisions by state leaders concerning whether or not to use force to deal with internal or external foes, suggesting that Collins’ model of interaction ritual can only partially illuminate the dynamics of these highly consequential political moments. Work by Erika Summers-Effler and Justin Van Ness seeks to systematize and broaden the scope of Collins’ theory of interaction, by including in it encounters that depart from the ritual model in important ways. In a final, reflective chapter, Randall Collins himself highlights the promise and future of microsociology. Clearly written, these pieces offer cutting-edge thinking on some of the crucial theoretical and empirical issues in sociology today.


Author : John Brueggemann
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2020-11-26
Page : 512
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1000153126
Description :


For courses in Inequality, Social Stratification, and Social Problems. A thoughtful compilation of readings on inequality in the United States. The main objective of this text is to introduce students to the subject of social stratification as it has developed in sociology. The central focus is on domestic inequality in the United States with some attention to the broader international context. The primary goal of the text is to offer an understanding of the history and context of debates about inequality, and a secondary goal is to give some indication as to what issues are likely to arise in the future.


Author : Marcia Carlson
Paula England
Publisher : Stanford University Press
Release : 2011-06-21
Page : 230
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0804770891
Description :


This book offers an up-to-the-moment assessment of the condition of the American family in an era of growing inequality.


Author : Karl Kitching
Publisher :
Release : 2020-05
Page : 248
Category : Education
ISBN 13 : 9781782053880
Description :


Debates about religion and education internationally often presume the neutrality of secular education governance, as an irrefutable public good. However, understandings of secular freedom, rights and neutrality in schooling are continuously contested, and social movements have disrupted the notion there is a uniform public to be educated. Simultaneously, unjust, neo-liberal and majoritarian education policies constantly undermine collective notions of what is good and just. The book examines how education policy positions religious and secular school providers as competitors for parents' attention, and shows how inequalities shape parents' interest in and access to secular/religious schools. Kitching particularly explores how children in urban and rural settings negotiate the joys, pleasures, paradoxes and injustices of schooling and childhood. It outlines ways in which children's social position, relationships and encounters with religious and consumer objects inform who they can become, and who and what they value. Drawing on the above research, Childhood, Religion and School Injustice demonstrates the need to engage with each child's plurality, and to recognise multiple inequalities experienced by families across schools. Given the tendency towards mass school privatisation, Kitching argues for the context-specific becoming public of school systems and localities, where majoritarian, narrow self-interest is challenged, unchosen obligations to others are recognised, and collective imaginings of what a 'good' childhood is, are publicly engaged.


Author : Shamus Rahman Khan
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2021-08-17
Page : 248
Category : Education
ISBN 13 : 0691229201
Description :


As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality. In Privilege, Shamus Khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. He shows that St. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Yet, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, family connections, and high culture, current St. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, faculty, and staff, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule.


Author : Tey Meadow
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release : 2018-08-17
Page : 320
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0520964160
Description :


Trans Kids is a trenchant ethnographic and interview-based study of the first generation of families affirming and facilitating gender nonconformity in children. Earlier generations of parents sent such children for psychiatric treatment aimed at a cure, but today, many parents agree to call their children new names, allow them to wear whatever clothing they choose, and approach the state to alter the gender designation on their passports and birth certificates. Drawing from sociology, philosophy, psychology, and sexuality studies, sociologist Tey Meadow depicts the intricate social processes that shape gender acquisition. Where once atypical gender expression was considered a failure of gender, now it is a form of gender. Engaging and rigorously argued, Trans Kids underscores the centrality of ever more particular configurations of gender in both our physical and psychological lives, and the increasing embeddedness of personal identities in social institutions.


Author : S. Balagopalan
Publisher : Springer
Release : 2014-04-29
Page : 237
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1137316799
Description :


Through a rich ethnography of street and working children in Calcutta, India, this book offers the first sustained enquiry into postcolonial childhoods, arguing that the lingering effects of colonialism are central to comprehending why these children struggle to inhabit the transition from labour to schooling.


Author : Alice Fothergill
Lori Peek
Publisher : University of Texas Press
Release : 2015-09-01
Page : 343
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 1477305467
Description :


When children experience upheaval and trauma, adults often view them as either vulnerable and helpless or as resilient and able to easily “bounce back.” But the reality is far more complex for the children and youth whose lives are suddenly upended by disaster. How are children actually affected by catastrophic events and how do they cope with the damage and disruption? Children of Katrina offers one of the only long-term, multiyear studies of young people following disaster. Sociologists Alice Fothergill and Lori Peek spent seven years after Hurricane Katrina interviewing and observing several hundred children and their family members, friends, neighbors, teachers, and other caregivers. In this book, they focus intimately on seven children between the ages of three and eighteen, selected because they exemplify the varied experiences of the larger group. They find that children followed three different post-disaster trajectories—declining, finding equilibrium, and fluctuating—as they tried to regain stability. The children’s moving stories illuminate how a devastating disaster affects individual health and well-being, family situations, housing and neighborhood contexts, schooling, peer relationships, and extracurricular activities. This work also demonstrates how outcomes were often worse for children who were vulnerable and living in crisis before the storm. Fothergill and Peek clarify what kinds of assistance children need during emergency response and recovery periods, as well as the individual, familial, social, and structural factors that aid or hinder children in getting that support.


Author : Victor M. Rios
Publisher : NYU Press
Release : 2011-06-27
Page : 218
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 081477637X
Description :


The author discusses his background as a former gang member and juvenile delinquent in Oakland, California, during the 1980s and 1990s, details his efforts to study the lives of young men from his neighborhood after earning a PhD in sociology at Berkeley, and emphasizes the importance of understanding in order to develop solutions for young men who live in a culture of punishment.


Author : Diane Reay
Publisher : Taylor & Francis
Release : 1998
Page : 198
Category : Education
ISBN 13 : 1857289161
Description :


"[Book title] analyzes the way in which women's educational experience influences their involvement in their children's schooling. The author highlights the crucial part mothers play in social reproduction and argues for the need to recognize their centrality to understandings of social class. The book also includes an examination of the role played by fathers in their children's schooling."--Back cover.