William Bartram On The Southeastern Indians Download Ebook PDF Epub Online

Author : William Bartram
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 2002-01-01
Page : 343
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780803262058
Description :


William Bartram traveled throughout the American Southeast from 1773 to 1776. He occupies a unique place as an American Enlightenment explorer, naturalist, writer, and artist whose work was widely admired in his time and thereafter. Coleridge, the Wordsworths, and other leading romantics found inspiration in his pages. Bartram's most famous work, Travels has remained in print since the first publication of the book in 1791. However, his writings on Indians have received less attention than they deserve. This volume contains all of Bartram's known writings on Native Americans: a new version of "Observations on the Creek and Cherokee Indians," originally edited by E. G. Squier and first published in 1853; a previously unpublished essay, "Some Hints and Observations Concerning the Civilization of the Indians, or Aborigines of America"; and extensive excerpts from Travels. These documents are among the most valuable accounts we have of the Creeks and Seminoles in the last half of the eighteenth century. Several illustrations by Bartram are also included. The editors provide information on the history of these documents and supply extensive annotations. The book opens with a biographical essay on Bartram and concludes with a thorough evaluation of his contributions to southeastern Indian ethnohistory, anthropology, and archaeology. The editors have identified and corrected a number of errors found in the extant literature concerning Bartram and his writings Gregory A. Waselkov, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of South Alabama, is coeditor with Peter H. Wood and M. Thomas Hatley of Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast (Nebraska 1989). Kathryn E. Holland Braund is an independent scholar and author of Deerskins and Duffels: The Creek Indian Trade with Anglo-America, 1865–1815 (Nebraska 1993).


Author : William Bartram
Publisher : Gibbs Smith
Release : 1791
Page : 332
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN 13 : 9780879050795
Description :


Bartram's Travels is one of the earliest and most important books of A merican natural history. For four years (1773-1777) William Bartram wandered through the virgin forests, valleys, and wetlands of the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida. His lyrical descriptions of the American wilderness influenced the work of literary figures while also becoming recognized as a classic of natural history writing.


Author : William Bartram
Publisher : Courier Corporation
Release : 2012-04-30
Page : 448
Category : Nature
ISBN 13 : 0486138666
Description :


First inexpensive, illustrated edition of early classic on American geography, plants, Indians, wildlife, early settlers. Influenced Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Chateaubriand. "A book of extraordinary beauty." — The New York Times. 13 illustrations.


Author : Kathryn E. Holland Braund
Charlotte M. Porter
Publisher : University of Alabama Press
Release : 2010-03-03
Page : 273
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0817355715
Description :


A classic work of history, ethnography, and botany, and an examination of the life and environs of the 18th-century south. William Bartram was a naturalist, artist, and author of Travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the ExtensiveTerritories of the Muscogulees, or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Choctaws. The book, based on his journey across the South, reflects a remarkable coming of age. In 1773, Bartram departed his family home near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as a British colonist; in 1777, he returned as a citizen of an emerging nation of the United States. The account of his journey, published in 1791, established a national benchmark for nature writing and remains a classic of American literature, scientific writing, and history. Brought up as a Quaker, Bartram portrayed nature through a poetic lens of experience as well as scientific observation, and his work provides a window on 18th-century southern landscapes. Particularly enlightening and appealing are Bartram’s detailed accounts of Seminole, Creek, and Cherokee peoples. The Bartram Trail Conference fosters Bartram scholarship through biennial conferences held along the route of his travels. This richly illustrated volume of essays, a selection from recent conferences, brings together scholarly contributions from history, archaeology, and botany. The authors discuss the political and personal context of his travels; species of interest to Bartram; Creek architecture; foodways in the 18th-century south, particularly those of Indian groups that Bartram encountered; rediscovery of a lost Bartram manuscript; new techniques for charting Bartram’s trail and imaging his collections; and a fine analysis of Bartram’s place in contemporary environmental issues.


Author : Matthew Jennings
Publisher :
Release : 2014-06-30
Page : 182
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780881464832
Description :


William Bartram has rightly been hailed as an astute, perceptive chronicler of Native American societies. In some ways he was able to see beyond the dominant ideologies of his day, some of which divided the worlds peoples into categories based on perceived savagism and civility. THE FLOWER HUNTER AND THE PEOPLE introduces Bartrams writings on Southeastern Native Americans and allows Bartram and his indigenous consultants to tell their stories in their own words. Along the way, readers should also consider this underlying fact, which rarely strayed from the Flower Hunters mind. William Bartram was a guest in the Native Southeast. He traveled on paths smoothed, figuratively and literally, by Native Americans. He stayed in Muskogees houses, ate Cherokees food, and was, at times permitted glimpses of his hosts worldviews and lifeways. The things they allowed Bartram to record bore cultural and political weight in their own times, and they can speak to us in ours as well.


