Violence In Medieval Europe Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : Warren C. Brown
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2014-06-11
Page : 344
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1317866215
Description :


The European Middle Ages have long attracted popular interest as an era characterised by violence, whether a reflection of societal brutality and lawlessness or part of a romantic vision of chivalry. Violence in Medieval Europe engages with current scholarly debate about the degree to which medieval European society was in fact shaped by such forces. Drawing on a wide variety of primary sources, Warren Brown examines the norms governing violence within medieval societies from the sixth to the fourteenth century, over an area covering the Romance and the Germanic-speaking regions of the continent as well as England. Scholars have often told the story of violence and power in the Middle Ages as one in which 'private' violence threatened and sometimes destroyed 'public' order. Yet academics are now asking to what degree violence that we might call private, in contrast to the violence wielded by a central authority, might have been an effective social tool. Here, Brown looks at how private individuals exercised violence in defence of their rights or in vengeance for wrongs within a set of clearly understood social rules, and how over the course of this period, kings began to claim the exclusive right to regulate the violence of their subjects as part of their duty to uphold God's order on earth. Violence in Medieval Europe provides both an original take on the subject and an illuminating synthesis of recent and classic scholarship. It will be invaluable to students and scholars of history, medieval studies and related areas, for the light it casts not just on violence, but on the evolution of the medieval political order.


Author : Richard W. Kaeuper
Publisher : Oxford University Press on Demand
Release : 2001
Page : 338
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0199244588
Description :


This original and authoritative text reveals how chivalry was part of the problem of violence in medieval Europe, not merely its solution. The ideal was to internalize restraint in knights, but a close reading of chivalric literature shows chivalry also praised heroic violence by knights. This fascinating book lays bare the conflicts and paradoxes surrounding the concept of chivalry in medieval Europe.


Author : Richard W.. Kaeuper
Richard W. Kaeuper
Publisher : Boydell & Brewer Ltd
Release : 2000
Page : 226
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780851157740
Description :


Studies of ways in which the rapidly evolving society of medieval Europe developed social, legal and practical responses to public and private violence.


Author : Radosław Kotecki
Jacek Maciejewski
Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Release : 2014-10-17
Page : 375
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1443870021
Description :


Ecclesia et Violentia is an interdisciplinary anthology that explores the phenomenon of violence in relation to the medieval Church, as well as within the structures of that institution. The volume provides a clearer understanding of hostile and violent acts against both religious institutions and clergy, and explores the interpersonal aggression between clergymen or forms of violent behaviour of medieval clerics. It investigates, furthermore, the role of violence in maintaining discipline within religious communities, as well as religious, legal and cultural interpretations of the aforementioned issues. However, despite the many points of view expressed here, the central question the authors reconcile is how the phenomenon of violence interacted with the most important medieval institution, and official Church thinking regarding concepts such as power, rank, feudal loyalty and protection and ownership. Through the geographical diversity of the contributions and the variety of disciplinary perspectives, this book highlights how important violence was in the life of the clergy and how it formed an integral part of the legal culture and social bonds in many regions of medieval Europe.


Author : Warren C. Brown
Piotr Górecki
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2017-05-15
Page : 344
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1351949721
Description :


Conflict is defined here broadly and inclusively as an element of social life and social relations. Its study encompasses the law, not just disputes concerning property, but wider issues of criminality, coercion and violence, status, sex, sexuality and gender, as well as the phases and manifestations of conflict and the behaviors brought to bear on it. It engages, too, with the nature of the transformation spanning the Carolingian period, and its implications for the meanings of power, violence, and peace. Conflict in Medieval Europe represents the 'American school' of the study of medieval conflict and social order. Framed by two substantial historiographical and conceptual surveys of the field, it brings together two generations of scholars: the pioneers, who continue to expand the research agenda; and younger colleagues, who represent the best emerging work on this subject. The book therefore both marks the trajectory of conflict studies in the United States and presents a set of original, highly individual contributions across a shifting conceptual range, indicative of a major transition in the field.