Author : Robert Woods Sayre
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 2017-12
Page : 456
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0803280971
Description :


Machine generated contents note: List of Illustrations Preface Acknowledgments Introduction Part 1. Views of Modernity: Internal/External Discovery 1. Crevecoeur: British America before and during the Revolutionary Upheaval 2. Philip Freneau: After the Revolution 3. Moreau de Saint-Mery: Fin de Siecle Part 2. Views of the Other: Travels in "Indian Territory" 4. The Zero Degree of the Other: Indian Violence and "Adventure" with Indians 5. Accounts of Travel in New France: Lahontan and Charlevoix 6. Anglo-American Travelers: John Lawson and Jonathan Carver 7. Travels of William Bartram, Quaker Botanist 8. Fur Traders: Alexander Mackenzie and Jean-Baptiste Trudeau Epilogue: Into the Nineteenth Century--George Catlin Conclusion Appendix: Chronology of Historical Events, Travels, and Publications Notes Bibliography Index


Author : Izumi Ishii
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 2008-01-01
Page : 260
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 9780803216303
Description :


Bad Fruits of the Civilized Tree examines the role of alcohol among the Cherokees through more than two hundred years, from contact with white traders until Oklahoma reached statehood in 1907. While acknowledging the addictive and socially destructive effects of alcohol, Izumi Ishii also examines the ways in which alcohol was culturally integrated into Native society and how it served the overarching economic and political goals of the Cherokee Nation. ø Europeans introduced alcohol into Cherokee society during the colonial era, trading it for deerskins and using it to cement alliances with chiefs. In turn Cherokee leaders often redistributed alcohol among their people in order to buttress their power and regulate the substance?s consumption. Alcohol was also seen as containing spiritual power and was accordingly consumed in highly ritualized ceremonies. During the early-nineteenth century, Cherokee entrepreneurs learned enough about the business of the alcohol trade to throw off their American partners and begin operating alone within the Cherokee Nation. The Cherokees intensified their internal efforts to regulate alcohol consumption during the 1820s to demonstrate that they were ?civilized? and deserved to coexist with American citizens rather than be forcibly relocated westward. After removal from their land, however, the erosion of Cherokee sovereignty undermined the nation?s ongoing attempts to regulate alcohol. Bad Fruits of the Civilized Tree provides a new historical framework within which to study the meeting between Natives and Europeans in the New World and the impact of alcohol on Native communities.


Author : Edward J. Cashin
Publisher : Univ of South Carolina Press
Release : 2007-01-05
Page : 319
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9781570036859
Description :


In addition Cashin offers a detailed portrait of the often overlooked southern frontier on the eve of the Revolutionary War, revealing it to have been a coherent entity united by an uneasy coexistence of Native Americans and British colonials.


Author : Marvin T. Smith
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release : 2002
Page : 369
Category : Indians of North America
ISBN 13 : 9781604739558
Description :


With essays by Stephen Davis, Penelope Drooker, Patricia K. Galloway, Steven Hahn, Charles Hudson, Marvin Jeter, Paul Kelton, Timothy Pertulla, Christopher Rodning, Helen Rountree, Marvin T. Smith, and John Worth The first two-hundred years of Western civilization in the Americas was a time when fundamental and sometimes catastrophic changes occurred in Native American communities in the South. In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, historians, anthropologists, and archaeologists provide perspectives on how this era shaped American Indian society for later generations and how it even affects these communities today. This collection of essays presents the most current scholarship on the social history of the South, identifying and examining the historical forces, trends, and events that were attendant to the formation of the Indians of the colonial South. The essayists discuss how Southeastern Indian culture and society evolved. They focus on such aspects as the introduction of European diseases to the New World, long-distance migration and relocation, the influences of the Spanish mission system, the effects of the English plantation system, the northern fur trade of the English, and the French, Dutch, and English trade of Indian slaves and deerskins in the South. This book covers the full geographic and social scope of the Southeast, including the indigenous peoples of Florida, Virginia, Maryland, the Appalachian Mountains, the Carolina Piedmont, the Ohio Valley, and the Central and Lower Mississippi Valleys. Robbie Ethridge is an assistant professor of anthropology and southern studies at the University of Mississippi. Charles Hudson is Franklin Professor of Anthropology and History at the University of Georgia.


Author : Christoph Irmscher
Publisher : Rutgers University Press
Release : 2019-09-08
Page : 730
Category : Science
ISBN 13 : 1978805888
Description :


Early American naturalists assembled dazzling collections of native flora and fauna, from John Bartram’s botanical garden in Philadelphia and the artful display of animals in Charles Willson Peale’s museum to P. T. Barnum’s American Museum, infamously characterized by Henry James as “halls of humbug.” Yet physical collections were only one of the myriad ways that these naturalists captured, catalogued, and commemorated America’s rich biodiversity. They also turned to writing and art, from John Edward Holbrook’s forays into the fascinating world of herpetology to John James Audubon’s masterful portraits of American birds. In this groundbreaking, now classic book, Christoph Irmscher argues that early American natural historians developed a distinctly poetic sensibility that allowed them to imagine themselves as part of, and not apart from, their environment. He also demonstrates what happens to such inclusiveness in the hands of Harvard scientist-turned Amazonian explorer Louis Agassiz, whose racist pseudoscience appalled his student William James. This expanded, full-color edition of The Poetics of Natural History features a preface and art from award-winning artist Rosamond Purcell and invites the reader to be fully immersed in an era when the boundaries between literature, art, and science became fluid.


Author : Bernard Romans
Kathryn E. Holland Braund
Publisher : University of Alabama Press
Release : 1999-11-15
Page : 442
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0817308768
Description :


Bernard Romans's A Concise Natural History of East and West Florida, William Bartram's Travels, and James Adair's History of the American Indian are the three most significant accounts of the southeastern United States published during the late 18th century. This new edition of Romans's Concise Natural History, edited by historian Kathryn Braund, provides the first fully annotated edition of this early and rare description of both the European settled areas and the adjoining Indian lands in what are now the states of Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. Romans's purpose in producing his Concise Natural History was twofold: to aid navigators and shippers by detailing the sailing passages of the region and to promote trade and settlement in the region. To those ends, he provided detailed scientific observations on the natural history of the area, a summary of the region's political history, and an assessment of the potential for economic growth in the Floridas based on the area's natural resources. A trained surveyor and cartographer and a self-taught naturalist, Romans supplied detailed descriptions of the region's topography and environment, including information about the climate and weather patterns, plants, animals, and diseases. He provided information about the state of scientific inquiry in the South and touched on many of the most important intellectual arguments of the day, such as the origin of the races, the practice of slavery, and the benefits and drawbacks of monopoly on trade. In addition, Concise Natural History can be placed firmly in the genre of colonial promotional literature. Romans's book was an enthusiastic guide aimed at those seeking to establish modest holdings in the region: "What a field is open here! . . . No country ever had such inexhaustible resources; no empire had ever half so many advantages combining in its behalf!" Romans explained how settlers should travel to the area, what they would need in terms of provisions and tools, and what it would cost to have their land surveyed. In addition to providing an abundance of practical advice, Romans also offered information about the history of earlier settlements, including the earliest and most complete account of New Smyrna near St. Augustine. Romans also presented unique information about the various Indian tribes he encountered. In fact, historians agree that among the most useful portions of the book are Romans's descriptions of the largest Indian tribes in the 18th-century Southeast: the Creeks, Choctaws, and Chickasaws. Romans's account of the diet of the Creeks and Choctaws is one of the most complete available. And his description of the location of Choctaw village sites is one of the best sources for this information.


Author : Gregory A. Waselkov
Peter H. Wood
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 2006-12-01
Page : 550
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780803298613
Description :


Considered to be one of the all-time classic studies of southeastern Native peoples, Powhatan's Mantle proves more topical, comprehensive, and insightful than ever before in this revised edition for twenty-first century scholars and students.