Author : Allie Terry-Fritsch
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2017-07-05
Page : 298
Category : Art
ISBN 13 : 1351574248
Description :


Interested in the ways in which medieval and early modern communities have acted as participants, observers, and interpreters of events and how they ascribed meaning to them, the essays in this interdisciplinary collection explore the concept of beholding and the experiences of individual and collective beholders of violence during the period. Addressing a range of medieval and early modern art forms, including visual images, material objects, literary texts, and performances, the contributors examine the complexities of viewing and the production of knowledge within cultural, political, and theological contexts. In considering new methods to examine the process of beholding violence and the beholder's perspective, this volume addresses such questions as: How does the process of beholding function in different aesthetic conditions? Can we speak of such a thing as the 'period eye' or an acculturated gaze of the viewer? If so, does this particularize the gaze, or does it risk universalizing perception? How do violence and pleasure intersect within the visual and literary arts? How can an understanding of violence in cultural representation serve as means of knowing the past and as means of understanding and potentially altering the present?


Author : Jeffrey A. Bowman
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release : 2018-10-18
Page : 304
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1501721046
Description :


In a major contribution to the debate among medievalists about the nature of social and political change in Europe around the turn of the millennium, Jeffrey A. Bowman explores how people contended over property during the tenth and eleventh centuries in the province of Narbonne. He examines the system of courts and judges that weighed property disputes and shows how disputants and judges gradually adapted, modified, and reshaped legal traditions. The region (which comprised Catalonia and parts of Mediterranean France) possessed a distinctive legal culture, characterized by the prominent role of professional judges, a high level of procedural sophistication, and an intense attachment to written law, particularly the Visigothic Code. At the same time, disputants relied on a range of strategies (including custom, curses, and judicial ordeals) to resolve conflicts. Chronic tensions stemmed from conflicting understandings of property rights rather than from pervasive violence; the changes Bowman tracks are less signs of a world convulsed in struggle than of a world coursing with vitality. In Shifting Landmarks, property disputes serve as a bridge between the author's inquiry into learned ideas about justice, land, and the law and his close examination of the rough-and-tumble practice of daily life. Throughout, Bowman finds intimate connections among ink and parchment, sweat and earth.


Author : Jehangir Yezdi Malegam
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release : 2013-03-12
Page : 352
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0801467896
Description :


In The Sleep of Behemoth, Jehangir Yezdi Malegam explores the emergence of conflicting concepts of peace in western Europe during the High Middle Ages. Ever since the Early Church, Christian thinkers had conceived of their peace separate from the peace of the world, guarded by the sacraments and shared only grudgingly with powers and principalities. To kingdoms and communities they had allowed attenuated versions of this peace, modes of accommodation and domination that had tranquility as the goal. After 1000, reformers in the papal curia and monks and canons in the intellectual circles of northern France began to reimagine the Church as an engine of true peace, whose task it was eventually to absorb all peoples through progressive acts of revolutionary peacemaking. Peace as they envisioned it became a mandate for reform through conflict, coercion, and insurrection. And the pursuit of mere tranquility appeared dangerous, and even diabolical. As Malegam shows, within western Christendom's major centers of intellectual activity and political thought, the clergy competed over the meaning and monopolization of the term "peace." contrasting it with what one canon lawyer called the "sleep of Behemoth," a diabolical "false" peace of lassitude and complacency, one that produced unsuitable forms of community and friendship that must be overturned at all costs. Out of this contest over the meaning and ownership of true peace, Malegam concludes, medieval thinkers developed theologies that shaped secular political theory in the later Middle Ages. The Sleep of Behemoth traces this radical experiment in redefining the meaning of peace from the papal courts of Rome and the schools of Laon, Liege, and Paris to its gradual spread across the continent and its impact on such developments as the rise of papal monarchism; the growth of urban, communal self-government; and the emergence of secular and mystical scholasticism.