Author : Robert Paulett
Publisher : University of Georgia Press
Release : 2012-09-01
Page : 264
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0820343463
Description :


Britain's colonial empire in southeastern North America relied on the cultivation and maintenance of economic and political ties with the numerous powerful Indian confederacies of the region. Those ties in turn relied on British traders adapting to Indian ideas of landscape and power. In An Empire of Small Places, Robert Paulett examines this interaction over the course of the eighteenth century, drawing attention to the ways that conceptions of space competed, overlapped, and changed. He encourages us to understand the early American South as a landscape made by interactions among American Indians, European Americans, and enslaved African American laborers. Focusing especially on the Anglo-Creek-Chickasaw route that ran from the coast through Augusta to present-day Mississippi and Tennessee, Paulett finds that the deerskin trade produced a sense of spatial and human relationships that did not easily fit into Britain's imperial ideas and thus forced the British to consciously articulate what made for a proper realm. He develops this argument in chapters about five specific kinds of places: the imagined spaces of British maps and the lived spaces of the Savannah River, the town of Augusta, traders' paths, and trading houses. In each case, the trade's practical demands privileged Indian, African, and nonelite European attitudes toward place. After the Revolution, the new United States created a different model for the Southeast that sought to establish a new system of Indian-white relationships oriented around individual neighborhoods.


Author : Colin Calloway
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release : 2021-04-13
Page :
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0197547672
Description :


During the years of the Early Republic, prominent Native leaders regularly traveled to American cities--Albany, Boston, Charleston, Philadelphia, Montreal, Quebec, New York, and New Orleans--primarily on diplomatic or trade business, but also from curiosity and adventurousness. They were frequently referred to as "the Chiefs now in this city" during their visits, which were sometimes for extended periods of time. Indian people spent a lot of time in town. Colin Calloway, National Book Award finalist and one of the foremost chroniclers of Native American history, has gathered together the accounts of these visits and from them created a new narrative of the country's formative years, redefining what has been understood as the "frontier." Calloway's book captures what Native peoples observed as they walked the streets, sat in pews, attended plays, drank in taverns, and slept in hotels and lodging houses. In the Eastern cities they experienced an urban frontier, one in which the Indigenous world met the Atlantic world. Calloway's book reveals not just what Indians saw but how they were seen. Crowds gathered to see them, sometimes to gawk; people attended the theatre to watch "the Chiefs now in this city" watch a play. Their experience enriches and redefines standard narratives of contact between the First Americans and inhabitants of the American Republic, reminding us that Indian people dealt with non-Indians in multiple ways and in multiple places. The story of the country's beginnings was not only one of violent confrontation and betrayal, but one in which the nation's identity was being forged by interaction between and among cultures and traditions.


Author : Theda Perdue
Michael D. Green
Publisher : Columbia University Press
Release : 2001
Page : 325
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780231115704
Description :


An historical survey of the various Southeastern peoples, from the pre-Columbian period of societal development through the invasion by Europeans, the colonial era, the exile of the "Five Civilized Tribes" to Oklahoma and the experience of those who stayed in the Southeast. The book examines not only the history but also the methodologies, attitudes and assumptions common to the historical study of American Indians.


Author : Gwyn Campbell
Suzanne Miers
Publisher : Ohio University Press
Release : 2007
Page : 329
Category : Social Science
ISBN 13 : 0821417258
Description :


The particular experience of enslaved women, across different cultures and many different eras is the focus of this work.


Author : Alan Bewell
Publisher : JHU Press
Release : 2017-01-02
Page : 416
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN 13 : 142142097X
Description :


Ultimately, Natures in Translation demonstrates that—far from being separate from the dominant concerns of British imperial culture—nature was integrally bound up with the business of empire.


Author : Kathryn E. Braund
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 1996-03-28
Page : 306
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 9780803261266
Description :


Deerskins and Duffels documents the trading relationship between the Creek Indians in what is now the southeastern United States and the Anglo-American peoples who settled there. The Creeks were the largest native group in the Southeast, and through their trade alliance with the British colonies they became the dominant native power in the area. The deerskin trade became the economic lifeblood of the Creeks after European contact. This book is the first to examine extensively the Creek side of the trade, especially the impact of commercial hunting on all aspects of Indian society. British trade is detailed here, as well: the major traders and trading companies, how goods were taken to the Indians, how the traders lived, and how trade was used as a diplomatic tool. The author also discusses trade in Indian slaves, a Creek-Anglo cooperation that resulted in the virtual destruction of the native peoples of Florida.


Author : Susanne Berthier-Foglar
Sheila Collingwood-Whittick
Publisher :
Release : 2012
Page : 461
Category : HEALTH & FITNESS
ISBN 13 : 9401208662
Description :


Where do our distant ancestors come from, and which routes did they travel around the globe as hunter-gatherers in prehistoric times? Genomics provides a fascinating insight into these questions and unlocks a mass of information carried by strands of DNA


Author : John Howard Payne
Daniel Sabin Butrick
Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
Release : 2010-10
Page : 561
Category : History
ISBN 13 : 0803228422
Description :