Author : Pieter Spierenburg
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release : 2013-04-18
Page : 300
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0745658636
Description :


This book offers a fascinating and insightful overview of seven centuries of murder in Europe. It tells the story of the changing face of violence and documents the long-term decline in the incidence of homicide. From medieval vendettas to stylised duels, from the crime passionel of the modern period right up to recent public anxieties about serial killings and underworld assassinations, the book offers a richly illustrated account of murder’s metamorphoses. In this original and compelling contribution, Spierenburg sheds new light on several important themes. He looks, for example, at the transformation of homicide from a private matter, followed by revenge or reconciliation, into a public crime, always subject to state intervention. Combining statistical data with a cultural approach, he demonstrates the crucial role gender played in the spiritualisation of male honour and the subsequent reduction of male-on-male aggression, as well as offering a comparative view of how different social classes practised and reacted to violence. This authoritative study will be of great value to students and scholars of the history of crime and violence, criminology and the sociology of violence. At a time when murder rates are rising and public fears about violent crime are escalating, this book will also interest the general reader intrigued by how our relationship with murder reached this point.


Author : David Nirenberg
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release : 2015-05-26
Page : 328
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0691165769
Description :


In the wake of modern genocide, we tend to think of violence against minorities as a sign of intolerance, or, even worse, a prelude to extermination. Violence in the Middle Ages, however, functioned differently, according to David Nirenberg. In this provocative book, he focuses on specific attacks against minorities in fourteenth-century France and the Crown of Aragon (Aragon, Catalonia, and Valencia). He argues that these attacks--ranging from massacres to verbal assaults against Jews, Muslims, lepers, and prostitutes--were often perpetrated not by irrational masses laboring under inherited ideologies and prejudices, but by groups that manipulated and reshaped the available discourses on minorities. Nirenberg shows that their use of violence expressed complex beliefs about topics as diverse as divine history, kinship, sex, money, and disease, and that their actions were frequently contested by competing groups within their own society. Nirenberg's readings of archival and literary sources demonstrates how violence set the terms and limits of coexistence for medieval minorities. The particular and contingent nature of this coexistence is underscored by the book's juxtapositions--some systematic (for example, that of the Crown of Aragon with France, Jew with Muslim, medieval with modern), and some suggestive (such as African ritual rebellion with Catalan riots). Throughout, the book questions the applicability of dichotomies like tolerance versus intolerance to the Middle Ages, and suggests the limitations of those analyses that look for the origins of modern European persecutory violence in the medieval past.


Author : Allie Terry-Fritsch
Erin Felicia Labbie
Publisher : Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Release : 2012
Page : 269
Category : Art
ISBN 13 : 9781409442868
Description :


Interrogating how medieval and early modern communities have acted as participants, observers, and interpreters of events and how they ascribed meaning to them, the essays in this collection explore the experience of individual or collective beholders of violence during the period. Addressing a range of medieval and early modern art forms, including visual images, objects, texts, and performances, the contributors examine the complexities of viewing and the production of knowledge across temporal moments.


Author : Jonathan Davies
Publisher : Routledge
Release : 2016-04-08
Page : 276
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 131717805X
Description :


Interest in the history of violence has increased dramatically over the last ten years and recent studies have demonstrated the productive potential for further inquiry in this field. The early modern period is particularly ripe for further investigation because of the pervasiveness of violence. Certain countries may have witnessed a drop in the number of recorded homicides during this period, yet homicide is not the only marker of a violent society. This volume presents a range of contributions that look at various aspects of violence from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries, from student violence and misbehaviour in fifteenth-century Oxford and Paris to the depiction of war wounds in the English civil wars. The book is divided into three sections, each clustering chapters around the topics of interpersonal and ritual violence, war, and justice and the law. Informed by the disciplines of anthropology, criminology, the history of art, literary studies, and sociology, as well as history, the contributors examine all forms of violence including manslaughter, assault, rape, riots, war and justice. Previous studies have tended to emphasise long-term trends in violent behaviour but one must always be attentive to the specificity of violence and these essays reveal what it meant in particular places and at particular times.


Author : Ephraim Shoham-Steiner
Publisher : Wayne State University Press
Release : 2020-11-10
Page : 476
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0814345603
Description :


Jews and Crime in Medieval Europe is a topic laced by prejudice on one hand and apologetics on the other. Beginning in the Middle Ages, Jews were often portrayed as criminals driven by greed. While these accusations were, for the most part, unfounded, in other cases criminal accusations against Jews were not altogether baseless. Drawing on a variety of legal, liturgical, literary, and archival sources, Ephraim Shoham-Steiner examines the reasons for the involvement in crime, the social profile of Jews who performed crimes, and the ways and mechanisms employed by the legal and communal body to deal with Jewish criminals and with crimes committed by Jews. A society’s attitude toward individuals identified as criminals—by others or themselves—can serve as a window into that society’s mores and provide insight into how transgressors understood themselves and society’s attitudes toward them. The book is divided into three main sections. In the first section, Shoham-Steiner examines theft and crimes of a financial nature. In the second section, he discusses physical violence and murder, most importantly among Jews but also incidents when Jews attacked others and cases in which Jews asked non-Jews to commit violence against fellow Jews. In the third section, Shoham-Steiner approaches the role of women in crime and explores the gender differences, surveying the nature of the crimes involving women both as perpetrators and as victims, as well as the reaction to their involvement in criminal activities among medieval European Jews. While the study of crime and social attitudes toward criminals is firmly established in the social sciences, the history of crime and of social attitudes toward crime and criminals is relatively new, especially in the field of medieval studies and all the more so in medieval Jewish studies. Jews and Crime in Medieval Europe blazes a new path for unearthing daily life history from extremely recalcitrant sources. The intended readership goes beyond scholars and students of medieval Jewish studies, medieval European history, and crime in pre-modern society.


Author : Theresa Earenfight
Publisher : Macmillan International Higher Education
Release : 2013-06-21
Page : 368
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1137303921
Description :


Medieval queens led richly complex lives and were highly visible women active in a man's world. Linked to kings by marriage, family, and property, queens were vital to the institution of monarchy. In this comprehensive and accessible introduction to the study of queenship, Theresa Earenfight documents the lives and works of queens and empresses across Europe, Byzantium, and the Mediterranean in the Middle Ages. The book: * introduces pivotal research and sources in queenship studies, and includes exciting and innovative new archival research * highlights four crucial moments across the full span of the Middle Ages – ca. 300, 700, 1100, and 1350 – when Christianity, education, lineage, and marriage law fundamentally altered the practice of queenship * examines theories and practices of queenship in the context of wider issues of gender, authority, and power. This is an invaluable and illuminating text for students, scholars and other readers interested in the role of royal women in medieval society.


Author : Hannah Skoda
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2013-02-21
Page : 282
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0199670838
Description :


Describes and analyses brutality in the later Middle Ages, focusing on a thriving region of Northern France. Explores experiences of, and attitudes towards, violence. Offers fresh ways of thinking about violence in societies, and throws new light on the social life of villages and towns in a transitional period.


Author : Guy Halsall
Publisher : Boydell & Brewer Ltd
Release : 2002
Page : 230
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780851158495
Description :


Essays suggest or explore reasons why violent acts might have been perpetrated, and attempt to understand the social priorities which governed such acts.


Author : Sara Margaret Butler
Publisher : BRILL
Release : 2007-01
Page : 286
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9004156348
Description :


Drawing on a wide range of legal and literary sources, this book offers a comprehensive investigation into the acceptability of violence in marriage at a time when social expectations of gender and marriage were in transition.


Author : Daniel Lord Smail
Kelly Gibson
Publisher : University of Toronto Press
Release : 2009-01-01
Page : 474
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 1442601264
Description :


How did medieval society deal with private justice, with grudges, and with violent emotions? This ground-breaking reader collects for the first time a number of unpublished or difficult-to-find texts that address violence and emotion in the Middle Ages. The sources collected here illustrate the power and reach of the language of vengeance in medieval European society. They span the early, high, and later middle ages, and capture a range of perspectives including legal sources, learned commentaries, narratives, and documents of practice. Though social elites necessarily figure prominently in all medieval sources, sources concerning relatively low-status individuals and sources pertaining to women are included. The sources range from saints' lives that illustrate the idea of vengeance to later medieval court records concerning vengeful practices. A secondary goal of the collection is to illustrate the prominence of mechanisms for peacemaking in medieval European society. The introduction traces recent scholarly developments in the study of vengeance and discusses the significance of these concepts for medieval political and social history.


Author : Daniel Lord Smail
Kelly Gibson
Publisher :
Release :
Page : 474
Category :
ISBN 13 :
Description :



Author : Eve Salisbury
Georgiana Donavin
Publisher :
Release : 2002-01
Page : 354
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 9780813024424
Description :


"Challenges readers to acknowledge the extent to which violence figured in medieval texts and, with this recognition, to reconsider what the works teach us not only about the treatments and troping of victims in the medieval world but also how these patterns are a part of the social history of domestic violence."--Ann Dobyns, University of Denver Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts addresses a topic critical to our understanding of the medieval past--its notions of childhood and marital relations, its attitudes toward corporal punishment, and its contribution to the shaping of our present-day notions of family values. Using a wide range of late medieval narratives, including poetry, law, sermons, saints' lives, drama, and iconography, the authors explore the meaning and social effects of punitive violence within the domestic sphere. As the first collection to analyze such early manifestations of a problem still afflicting society today, it will be an insightful reference not only for medievalists but for students of literature, history, sociology, psychology, and law as well. Contents: Introduction, by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price Part One. Domestic Violence and the Law 1. Interpreting Silence: Domestic Violence in the King's Courts in East Anglia, 1422-1442, by Philippa Maddern 2. The "Reasonable" Laws of Domestic Violence in Late Medieval England, by Emma Hawkes Part Two. Fictional Histories: Domestic Violence and Literary/Legal Texts 3. Chaucer's "Wife," the Law, and the Middle English Breton Lays, by Eve Salisbury 4. Taboo and Transgression in Gower's Appollonius of Tyre, by Georgiana Donavin 5. Reframing the Violence of the Father: Reverse Oedipal Fantasies in Chaucer's Clerk's, Man of Law's, and Prioress's Tales, by Barrie Ruth Straus 6. Not Safe Even in Their Own Castles: Reading Domestic Violence Against Children in Four Middle English Romances, by Graham N. Drake 7. Domestic Violence in the Decameron, by Marilyn Migiel 8. Reading Riannon: The Problematics of Motherhood in Pwyll Pendeuic, by Christopher G. Nugent Part Three. Historical Fictions: Domestic Violence in Chronicle, Drama, Hagiography, and Illuminations 9. The "Homicidal Women" Stories in the Roman de Thebes, the Brut Chronicles, and Deschamps' "Ballade 285," by Anna Roberts 10. Noah's Wife: The Shaming of the "Trew," by Garrett P. J. Epp 11. Marriage, Socialization, and Domestic Violence in The Life of Christina of Markyate, by Robert Stanton 12. Imperial Violence and the Monstrous Mother: Cannibalism at the Siege of Jerusalem, by Merrall Llewelyn Price 13. The Feminized World and Divine Violence: Texts and Images of the Apocalypse, by Anne Laskaya Eve Salisbury is assistant professor of English at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. Georgiana Donavin is associate professor of English at Westminster College, Salt Lake City. Merrall L. Price has written articles on violence in the Middle Ages and is currently pursuing research on anti-Semitism and reproductive politics in late medieval Europe and contemporary North America.